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The Society for the Advancement of Consulting®
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Society for the Advancement of Consulting Society for the Advancement of Consulting
For Immediate Release:
Dateline: Claremont, CA
Tuesday, May 31, 2022

 
The Society for the Advancement of Consulting®https://consultingsociety.comThu, 26 May 2022 15:17:43 +0000en-UShourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.0The Powerful Way to Promote Your Book Todayhttps://consultingsociety.com/the-powerful-way-to-promote-your-book-today/https://consultingsociety.com/the-powerful-way-to-promote-your-book-today/#respondThu, 26 May 2022 14:43:25 +0000https://consultingsociety.com/?p=15769Speaker: Dan Janal

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Recorded May 24, 2022

Speaker: Dan Janal

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The Surprising Way to Boost Your Sales Team’s Moralehttps://consultingsociety.com/the-surprising-way-to-boost-your-sales-teams-morale/Wed, 11 May 2022 05:48:31 +0000https://consultingsociety.com/?p=15731Leverage Testimonials to Boost Your Sales Team’s Morale

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Want to boost your sales team’s morale?

I don’t blame you. Let’s face it, the top sales teams have no shortage of morale on their side.

When you picture a high-performance sales team in your head, do you see a group of sulking, tired individuals who are struggling to even pick up the phone or answer an email?

Of course not.

We all know that happy, motivated, and proud salespeople tend to be the same ones who deliver the results. There are a plethora of different ways to boost morale in your sales team, most of which, you’ve probably already heard of or have tried applying in the past—perhaps with no noticeable improvement.

But, there’s one tool, often used for other purposes, that can motivate and inspire your team—and you’ve perhaps never thought of using it internally.

Enough suspense. Leverage your testimonials!

Leverage Testimonials to Boost Your Sales Team’s Morale

Yes, while testimonials are normally used externally to attract new buyers, using them internally has a wide range of benefits that are often overlooked. One of these benefits is a culture that promotes greater sales and results from your reps.

Think about it, if a client provides you with a testimonial on the success they were able to achieve because of your company or a specific rep, and you share this story within your team, you are promoting more of the same behaviour. You will inspire the rest of your sales team to create similar outstanding results because not only will they know it’s possible and within their grasp, but they’ll realize that their work is appreciated and recognized publicly—both inside and outside of your company.

The result of this? Increased morale, better customer service, friendlier interactions between your team, and other positive outcomes that lead to greater sales in your organization.

By the way, don’t think you need to show testimonials exclusively to your sales team. This surprising morale-boosting tool should be distributed and used across your entire organization.

Take it a step further. When a client sends you an email praising your organization’s work, do you keep it to yourself or do you let the specific individual in charge of that account know of their good work? When a customer mentions in passing that they were so impressed with the service that a particular rep gave them, do you just take a mental note or do you relay that positive comment with the rep?

Why miss out on opportunities to praise your team?

Let your people see the kind of results they and their peers are creating, celebrate them, and watch your morale (and your sales) soar to new heights!

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Lies in Your Inboxhttps://consultingsociety.com/lies-in-your-inbox/Wed, 11 May 2022 05:46:45 +0000https://consultingsociety.com/?p=15692Lies don’t sell. But they do scale: just not in the way you’d wish. All they end up doing is hurting trust in the selling business—and does so at a time when we need to be doing more to build trust between people.

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Do you have lies in your inbox?

“Hi there! Greetings!

On my visit at your office, I found out that your organization is still using the manual registers for visitor’s entry.

Registers are prone to error in adding visitor’s details, fraudulent activities, data manipulation, time consuming, old-fashioned , hard to find the [sic] old data.

We help the businesses in automating the visitor’s entry and they can integrate this data to their CRM and this data can be used by Sales and Marketing team.

If you are the right person of [sic] contact, Would you be available for 15 mins demo session this week?

Else [sic] can you refer me to the right person of contact?”

I’ll bet that—just like me—you get emails all the time like the one I just cited above. It’s disheartening. Over a dozen years have passed since I co-authored my first book, Honesty Sells, in which I made a solid case that there’s no place for dishonesty in the sales profession. And yet lies like the ones in that damning email—poorly written, no less—keep filling up inboxes everywhere.

What did that particular seller hope to accomplish with their outreach? It won’t surprise you to know that this person has never visited my office. Nor do I have manual registers in my office. I know this…and they know I know this. And yet, they still decide to make this their opening move! This is how they’re choosing to define what they hope will be a new business relationship.

Well, they got my attention…but not in the way they’d hoped.

So, why then is lying as a means of getting a foot in the door still so pervasive? Is it that it’s rewarded enough to make each transgression worth the risk? I can’t imagine that to be the case. That’s a shortsighted strategy that eventually catches up with anyone.

Here are some thoughts about why the lies keep on coming…even though it only hurts the seller. Sometimes, even terminally.

