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Staying Home? Video Calls? Travel Plans? What to do???
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NewsTip -- Story Ideas and Contacts NewsTip -- Story Ideas and Contacts
Washington , DC
Monday, March 16, 2020

 

Staying Home?   Video Calls?   Travel Plans?   What to do???

 
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3) Contact, Mitchell Davis, send for help at:  ExpertClick@Gmail or (202) 333-5000
 
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Miss the Sunday News Feed:  See it here:
• "You never let a serious crisis go to waste" – "an opportunity to do things you think you could not do before." -- Rahm Emanuel
http://www.NewsReleaseWire.com/229057
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When Everyone Is Staying Home
 
Randy Rolfe - Parenting, Family and Lifestyle Author and Speaker Randy Rolfe - Parenting, Family and Lifestyle Author and Speaker
For Immediate Release: Dateline: West Chester , PA
For over 30 years I have been urging members of families  to appreciate how important they are to each other, and now with the ever present reminders that social gatherings are shutting down to try to minimize the impacts of this novel coronavirus, there seems to be a new conversation about what it means to be home with your kids all day, or how to relate to your spouse when you are both searching for new ways to manage work and home responsibilities and concerns in the same home space. Together time is on the rise all of a sudden. 
Here are a few quick tips from years of working with couples and parents to build and keep strong and rewarding relationships. RANDY'S TIPS:
(1) Acknowledge each other when you enter a room where they are, or they enter in a room where you are. Letting someone else know you are aware of their presence is extremely valuable, even if you just saw them 10 minutes ago somewhere else.
(2) Be open about your concerns. Don't let worries build up without letting others know your are feeling stress. They are likely to be a bit more generous with their time and their compassion. If they try to talk you out of it, be sure to own your feelings and listen but don't accept any judgment about your right to your feelings.
(3) Ask. Ask what they are thinking currently about any mutual concerns, like what to do with or for the children, how to pay bills with less money coming in, how to stock up on food, water, or paper goods and so on. Let them know their concerns and wishes are important to you.
(4) Be sensitive to age-appropriate communication with kids and elders. As a parent, part of your job is the shield you child from concerns too complex or unimaginable for their age or maturity. Be sure to let them know that things will sort themselves out okay. For elders, try not to burden them with concerns they can do nothing about. If your the sandwich generation, reassurance both up and down is your role, while you seek to take care of yourself through networks who can support you without taking on extra stress. 
(5) In close quarters, communication means everything, so you won't get on each other's nerves but instead feel supported and loved. At the same time, quiet and time alone must be respected too. Respect each family member's space and time to themselves. 
(6) Keep things in perspective. Things that may be annoying or frustrating on a normal day may need to be overlooked when new ways of being and interacting are emerging.
(7) Whether it's your partner, your child, or your elder, repeat often how you appreciate them, appreciate having them in your life, the little things they do every day, the silly things which amuse you and endear them to you, how you love them, your memories together, and your wishes for their future.
(8) Plan some good excuses to laugh together. Funny movie, silly game, preparation of a favorite meal, funny memories, family albums (real or digital!), a phone call or video call with a beloved relative.
I hope these thoughts help enrich your day!
Randy Rolfe      randyrolfe@gmail.com
Institute for Creative Solutions
West Chester, PA
833-725-3624
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How To Have A Video Call That Is Actually Productive
 
Val Wright -- Global Leadership and Innovation Expert Val Wright -- Global Leadership and Innovation Expert
For Immediate Release:   Dateline: Los Angeles , CA
 
This past week Google, Apple, Microsoft, and Amazon all advised corporate employees to temporarily work from home resulting in a flurry of meetings switching to the dreaded Zoom/Teams/BlueJeans/webEx video alternatives.  Most problems with video calls are solvable, but you have to prepare before, during and after the call.  Here are some fast tips for making your video calls far less painful:
Before
 
• Start them at 15m past the hour. Send a separate invite for 15m prior to the technology set up, downloading updates, and microphone and camera tests.
 
• Shut down all other apps. Even Evernote, mail, and web browsers zap your network capacity, switch off your dropbox sync, iCloud uploads or anything else in your house using significant wifi for the duration of your call (yes that might mean telling your kids to pause the Xbox update!)
 
• Consider buying your whole team noise-canceling headphones. I can't believe how good apple AirPods work to detect and remove background noise.
 
• Post the purpose of the meeting in the invite. 
 
• Make it clear if video is expected, optional, or if it is audio-only.
 
