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Cabin Fever? – Four Interview Guests & Resources to Keep Families Sane
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Wednesday, March 18, 2020

 

Cabin Fever?

– Four Interview Guests & Resources to Keep Families Sane

Three ways to book these talk show guests:

1) Reply with subject "Invite All:" to advise the top five profiled guests to call in to apply for open time slots – please state: a. Booker name and call sign. b. Time slots & state your time zone. c. Contact name and phone numbers for bookers.

2) Reply individually by phone or e-mail for selected.

3) Contact, Mitchell Davis, send for help at: ExpertClick@Gmail or (202) 333-5000

 

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10 Tips for Parents: How to Restructure Your Preschooler's Schedule to Create a Daily Routine During the Coronavirus Crisis

 

Wondering how you and your preschooler will survive the coronavirus-related school closing? You may be tempted to dump your daily routine and transition to a vacation mentality but thinking long term will be more beneficial. While our older children will be immersed in distance learning, we can reframe and restructure our younger children's schedule to create a daily routine. The learning experience will be different than the formal school one, but these 10 tips were designed to make the process easier for you and for them.

1. Get them dressed… and dress yourself as well: We all do better with routine which sets expectations. While it may be tempting to lounge in your pajamas and allow your children to do the same, the lack of routine for everyone can be confusing, particularly when it lasts more than a few days. Lose the snow day mentality and think more long term.

2. Create a schedule: Do it with the kids or for them, depending on their age. Use timers to allow for digital/TV time and digital detox time. The timer is the equivalent of the school bell which helps children of all ages define the class "period." Try to model their day at home to their day at school (as much as possible) with specified times for different activities. And don't hesitate to give them jobs...they are used to having them at school.

3. Redefine learning: Unexpected prolonged school closing forces us to rethink learning expectations. Involving children in daily chores like setting the table or going to the supermarket gives us the opportunity to teach some of the same skills they learn in school but in a different way. For example, setting the table involves sequencing (what comes first, second, third), going to the supermarket teaches to make lists, feel the textures of the fruits and veggies (rough and smooth), count the items on the conveyor belt, estimate the total cost of the total purchases and of course promote vocabulary. Baking brownies is a science lesson bathed in chocolate with the opportunity to teach shapes as you cut them for consumption. There is so much opportunity for informal learning. This is an important time to seize it. 

4. Create a theme: Teachers often design their weekly curriculum around a theme. Follow their example and keep it up at home. Your theme could incorporate letters, numbers, colors, holidays and animals to name a few. For inspiration, email your teacher or Google.

5. Reshuffle the shelf: Put away all the books and toys and then take out five each day to match your theme or your mood (if you have no time to have a theme). This way old toys and books will feel new and you will avoid the temptation of ordering new ones.

6. Do good: Nursing homes and assisted living facilities are restricting visitors to contain the spread of the coronavirus. Offer your children the opportunity to "do good" by making cards for others. You can use your theme in choosing colors, letters etc. in the design or just let their imagination run wild. Mailing a snail mail letter in a mailbox can be an added lesson on old-fashioned forms of communication.

7. Think out of the box: While we stock up on toilet paper and cans of tuna, there should be plenty of boxes lying around. Refrain from throwing them out since they can become part of valuable learning tools. Tape them up and turn them into blocks. Paint them in the color of the day, decoupage them with magazine pics which follow your theme.

8. Download audio books for kids to read while you are doing your work or catching up on chores. Look into learning apps and websites. Here are some of the ones we use in our telespeech sessions like PBS and ABCmouse.

9. Get crafty: Stock up on basic art supplies such as big rolls of paper, crayons, markers, paints and play dough which can easily be incorporated into a lesson or suggested tools for free play.

10. Refrain from recycling: Instead of putting the newspapers and magazines in the recycling bin, put them to good use. In the hands of your children, those recyclables can be a great medium for practicing scissor cutting, finding pictures or letters for a theme or covering a card or box for decoupage.

For more information about Great Speech, visit www.greatspeech.com

Karen Dennis

305-527-8876

karensuedennis@gmail.com

 

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-- Set up a free Zoom video conference with your friends.

 

If you're craving more connection or feeling your productivity lag, join a virtual coworking community or start your own. To start your own, consider the following tips: 1) Use Zoom Video Conferencing: After trying several platforms, Morrison decided on this one. It's affordable and you can run meetings for up to 24 hours. 2) Collaborate with at least 5 people: This way, if a few people can't make the session, you'll still have a quorum. 3) Maintain your agenda: It's all too easy for virtual coworking to become a virtual hangout. Make sure everyone who comes knows this is a time to work, not to socialize.