Lies in Your Inbox: 5 Reasons They Keep Happening

1. Lying Is Easier Than Doing the Work

Lying happens for a reason: just not a very good one. As American neuroscientist Sam Harris points out in his essay, Lying, it “is both a failure of understanding and an unwillingness to be understood.” As a seller, your first job is to correctly understand the needs of your customers. If you get that wrong, nothing else you do will matter. To illustrate: I recently received a separate email from an “online contest votes provider” (how’s that for a title?) with this offer: “Do you need any help to win [name of contest withheld to avoid embarrassing the seller any further]…I help participants win the contest by providing cast votes.” Suffice to say: had that individual put even the tiniest effort into understanding my needs, my business, and my values, they’d know that winning something at any price means nothing to me. You can’t be lazy and succeed in sales.

2. Understanding Takes Time

Another reason I suspect is behind why lies keep filling our inboxes is that many sellers can’t be bothered to spend time to gain a deeper understanding of their audience. Research takes time and costs money…whereas it can seem like the cost of sending an email—even a dishonest one—is practically zero. If their research budget is as slim as their desire to understand someone well, their thinking likely goes this way: “Why not just lie and hope for the best? And if things don’t turn out…there’s no cost, right?” Dead wrong. And that takes me to my next point.

3. There’s Always a Cost

There’s no such thing as a zero-cost email. There is a price to everything in business. If you choose to make dishonesty an integral part of how you treat others, that will define you and your brand…and will do so in a way that you might never be able to shake off. That risk extends to others close by who see a lie being engaged and choose to do nothing about it. Let’s say you’re working for a company and you catch wind of something dishonest that’s brewing in another division. You have an ethical and moral responsibility to speak out and do the right thing. Your brand and your reputation are on the line here—never just someone else’s.

4. There’s No Such Thing as a Business Lie

Sometimes, we hear someone rationalize their dishonesty, attempting to minimize it by saying, “It’s not a real lie…it’s just a business lie.” I can promise you that your audience won’t see it that way. They will never forget how you make them feel, as Maya Angelou once pointed out. And being lied to in business is at once unforgivable…and unforgettable.

5. Think Customer Centricity

In my new book, Right on the Money, I talk about how your customer must be at the center of how you do business now. Those who choose to buy from you expect you to tailor the entire process to them and their needs. That includes being honest with them and being someone worthy of their trust. If you do the opposite, be prepared for equally disappointing results. Lying just teaches others that you’ll do anything to close a deal. And that’s something entirely outside of customer centricity.

WE CAN—AND MUST—DO BETTER IN SERVICE OF BUILDING TRUST!

To conclude: I’m not sharing these stories to condemn some sellers as being irredeemably unethical in their email pitches. What I am saying is that those same individuals have been misled into believing that being lazy is a strategy. Lies don’t sell. But they do scale: just not in the way you’d wish. All they end up doing is hurting trust in the selling business—and does so at a time when we need to be doing more to build trust between people.

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The Art of Leading with Lovehttps://consultingsociety.com/the-art-of-leading-with-love/Wed, 11 May 2022 05:45:37 +0000https://consultingsociety.com/?p=15655Even the smallest act of kindness can help meet our need for love. According to researchers, committing kindness over a seven-day period increases our sense of happiness. And, it matters not if it is offered to strangers, acquaintances, co-workers, or close friends—all have an equally positive effect.

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Lead with Love

As a business leader, how do you lead with love? How is love practiced in your organization?

Given the volatility of 2021, I’ve been exploring this facet of leadership. Tension and anger in the workplace is on the rise. Some HR researchers anticipate this will continue throughout 2022.

In a recent article published by Harvard Business Review (January 2022), eleven current trends foster ongoing workplace volatility. Some of the top issues leaders and managers will face include:

  1. Fairness and equity
  2. Vaccine mandates and testing
  3. Shorter work week
  4. Employee turnover
  5. Permanent shift to remote technology/tools
  6. Permanent hybrid work model
  7. Wellness tactics, technologies, and metrics
  8. The need for a Chief Purpose Officer (CPO)
  9. Manager-employee interpersonal relationships

There is a growing urgency to strengthen manager-employee interpersonal relationships, and for some organizations, a shift or addition of a CPO. You see, at a minimum, the volatility we are experiencing creates stress for individuals, poor working relationships, and decreased productivity. Left unchecked, psychological abuse, violence, and ruin ensue. Great leaders can manage and even avoid these worst-case scenarios by leading with love.

Our Need for Love

All humans need love: we need to be loved and nurtured, and we need to express love. It’s one of our most fundamental needs. And it’s no surprise that this need carries into the workplace. For many, having healthy business and professional relationships is a top goal. That’s why they practice love in the workplace.

Leading with love is doing the right thing, at the right time, in the right spirit (motivation). This type of love embodies courageousness, discernment, justice, and humility—it’s not about our natural preferences. Leaders who practice this type of love know that expressing love, empathy, and compassion is a mutually beneficial endeavor.