• If you are sharing slides or using chat features, explain so in the invite, or if dial-in only is acceptable.
 
During
 
• If greater than four attendees, use the chat technology to make the social "hello how are you?"'s efficient 
 
• Pose three contextual questions to answer in the chatbox: Answer these questions while we are waiting for others to join. (E.g. What did you think of the new product launch, Who saw the latest episode of the HULU show Lego Masters? Who has been to the Flutter Museum in LA?…get creative but make it inclusive and business-related.)
 
• Appoint someone to take notes and actions on the call.
 
• Ask for everyone to mute unless they are talking.
 
• If you are leading the meeting, have a list of names of all the participants next to you on paper so you can visually check everyone who needs to contribute or participate.
 
• Ask for participants to comment in the chatbox. For example, if you have just presented a new idea. "How likely do you think it is we have the resources to do this before the end of the year?, type 1-5 with 5 being highly likely and 1 being no way!) This lets you get quick feedback from attendees without managing the awkwardness of video chat interruptions and stilted conversations. 
 
• If you complete all your agenda items, end the meeting early!
 
After
 
• Save meeting notes and actions in a shared space.
 
• Ask attendees to rate the meeting and ask for ideas for improving the next one. You can use these rating *Exemplary *Could do better *Energy Zapper*.
 
 I'd love to hear your productivity tips for video calls! Let me know.
 
Dedicated to growing your business,
 
 
P.S. I hope you enjoyed this week's VAL-uable Insights, sign up here to get them in your inbox each Monday morning: http://valwrightconsulting.com/newsletter-sign-up/
 
  Val Wright is a recognized leadership and organization expert. Working with Xbox, Microsoft, Amazon and LinkedIn, she has spent the last 20 years partnering with executives to accelerate growth and gain market superiority across the the games, technology, retail and e-commerce industries.
 
She is know for telling leaders what they need to hear, not what they want to hear. Leaders seek her out when they need to accelerate their business results, build organizations, develop leaders and create world-class people strategies. Val is a dynamic speaker who will provoke, inspire and provide immediate value to your audience. She has been quoted in Fast Company, E-commerce times, Yahoo.com, Aol.com, usnews.com, NJ.com, TheNetworkJournal.com and TechNerwsWorld.com.
 
Val Wright Consulting
South Pasadena, CA
626 387 7600
 
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How Will COVID-19 Impact Your Travel Plans?
 
From:  Vicki Rackner MD ---  Selling to Doctors Vicki Rackner MD --- Selling to Doctors
For Immediate Release:  Dateline: Minneapolis , MN
 
Months ago my son booked a trip to Seattle to visit family and friends.  This week—one day before his scheduled flight— he asked me, "Is it too dangerous to travel? Should I cancel my trip?"
You might be asking similar questions.
 
Maybe you have plans to attend a meeting, or visit a client, or get away and recharge.
 
Do you follow through with your plans, or do you cancel?
 
I'll put on my doctor hat and offer some tips to help you make travel choices with greater confidence:
 
• Stay informed.  The event you're about to attend or the city you're about to visit will most likely have published recommendations.  Check regularly.
• Use reason.  We are in the grips of an epidemic of fear, and our feelings impact our perception of risk. While catching COVID-19 on a plane ride may be the overwhelming travel fear, statistically the biggest threat to your health may well involve the car ride to and from the airport. 
• Consider your circumstances.  A person undergoing chemotherapy may make very different choices than a young healthy gym rat.  While there are no right choices, there are choices that are right for YOU.
• Stay healthy.  Your immune system is like your own homeland security system.  Do simple things completely within your power to keep it strong.  Get a good night's sleep. Eat well.  Get regular exercise.  Cut back on adult beverages and stop smoking. 
• Stop touching your face.  Easier said than done!  A study of medical students shows that on average they touched their faces almost two dozen times each hour--even though they know better. Face-touching might be a behavior evolved to manage stress. I've always thought that the primary purpose of a face mask is to keep hands away from noses and mouthes.
• Avoid sick people, and stay home if you're sick.   
• Protect yourself on flights. Click here to get my plane travel tips.
• Invest in travel insurance.  The easiest way to do this is to book travel with a major credit card.  
My son's in Seattle right now having a great time. 
I plan to maintain my busy speaking travel schedule.
 
Hopefully you're better armed to make travel plans that work for YOU.
 