Megan Taylor Morrison

megan@megantaylormorrison.com

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FreePrintable.net At-Home Learning Resources

Thousands of worksheets and classroom printables are available to download and print for free at FreePrintable.net websites. These resources are especially of value to families with children out of school due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic. "As a parent with a child unexpectedly at home for the foreseeable future, I can definitely relate to the need to keep students' minds sharp and active," said Kevin Savetz, who launched his first printables site in 2005. "With printables, all you need is your home printer and you can have high-quality educational resources instantly in-hand." InstantWorksheets.net has 1,372 worksheets for all grade levels, from alphabet practice to math to science, in both PDF and DOC formats. The lesson plan templates, test forms, graphic organizers and other classroom management tools at TeachersPrintables.net are ideal for teaching at home as well as in a classroom setting. Other FreePrintable.net sites that are especially handy for at-home learning include PrintableWorldMap.net, with printable state, continent, constellation and other maps; PrintablePlayMoney.net for play money; and FreeWordSearch.net for creating and printing word search puzzles.

Recently, Savetz launched a brand-new website called PrintablesToday.com. The daily printables site has vocabulary words, holidays, a Hero of the Day, planners, and other fun and educational stuff. "Social distancing is a smart and considerate practice during a pandemic, and so is limiting trips to the store," Savetz said. "You can download and print sheets of lined, graph and specialty papers and even games at PrintablePaper.net."

The chore charts and activity trackers at ChoreCharts.net are helpful in keeping kids (and grownups) on-task. There are lots of to-do lists at PrintableToDoList.com and calendars at Printable2020calendars.com. For fun, there are thousands of coloring pages at FreePrintableColoringPages.net. There's a free version of every printable at every FreePrintable.net site. However, some sites have convenient options for those who would like to download and save hundreds of printables at once. At InstantWorksheets.net, the all-in-one download is $99, and at TeachersPrintables.net it's just $27 for a single-classroom license ($67 for whole-school) to download and use all 1,425 printables. "I hope that people are staying as safe and healthy as possible and that these printables can help," Savetz said.

There are more than 100 sites in the FreePrintable.net family of free printables sites created by Savetz Publishing, Inc., a company devoted to creating useful and informative web sites of interest to consumers and small businesses.

Kevin Savetz

(707) 400-6360

savetz@gmail.com

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Helping Children from Going Limbic Sustained emotional stress can suppress the body's immune system.

For parents wondering what to tell children about Coronavirus, Dr. MacLean's concepts are a good foundation. Stress suppresses the body's immune system "Sustained emotional stress often produces hormonal imbalances that not only affect bodily functions, but can also suppress the body's immune system," marriage and family therapist Lori Heyman Gordon writes. Gordon, creator of the acclaimed Practical Application of Intimate Relationship Skills ("PAIRS") program, said understanding the ABC's of the brain is important to helping children, couples and families cope with stress, anxiety, and trauma.

Three words "Trying to have a logical conversation with someone in sensory overload is like pouring your favorite drink into a covered glass — it just spills everywhere, doesn't do any good for anyone, and it's gone," said Seth Eisenberg, CEO of the nonprofit Purpose Built Families Foundation in Pembroke Pines, Fla. and an author of The 14-Day Class. "Once children are old enough to watch television by themselves, surf the web, or talk to friends, parenting through trauma is almost entirely about three words," he said. "Tell me more." Ask, don't tell Although Eisenberg is not a mental health professional, he said MacLean's concept was key to providing skills training to help elementary, middle, and high school students exposed to trauma. "A child, especially, is much more likely to find relief from talking than being talked at," he said.

Emptying the emotional jug Eisenberg said training parents and partners to empty their emotional jugs helps them get to a place where rational, logical conversations can make a difference. Nearly half a decade after MacLean's pioneering research at the National Institute for Mental Health, the concept is catching on. Hundreds of professionals serving veteran and military families have learned to teach the "Emptying the Emotional Jug" exercise — even helping soldiers in the battlefield. The exercise is one of several Eisenberg included in The 14-Day Class to help strengthen couples and families who are staying home during the Coronavirus outbreak. Find a quiet place Helping children through Coronavirus changes should include regularly finding a quiet place to sit free from distractions and asking about their feelings, with questions like: "What are you mad about?" "What are you sad about?" "What are you scared or worried about?" "When you really give a child a chance to express their feelings without interrupting, explaining, interjecting, or trying to fix something, they often feel better," Eisenberg said. "With everything happening today, that's something we can do every day." MacLean's triune brain concept explains why the exercise is so helpful, as does Psychiatrist Daniel Casriel's approach to "sick and well." "Suppressed feelings have enormous energy and keep people stuck in the limbic system," Eisenberg said. "When expressed, that energy can quickly change, bringing relief, and making room for uplifting emotions such as happiness, tenderness, and joy.

Listening with empathy is more important than talking, denying, fixing, or trying to change things that aren't in our hands." "Building trust, strengthening connection, making it safe for our children to confide and be vulnerable, that is in our hands," he said.

Seth Eisenberg

888-724-7748

seth.eisenberg@pairs.com

Cell Phone: 954-554-3306

 

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Mitchell P. Davis
Broadcast Interview Source, Inc.
Washington, DC
202-333-5000
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