Even the smallest act of kindness can help meet our need for love. According to researchers, committing kindness over a seven-day period increases our sense of happiness. And, it matters not if it is offered to strangers, acquaintances, co-workers, or close friends—all have an equally positive effect.

Leadership, Love, and Blind Spots

When it comes to leadership and love, even the best leaders have blind spots. Generally speaking, this is a good thing: it can even a playing field. However, as Steven Snyder wrote in Leadership and the Art of Struggle, “Blind spots are the product of an overactive automatic mind and an underactive reflective mind.” This can be especially dangerous for leaders.

In Thinking Fast and Slow, psychologist and economist Daniel Kahneman describes how our fast, automatic mind reaches conclusions (re: judgments) quickly, typically prematurely, and frequently incorrectly; but our slow, reflective mind challenges assumptions, generates alternatives, and objectively evaluates and analyzes them.

Fast thinking happens frequently. And it’s understandable: slow thinking requires a lot of energy. Unfortunately, the alternative fast thinking does not address leadership blind spots, especially when it comes to self-perception.

You see, most of us have a blind spot for our good qualities and a magnifying glass for our flaws. Whether we recognize it or not, this can do a lot of damage to our confidence, happiness, and ability to love others. When we let our self-criticism go unchallenged, it not only causes more harm and suffering, it hurts those around us.

The more we deny these blind spots, the more miserable we become. This distorted image is not the truth; rather, it reinforces the inner dialogue that can keep us stuck. Instead, we can change the stories we tell ourselves that result from habitual fast thinking.

Practice Self-love

First, take a deep breath to slow your pace and clear your mind. Look at the whole picture. Instead of beating yourself up, think about how you would feel if your best friend had a similar flaw, made the same choice, or acted in a similar manner. From this perspective, it probably doesn’t look so bad, or whatever negative label you put on it.

Now, give yourself a break. Think back to something you recently did that was loving and kind. Allow yourself to linger in that memory to rebalance your feelings.

Then, practice forgiveness. One helpful technique is a loving-kindness meditation. Here is a very simple, basic meditation to start:

  • May I be happy
  • May I be well
  • May I be safe
  • May I be peaceful and at ease

The way we treat ourselves matters more than we realize. Self-compassion empowers us to work through different moments of life with more resilience and grace.

Extend Love at Work

The loving-kindness meditation published on Greater Good Science Center at Berkeley  is a helpful way to extend love at work. This meditation was created by Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research Education, who define compassionate love as:

“…An attitude toward other(s), either close others or strangers or all of humanity; containing feelings, cognitions, and behaviors that are focused on caring, concern, tenderness, and an orientation toward supporting, helping, and understanding the other(s), particularly when the other(s) is (are) perceived to be suffering or in need.” (Sprecher & Fehr, 2005)

The Platinum Rule

People are starving for connection and hope amidst all of the uncertainty and fear we experienced over the past two years.

In light of these issues, it’s crucial for leadership to offer love using what anthropologist Dr. Helen Fisher describes as, The Platinum Rule: treat others not as you want to be treated (The Golden Rule), but as they want to be treated.

Ask, listen, confirm, offer, and if agreed, act.

Love What You Do at Work

According to a recently published article “Managing a Polarized Workforce,” (Harvard Business Review, March-April 2022), “conflict is an inescapable part of work life for employees at all levels.” Their recent survey of US companies reveals that 89% of respondents report experiencing conflict at work and “spend about 3.5 hours a week, on average, dealing with it.”

Given this environment, especially for those who do not thrive in conflict, how are we able to love what we do at work? It boils down to identifying that which is truly meaningful.

Language Matters

Language is powerful. It doesn’t merely describe, it shapes reality. Language becomes the filter through which we perceive the world.

When we talk about work that is truly meaningful, we are talking about the fundamental and essential human need of purpose. Many leaders have broadened their vocabulary to include words such as, “community, meaning, service, contribution, joy, passion, vocation, and soul,” knowing they are powerful, meaningful, and engaging. They understand that who you are and what you stand for are as important as what you do and sell.

Great leaders and managers tap into what is truly meaningful by daily asking (and answering) three questions.

Daily Engagement Questions

  1. What ignites my passion in today’s work? Reclaim your resources—energy, time, and attention—from the urgent to the meaningful.
  2. How can I bring true value to this moment? Disengage from emotional entanglements and take constructive action.
  3. What would I like my legacy to be in this assignment? Bring more value and meaning to a seemingly onerous task.

Managing (and meeting) external responsibilities while fulfilling internal goals is a process. A bit of self-talk can help reframe a task:  “If I do this, then:”

  1. “I’ll be one step closer to…”
  2. “I will free up time for…”
  3. “It will enable us to move forward to…”

Wise leadership teams also frequently ask and collectively answer:

  1. What brings meaning and community to our company?
  2. How can this meeting or project be an expression of our highest aims?
  3. What would be of service right now?
  4. How can this conversation be more open, clear, or authentic?
  5. What is our larger responsibility as a team or organization?