PS Stay tuned for daily emails to help you and your clients respond to the many COVID-19 challenges. Are there specific topics you would like me to address?
 
© 2020. Vicki Rackner MD.  All rights reserved.  You may reproduce this blog post with the following by-line:
Vicki Rackner MD is an author, speaker and consultant who offers a bridge between the world of medicine and the world of business. She helps financial advisors acquire physician clients, and she helps physicians run more successful practices. Contact her to learn more.
 
Click Here to jump to the Blog:  http://www.targetingdoctors.com/blog
 
 Vicky Rackner
Targeting Doctors    rackner@targetingdoctors.com
Mercer Island, WA
(425) 451-3777
 
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Love and Internal Communications in the Time of Coronavirus
  
CommPRO.biz -- Fay Shapiro CommPRO.biz -- Fay Shapiro
For Immediate Release:   Dateline: New York , NY  
 
Linda Dunbar, Global PR and Corporate Communications Strategist
 
It goes without saying that in a global pandemic, organizations need internal communications more than ever. Every crisis is different but there is commonality among crises. Unfortunately, this pandemic is a perfect example.  Just a short time ago, the coronavirus wasn't on anyone's radar. Now, it's the only thing anyone is talking about. Like most crises, it's a surprise, but looking in the rearview mirror maybe we should have seen it coming. And now that we know we have a crisis, we know we don't have all of the answers and we don't know when or if we'll get them.
 
What should organizations be thinking about at a time like this when it comes to internal communications?  In times of trouble, internal communications serves up information. But more importantly, it offers reassurance.
 
Five tips for leading, coping, and providing reassurance in extraordinary times.
Tell the truth. – The truth is not always pleasant but it is reassuring. In a time when people may feel unsure and confused it is reassuring to know the facts. Whatever you know that you can share, share it in a timely manner. Be diplomatic and deliberate in your delivery but don't sugarcoat.
 
• Get leadership out and about in-person or virtually. — Hearing directly from leadership is reassuring. In time of crisis, people like to know someone is in charge and thinking of their welfare. In this case, that means their wellness. It also means the wellness of the business. After the crisis is over, they may not remember exactly what you said but they will remember how you made them feel. How you respond in crisis and how you make employees feel will be your company talent retention brand long after the crisis ends.
• Strike the right balance in your internal communications cadence. – But don't worry if the cadence is not perfect. Under the current circumstances, it's better to communicate more than usual. However, employees are inundated with information about the coronavirus at this point. Consider ways to help staff focus on what they need to know, what the facts are, and what is expected of them. A regular cadence of information is important but not so much as to cause employees to tune out or increase existing anxiety or create panic.
 
• Help managers and employees cope. – Find ways to help managers brush up on their leadership skills.  Different skills sets are required to manage remote staff as well as staff who are in the office but may be feeling ill at ease. If this situation goes on longer than three weeks – and it most likely will – companies are going to have to reexamine how they approach work. And employees will need to pitch in together. At the moment, I suspect that people working from home are working "solo", getting what they need to get done done.  Over time, teams will need to coalesce as teams and find ways to be connected to the organization to prevent "social distancing" from becoming isolation.
 
• Don't be afraid to be human. – In some industries, love, kindness, and compassion are alien concepts reserved for the weak. But I have never heard a eulogy praising anyone for being ruthlessly competitive and unkind in the workplace. In the best of times, it's good to remember we don't know what other people are struggling with. Keep it professional but also be kind — these are strange times.
 
About the Author: Linda Dunbar is a global PR and corporate communications consultant, strategist, business enthusiast, and lifelong learner. A communications architect who builds corporate brands, she has extensive leadership experience in PR, media relations, corporate communications, and international strategic planning at dynamic, top-tier, global Fortune 500 companies. Her passion is helping companies tell their stories internally and externally in good times and bad. Linda has previously held communications leadership roles at organizations including Sterling Bancorp., Dow Jones, Ford Motor Company, and the American Institute of CPAs as well as at entrepreneurial PR ventures. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in East Asian Studies from Princeton University and a Master's in Law and Diplomacy from The Fletcher School, jointly administered by Harvard and Tufts Universities.
 
She can be reached at LindaDunbar24@gmail.com.
 
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Political Leadership During A Crisis such as Coronavirus
 
I don't want to sound cynical, but a crisis can actually be an opportunity for a political leader in an executive position. During a crisis, viewer- and readership of the news usually shoots up and people are much more informed about what their leaders are actually doing the entire day. While the practice of crisis management is extremely challenging, the theory and the manual are actually quite clear: During a time of crisis, a president, prime minister, governor or mayor has to act quickly. He or she has to be on top of things and release emergency funds. Let facts and science be the basis of decisions and give the experts everything they need. A leader should hit the right tone in his crisis communication. And it's also an opportunity for a political leader to show that he or she stands above partisanship.
How is Donald Trump doing so far? The things I just described might actually be a challenge to pull off for somebody like Donald Trump. And indeed, it seems to me that the White House has not yet found a coherent strategy. After weeks of downplaying the coronavirus, Trump has shifted in crisis management mode last week. Let's see how long it will last
The particularity of this crisis is that it will preoccupy many or most of us for weeks and months to come. It's practically impossible that it will disappear from the news in a few days. Thus, Trump's management of the corona crisis might actually prove crucial with respect to his prospects of winning reelection. His job approval rating stands at 45%, which is already dangerously low for an incumbent. A difference of a few percentage points might make a big difference for his reelection campaign.
As for the Democratic primary, I think that the race is basically decided. I don't see what Bernie Sanders could do in terms of messaging or tactics to turn this thing around. And I doubt that the voters will be much interested in the primary campaign during the corona crisis. Unless Joe Biden self-destructs anytime soon (which I would not put past him and is probably one of the reasons why Sanders actually stays in the race), I say this: Call the dogs in, the hunt is over.
Perron Campaigns
Dr. Louis Perron    lperron@perroncampaigns.com
Seefeldstr. 69
8008 Zürich
Switzerland
 
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Trump's Eight Biggest Coronavirus Crisis Failures Companies Should Avoid Repeating
 
From:  Edward Segal -- Crisis Management Expert Edward Segal -- Crisis Management Expert
Washington , DC
 
Crisis management expert and author Edward Segal said today there are eight major mistakes President Trump has made in responding to and managing the coronavirus crisis that businesses and organizations should avoid repeating as they rush to grapple with this or any other crisis.
 
"It's easier, faster, and more affordable to learn from the mistakes of others than having to learn the hard way what you should have done in a crisis. That's especially true in this rapidly worsening virus crisis, which is creating crisis situations for companies and organizations around the world," Segal said.
 
"As the country's crisis manager in chief, Trump is conducting a master class in how not to deal with a crisis," he said.  Segal said Trump's eight biggest crisis management failures are:
 
Failure #1: Being unprepared.for a crisis.
 
Failure #2: Waiting too long to respond to a crisis.
 
Failure #3: Not telling the truth about the crisis.
 
Failure #4: Underestimating the impact of the crisis.
 
Failure #5: Putting the wrong person in charge to deal with the crisis.
 
Failure #6: Saying or doing anything not supported by the facts.
 
Failure #7: Contradicting the experts.
 
Failure #8: Blaming others.
 
"Until now, most companies haven't had to deal with a crisis or one of this magnitude. If they didn't have a crisis management plan in place before this crisis, if they didn't test the plan to ensure it would work, and if they don't have the right people managing the situation, then businesses and organizations are flying blind and run the risk of repeating some or all of Trump's mistakes when they respond to this or any other crisis,"  Segal said.
 
About Edward Segal
 
Segal managed a variety of crisis situations as the CEO of the Greater Los Angeles REALTORS® Association and the Marin Association of REALTORS® in Northern California, has conducted crisis management training for hundreds of business executives, and has advised companies and on how to respond to and recover from crises.
 
He is the author of the forthcoming book on crisis management: Crisis Ready — 101 Ways to Prepare for and Bounce Back from Disasters, Scandals, and Other Emergencies (Nicholas Brealey/Hachette Distribution). Crisis Ready is filled with instructive case studies of how companies and public figures — such  as Amazon, Disney, Apple, and entrepreneur Elon Musk — have prepared for and handled crisis situations. The book includes checklists and exercises to help get ready for and react to a crisis, and a customizable crisis management plan. Order a copy at https://amzn.to/2qTbCfi
 
Contact Segal at getcrisisready@gmail.com or visit GetCrisisReady.com.
                                                 ###
Edward Segal
Crisis Management Expert
GetCrisisReady.com
Washington, DC
415-218-8600 
 
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Click to www.NewsReleaseWire.com to open and read all releases or click on release of interest.
 
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http://www.NewsReleaseWire.com/229073
 
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Mitchell Davis
Washington, DC
202-333-5000
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