Not everyone thrives in the face of conflict. Instead, many prefer to avoid it. But, we know that when managed well, diverse and often opposing ideas can foster progress and innovation. The key is to remain curious, open-minded, and listen well.

Workplace Romance

On February 2, 2022, the president of CNN Worldwide publicly announced his resignation because he had failed to disclose a personal relationship with a CNN senior executive.  According to both parties, the relationship was consensual and had grown from professional, to personal, to intimate. This leads many to ask: when co-workers seek connection and friendship, should love or dating be verboten?

Views and opinions on workplace romance vary greatly depending on the size of the organization, the history (of the organization and the individual), and the perceived risk of intimate alliances. And so do company policies.

According to a 2018 survey conducted by Challenger, Gray & Christmas, and published by Harvard Law School, the number of close personal relationship policies is on the rise. They report that in 2017, more than 50% of respondents have formal, written policies and 78% discourage supervisor-subordinate relationships. However, this does not mean they have anti-fraternization policies. Why?

The Cons of Non-fraternization Policies

  • Grey areas: what is a close, personal relationship?
  • Enforcement: who monitors compliance?
  • Paternalism: should employers have the authority regarding personal matters?

Many of us have heard meet-cute stories that originated in the workplace. This is no surprise, given that 35-40% of those surveyed report having a workplace romance, and 72% would do so again. Surprisingly, 22% dated a supervisor. So would a non-fraternization policy prevent this?

The Pros of Non-fraternization Policies

  • Prevent sexual harassment
  • Mitigate organization’s legal risk
  • Curtail workplace favoritism/toxicity
  • Outline accountability processes and consequences

Clearly, there are multiple considerations, including the approach, the scope, and the consequences. While every employee should review their organization’s policies, leaders and managers should review for:

  • How does the policy address employee’s concerns?
  • What channels are in place to support employees? How can they report/disclose their intentions/status? Who must do this? (The more senior in the relationship?)
  • Where are the grey areas? Who is responsible for decisions in these areas?

Truly successful organizations are led with love; what is happening in your organization?

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist & Executive Coach
Trusted Leadership Advisor
Emotional intelligence and Mindful Leadership Consultant
San Francisco Bay Area and Beyond!
www.workingresources.com
mbrusman@workingresources.com
415-546-1252

Top 5 Clifton Strengths – Maximizer, Learner, Ideation, Strategic, Individualization
VIA Character Strengths – Love of Learning, Social Intelligence, Bravery, Gratitude, Appreciation of Beauty&Excellence

I coach emotionally intelligent and mindful leaders to cultivate trust and full engagement in a purpose-driven culture who produce results.

Pause, Breathe, Be Present, Love, Open to Possibility, Cultivate a Meaningful Life
Live Deeply Into Your Magnificence and Our Shared Humanity in the Present Moment

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The Importance of Coaching Todayhttps://consultingsociety.com/the-importance-of-coaching-today/Mon, 18 Apr 2022 03:41:48 +0000https://consultingsociety.com/?p=15016How is your organization working within the ever-growing gig economy? Let me ask: how do leaders engage with and develop future leaders?

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The Importance of Coaching Today

How is your organization working within the ever-growing gig economy? Let me ask: how do leaders engage with and develop future leaders?

This is a frequent topic of discussion with many millennials today. And it’s no surprise. The number of entrepreneurs, freelancers, or gig workers—those independent contractors who offer services in “one and done” or project contracts—is growing.

According to data the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics collected in 2005, 2-4% of all workers were contingent (i.e. short term) and 7% were alternative (freelance, independent consultants, or on-call workers). In 2017, the total number grew to 34%, or 55 million workers, and according to Reuters.com, was projected to rise to 43% for 2020. (Studies are still pending.)

When half of U.S. workers polled prefer the flexibility of independent or gig work, retaining high-performers, and identifying and developing future leaders, is more important than ever before.

Effective Execution

Recovering from a crisis is a process. It takes time, preparation, and effective execution: a culture that executes specific behaviors and techniques. Going beyond recovery for competitive advantage requires a discipline and system: a comprehensive understanding of the business, its people, and its environment.

An effective execution links three core processes of any organization: the people process, the strategy, and the operating plan to achieve its mission and goals. But in a gig economy, the three core processes are at greater risk to disconnect. Leadership, regardless of level, must be passionately engaged in the organization.

The importance of coaching today cannot be overstated. It is no longer reserved for problem employees or top performers. Enabling all employees to achieve business objectives in the shortest possible time is critical for success.

What Type of Coaching is Best?

At its core, the objective of coaching is to increase performance, achievement, and/or well-being in individuals, teams, and organizations through proven methods grounded in scientific research. There are many types of coaching (and many ways to achieve results), in four broad categories with different emphases:

  1. Behavioral Coaching/Coaching Leaders
  2. Life Coaching/Career Coaching
  3. Coaching for Organizational Change.
  4. Strategy Coaching

While there are distinctions between coaching, consulting, mentoring, advising, and counseling, qualified coaches meld differences into a successful coaching process at different times in particular situations.

Debunk Coaching Myths

One of the greatest coaching myths is that coaching is simply goal setting with accountability and a bit of “rah-rah” or hype for motivation. Sure, taping in to the human spirit is an important component to expand human capacity to achieve stretch goals. But more importantly is to consider and alter the underlying context in which goal setting, motivation, and feedback occur.

Underlying context is all of the conclusions, beliefs, and assumptions you (and/or the group of people) have reached in order to succeed. It is shaped by the shared interpretations you have about your business environment. It also includes the management culture, inherited or self-imposed. This basic cultural context must be considered in creating a framework for effective coaching.

Effective Coaching

Today’s successful organizations rely on a new kind of management culture, one that is based on creating new knowledge. This requires constant learning. A crucial catalyst in this new management culture is the transformational coach. His or her job is to provide direction while leaving plenty of room for people to pursue their passions, personal interests, and projects.

In its simplest terms, effective coaching involves expanding people’s capacity to take effective action. It involves challenging underlying beliefs and assumptions that are responsible for one’s actions and behaviors. At its deepest level, effective coaching examines not only what one does, and why one does what one does, but also who one is.

Measure Your Coaching ROI

When applying common return on investment (ROI) standards for evaluating training and development programs, the amount of variables challenges the ability to establish reliable data. It is difficult to quantify data of a qualitative nature.

The marketplace is perhaps the most vocal proponent of the use of coaching. Top corporations and leading organizations are among those that invest heavily in hiring coaches for their executives. According to ibisworld.com, 2021 annual spending on business coaching in the U.S. will reach $10.9 billion.

Organizations, entrepreneurs, and even gig workers with smaller budgets are wise to follow. Successful companies don’t throw money at programs that don’t have a positive impact on their bottom line—or, at least, they don’t for very long. Even so, the question remains how to measure the ROI.

5 Key ROI Indicator

To measure your ROI, look to changes in individual and/or team:

  1. Productivity
  2. Outlook/feelings
  3. Specific behaviors and/or skills
  4. New insights that support progress toward goals
  5. Qualitative and quantitative measures: feedback, scores, self-reporting, etc., and what matters most to the client.

Get the Most from Your Coaching

Consider these questions to ensure that those being coached, as well as the organization, are getting the most from coaching:

  1. Is the organization committed to coaching as a process, rather than just an event?
  2. Are supervisors of those being coached committed to the coaching process?
  3. What are the types of changes that you hope will result?
  4. Have you established internal measurements to identify when you have achieved success?
  5. What are the benchmarks/baselines/waypoints on those measures?
  6. Do you have a control group identified?
  7. Are you using the right period of time (at least 18 to 24 months) to properly achieve the results you are looking for?
  8. Have you considered indirect measures? (i.e. employee satisfaction or turnover)
  9. Are you measuring the coach on the results that the coach achieves or the time that the coach spends?
  10. Have you ensured that one of the measurements is perceived improvement, as viewed by those who work with the coachee on a frequent basis?
  11. Based on everything that you know about the person being coached, is there a reasonable probability for change?

What’s Most Important to You

When working with your coach, talk about your important needs—what really matters. Here are seven other tips to get the most from your coaching:

  1. Make space for feelings. Feelings drive behaviors. To change behaviors, change how you feel. Awareness is the first step.
  2. Simplify. Simplification also creates space, which allows you to learn and evolve.
  3. Make yourself a priority. Examine activities, environments, and attitudes that impact your energy. Identify ways to reduce drains and replenish your energy.
  4. Be curious and open. Be willing to examine your assumptions, ways of thinking, expectations, beliefs, and reactions.
  5. Practice mindfulness and awareness. Sensitize yourself to see and experience things quicker.
  6. Clarify goals and objectives. Ensure you and your coach are clear about your goals, short- and long-term.
  7. Improve feedback skills. Practice giving your coach feedback, especially at the end of each session.

Coaching is a developmental process. As you evolve, you will think differently. A more accurate and expanded personal vision of yourself—and your place in the world—will replace outdated beliefs and assumptions. You’ll learn how to accomplish more with less effort.

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist & Executive Coach
Trusted Leadership Advisor
Emotional intelligence and Mindful Leadership Consultant
San Francisco Bay Area and Beyond!

www.workingresources.com

mbrusman@workingresources.com

415-546-1252

I coach emotionally intelligent and mindful leaders to cultivate trust and full engagement in a purpose-driven culture who produce results.

Pause, Breathe, Be Present, Love, Open to Possibility, Cultivate a Meaningful Life
Live Deeply Into Your Magnificence and Our Shared Humanity in the Present Moment

 

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Emotionally Intelligent Leaders Lead with Lovehttps://consultingsociety.com/emotionally-intelligent-leaders-lead-with-love/Mon, 18 Apr 2022 03:40:59 +0000https://consultingsociety.com/?p=15462There is a growing urgency to strengthen manager-employee interpersonal relationships, and for some organizations, a shift or addition of a CPO. You see, at a minimum, the volatility we are experiencing creates stress for individuals, poor working relationships, and decreased productivity. Left unchecked, psychological abuse, violence, and ruin ensue. Great leaders can manage and even avoid these worst-case scenarios by leading with love.

The post Emotionally Intelligent Leaders Lead with Love appeared first on The Society for the Advancement of Consulting®.

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Lead with Love

As a business leader, how do you lead with love? How is love practiced in your organization?

Given the volatility of 2021, I’ve been exploring this facet of leadership. Tension and anger in the workplace is on the rise. Some HR researchers anticipate this will continue throughout 2022.

In a recent article published by Harvard Business Review (January 2022), eleven current trends foster ongoing workplace volatility. Some of the top issues leaders and managers will face include:

  1. Fairness and equity
  2. Vaccine mandates and testing
  3. Shorter work week
  4. Employee turnover
  5. Permanent shift to remote technology/tools
  6. Permanent hybrid work model
  7. Wellness tactics, technologies, and metrics
  8. The need for a Chief Purpose Officer (CPO)
  9. Manager-employee interpersonal relationships

There is a growing urgency to strengthen manager-employee interpersonal relationships, and for some organizations, a shift or addition of a CPO. You see, at a minimum, the volatility we are experiencing creates stress for individuals, poor working relationships, and decreased productivity. Left unchecked, psychological abuse, violence, and ruin ensue. Great leaders can manage and even avoid these worst-case scenarios by leading with love.

Our Need for Love

All humans need love: we need to be loved and nurtured, and we need to express love. It’s one of our most fundamental needs. And it’s no surprise that this need carries into the workplace. For many, having healthy business and professional relationships is a top goal. That’s why they practice love in the workplace.

Leading with love is doing the right thing, at the right time, in the right spirit (motivation). This type of love embodies courageousness, discernment, justice, and humility—it’s not about our natural preferences. Leaders who practice this type of love know that expressing love, empathy, and compassion is a mutually beneficial endeavor.

Even the smallest act of kindness can help meet our need for love. According to researchers, committing kindness over a seven-day period increases our sense of happiness. And, it matters not if it is offered to strangers, acquaintances, co-workers, or close friends—all have an equally positive effect.

Leadership, Love, and Blind Spots

When it comes to leadership and love, even the best leaders have blind spots. Generally speaking, this is a good thing: it can even a playing field. However, as Steven Snyder wrote in Leadership and the Art of Struggle, “Blind spots are the product of an overactive automatic mind and an underactive reflective mind.” This can be especially dangerous for leaders.

In Thinking Fast and Slow, psychologist and economist Daniel Kahneman describes how our fast, automatic mind reaches conclusions (re: judgments) quickly, typically prematurely, and frequently incorrectly; but our slow, reflective mind challenges assumptions, generates alternatives, and objectively evaluates and analyzes them.

Fast thinking happens frequently. And it’s understandable: slow thinking requires a lot of energy. Unfortunately, the alternative fast thinking does not address leadership blind spots, especially when it comes to self-perception.

You see, most of us have a blind spot for our good qualities and a magnifying glass for our flaws. Whether we recognize it or not, this can do a lot of damage to our confidence, happiness, and ability to love others. When we let our self-criticism go unchallenged, it not only causes more harm and suffering, it hurts those around us.

The more we deny these blind spots, the more miserable we become. This distorted image is not the truth; rather, it reinforces the inner dialogue that can keep us stuck. Instead, we can change the stories we tell ourselves that result from habitual fast thinking.

Practice Self-love

First, take a deep breath to slow your pace and clear your mind. Look at the whole picture. Instead of beating yourself up, think about how you would feel if your best friend had a similar flaw, made the same choice, or acted in a similar manner. From this perspective, it probably doesn’t look so bad, or whatever negative label you put on it.

Now, give yourself a break. Think back to something you recently did that was loving and kind. Allow yourself to linger in that memory to rebalance your feelings.

Then, practice forgiveness. One helpful technique is a loving-kindness meditation. Here is a very simple, basic meditation to start:

  • May I be happy
  • May I be well
  • May I be safe
  • May I be peaceful and at ease

The way we treat ourselves matters more than we realize. Self-compassion empowers us to work through different moments of life with more resilience and grace.

Extend Love at Work

The loving-kindness meditation published on Greater Good Science Center at Berkeley  is a helpful way to extend love at work. This meditation was created by Stanford University’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research Education, who define compassionate love as:

“…An attitude toward other(s), either close others or strangers or all of humanity; containing feelings, cognitions, and behaviors that are focused on caring, concern, tenderness, and an orientation toward supporting, helping, and understanding the other(s), particularly when the other(s) is (are) perceived to be suffering or in need.” (Sprecher & Fehr, 2005)

The Platinum Rule

People are starving for connection and hope amidst all of the uncertainty and fear we experienced over the past two years.

In light of these issues, it’s crucial for leadership to offer love using what anthropologist Dr. Helen Fisher describes as, The Platinum Rule: treat others not as you want to be treated (The Golden Rule), but as they want to be treated.

Ask, listen, confirm, offer, and if agreed, act.

Love What You Do at Work

According to a recently published article “Managing a Polarized Workforce,” (Harvard Business Review, March-April 2022), “conflict is an inescapable part of work life for employees at all levels.” Their recent survey of US companies reveals that 89% of respondents report experiencing conflict at work and “spend about 3.5 hours a week, on average, dealing with it.”

Given this environment, especially for those who do not thrive in conflict, how are we able to love what we do at work? It boils down to identifying that which is truly meaningful.

Language Matters

Language is powerful. It doesn’t merely describe, it shapes reality. Language becomes the filter through which we perceive the world.

When we talk about work that is truly meaningful, we are talking about the fundamental and essential human need of purpose. Many leaders have broadened their vocabulary to include words such as, “community, meaning, service, contribution, joy, passion, vocation, and soul,” knowing they are powerful, meaningful, and engaging. They understand that who you are and what you stand for are as important as what you do and sell.

Great leaders and managers tap into what is truly meaningful by daily asking (and answering) three questions.

Daily Engagement Questions

  1. What ignites my passion in today’s work? Reclaim your resources—energy, time, and attention—from the urgent to the meaningful.
  2. How can I bring true value to this moment? Disengage from emotional entanglements and take constructive action.
  3. What would I like my legacy to be in this assignment? Bring more value and meaning to a seemingly onerous task.

Managing (and meeting) external responsibilities while fulfilling internal goals is a process. A bit of self-talk can help reframe a task:  “If I do this, then:”

  1. “I’ll be one step closer to…”
  2. “I will free up time for…”
  3. “It will enable us to move forward to…”

Wise leadership teams also frequently ask and collectively answer:

  1. What brings meaning and community to our company?
  2. How can this meeting or project be an expression of our highest aims?
  3. What would be of service right now?
  4. How can this conversation be more open, clear, or authentic?
  5. What is our larger responsibility as a team or organization?

Not everyone thrives in the face of conflict. Instead, many prefer to avoid it. But, we know that when managed well, diverse and often opposing ideas can foster progress and innovation. The key is to remain curious, open-minded, and listen well.

Workplace Romance

On February 2, 2022, the president of CNN Worldwide publicly announced his resignation because he had failed to disclose a personal relationship with a CNN senior executive.  According to both parties, the relationship was consensual and had grown from professional, to personal, to intimate. This leads many to ask: when co-workers seek connection and friendship, should love or dating be verboten?

Views and opinions on workplace romance vary greatly depending on the size of the organization, the history (of the organization and the individual), and the perceived risk of intimate alliances. And so do company policies.

According to a 2018 survey conducted by Challenger, Gray & Christmas, and published by Harvard Law School, the number of close personal relationship policies is on the rise. They report that in 2017, more than 50% of respondents have formal, written policies and 78% discourage supervisor-subordinate relationships. However, this does not mean they have anti-fraternization policies. Why?

The Cons of Non-fraternization Policies

  • Grey areas: what is a close, personal relationship?
  • Enforcement: who monitors compliance?
  • Paternalism: should employers have the authority regarding personal matters?

Many of us have heard meet-cute stories that originated in the workplace. This is no surprise, given that 35-40% of those surveyed report having a workplace romance, and 72% would do so again. Surprisingly, 22% dated a supervisor. So would a non-fraternization policy prevent this?

The Pros of Non-fraternization Policies

  • Prevent sexual harassment
  • Mitigate organization’s legal risk
  • Curtail workplace favoritism/toxicity
  • Outline accountability processes and consequences

Clearly, there are multiple considerations, including the approach, the scope, and the consequences. While every employee should review their organization’s policies, leaders and managers should review for:

  • How does the policy address employee’s concerns?
  • What channels are in place to support employees? How can they report/disclose their intentions/status? Who must do this? (The more senior in the relationship?)
  • Where are the grey areas? Who is responsible for decisions in these areas?

Truly successful organizations are led with love; what is happening in your organization?

Dr. Maynard Brusman
Consulting Psychologist & Executive Coach
Trusted Leadership Advisor
Emotional intelligence and Mindful Leadership Consultant
San Francisco Bay Area and Beyond!
www.workingresources.com
mbrusman@workingresources.com
415-546-1252

Top 5 Clifton Strengths – Maximizer, Learner, Ideation, Strategic, Individualization
VIA Character Strengths – Love of Learning, Social Intelligence, Bravery, Gratitude, Appreciation of Beauty&Excellence

I coach emotionally intelligent and mindful leaders to cultivate trust and full engagement in a purpose-driven culture who produce results.

Pause, Breathe, Be Present, Love, Open to Possibility, Cultivate a Meaningful Life
Live Deeply Into Your Magnificence and Our Shared Humanity in the Present Moment

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Triad Tempo: Creating Quality Engagementhttps://consultingsociety.com/triad-tempo-creating-quality-engagement/Mon, 18 Apr 2022 03:40:15 +0000https://consultingsociety.com/?p=15566When it comes to online content in today’s transformed marketplace, you must have a strategy for who you reach, how you reach them, and what you want them to do next.

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The Triad Tempo is a strategy that yields impressive results for your team and business. What is it exactly?

One of the most important shifts in today’s sell-to marketplace is the role that online content now plays in attracting and retaining customers. It’s a Right on the Money must-do activity now.

But a lot of people still get it wrong. They assume they just need to pump out massive quantities of content and then sit back and wait for the phone to ring. That’s akin to throwing handfuls of seeds to the wind and praying for rain.

When it comes to online content in today’s transformed marketplace, you must have a strategy for who you reach, how you reach them, and what you want them to do next.

Building and executing that strategy is what I call the Triad Tempo, and I cover it at length in Chapter 4 of my new book, Right on the Money: New Principles for Bold Growth. In essence: it’s a strategy that increases sales while positioning sellers as a source of vital information and insights so buyers don’t waste hours searching aimlessly.

Your Triad Tempo creates quality engagement. It does that by anticipating well-qualified customers who have a lot of questions, who value their time, and who are highly selective of who they trust. And then it gives those people content that’s meaningful and encourages them to raise their hand to ask you questions.

Here’s how you get there. Once you’ve chosen your top three platforms (Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn, for example), you must create and publish three types of content.

Triad Tempo: The 3 Types of Content

1. Original, High-Value Material

This can be an article or video in which you offer insightful, forward-thinking views on current events relevant to your industry. You could also share a thought-provoking how-to tip as a status update or tweet. What you’re doing here is showcasing your thought leadership and creating a “tell-me-more” environment for your audience.

That’s what research companies like Gartner do. They freely share snippets of research (the full details of which are typically available at a considerable fee). It attracts people and engages them in the subject matter. And that engagement raises the value of the research work even further. It also stirs discussion and builds a sense of community. A software company client of mine regularly posts stories about the latest compliance regulations in their industry. They earn attention and status because they talk about issues that matter to their customers.

2. Share Great Material From Other Sources

The strength of your Triad Tempo is also determined by the quality of material you share from other sources. That can include timely news articles, witty anecdotes, and success stories. But never just click “share” without first providing context! Take a moment to write a sentence or two explaining why you think this is important for someone else to read.

Previously, I talked about an oil and gas client who regularly shares news about Tesla and self-driving car technology. Here’s another example: a smart agricultural consultant I know constantly posts articles—both for and against GMOs (genetically modified organisms). Regardless of which side of the argument his clients fall on, it stimulates conversation. And in doing so, that consultant keeps on capturing a broader share of the market than his competitors do.

3. Comment on—and Share—Your Customer’s/Prospect’s Articles or Posts

Don’t overthink this. It could be a simple question, a thought-provoking statement, or a congratulatory note. What’s important is that you let your customers know you’re listening to them. People often worry that following clients and sharing their information could be misconceived as stalking. It’s not. Buyers put content out there for the same reason you do: to get noticed. If they didn’t want that attention, they’d have kept it unpublished. By noticing and sharing, you build rapport. And when the time comes to buy, you’ll be top of mind.

Triad Tempo strategy and its three types of contnet

OUTCOME: QUOTA ATTAINMENT GOES UP

Looking at the three types of content you must publish with Triad Tempo, when you plot the engagement level (see illustration), sales go up commensurately. That outcome that I see regularly with my own clients is also backed by third-party field research.

A study of more than 10,000 companies by CSO Insights found total-quota attainment rises when more sellers are online, being social, and producing information for which buyers are looking. While average quota attainment was 57.7%, organizations that reported their content strategy needed significant work had below-average rates of quota attainment (only 51% of sellers hitting targets). Those who stated their content strategy met or exceeded expectations saw higher-than-average rates, with 70% of sellers hitting quotas. In other words: engagement takes work…and it really pays off.

Show up with quality material and be consistent. That’s the key to creating quality engagement with your customers. Triad Tempo is your framework for action. Repeat each of its actions three times a week, and you’ll quickly see how this strategy yields impressive results for your sales team and your business.

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The Dreaded Sales Prevention Departmenthttps://consultingsociety.com/the-dreaded-sales-prevention-department/Mon, 18 Apr 2022 03:39:03 +0000
News Media Interview Contact
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Title: Executive Director
Group: Society for the Advancement of Consulting
Dateline: Claremont, CA United States
Direct Phone: 909-630-3943
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