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American Public Transportation Association American Public Transportation Association
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Monday, March 16, 2020

 
American Public Transportation Associationhttps://www.apta.comAmerican Public Transportation AssociationThu, 13 Feb 2020 17:17:55 +0000en-UShourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4Reflections on Public Transportation and the Black Communityhttps://www.apta.com/reflections-on-public-transportation-and-the-black-community/Thu, 13 Feb 2020 15:20:51 +0000https://www.apta.com/?p=25647Adelee Marie Le Grand Vice President of Transit Planning/Chief Mobility Officer-SRTA/ATL Transdev North America Member, APTA Executive Committee First Vice Chair, APTA Diversity and Inclusion Council February is Black History Month, a time when the nation reflects on the contributions of the Black Community. Public transportation played an important part in Black History, specifically [...]

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Adelee Marie Le Grand
Vice President of Transit Planning/Chief Mobility Officer-SRTA/ATL
Transdev North America
Member, APTA Executive Committee
First Vice Chair, APTA Diversity and Inclusion Council

February is Black History Month, a time when the nation reflects on the contributions of the Black Community. Public transportation played an important part in Black History, specifically the 1960s Civil Rights Movement. We have all seen images of Rosa Parks on the bus and the Selma to Montgomery March on U.S. Route 80. In a way, public transportation is synonymous with freedom.

Public Transportation has certainly provided freedom for my family. In the 1950s, my grand- parents left Panama and came to the United States to start a new life for themselves and their family. My grand- father rode the train from Brooklyn to Manhattan to work in a bakery in Harlem. He needed to arrive by 4 a.m. every morning, and transit allowed him to do that. My grandmother rode the bus to the garment district to work on the line. My mother and her siblings took public transportation to school and then work after school. My grandparents were able to start a new life in a new country, provide for their family and send my mother to college. Public transportation helped them make this happen. This was the American Dream.

Public transportation also facilitated the next generation of freedom for my family. In the 1970s, my parents moved from Crown Heights, Brooklyn, to Laurelton, Queens. During that time, Laurelton was a Black, working-class community. My next-door neighbors, on both sides, worked for MTA, as well as several neighbors on my block. You see, back then having a job with the MTA meant having the means to provide better opportunities for your family. You could buy a house, take vacations, send your kids to college and retire with a pension. The American Dream.

Public transportation gave me the freedom to move around New York City. As a young person (in hindsight, maybe too young), I was able to move around my city freely with my friends. In elementary school, we would take the bus from Queens out to Long Island to watch the matinee movie on Saturday mornings (can’t imagine this happening today!). Since I had great transit access, I was able to attend High School in Manhattan and take the bus and train to school. My transit pass allowed me to visit my friends, who lived in different boroughs, whenever I felt the urge. My American Dream.

Public transportation became my profession and that is when I became aware of the unpleasant history of public transportation and the Black Community. In the 1950s and 1960s, investments in highway systems were used as tools for “urban renewal”. Black communities, like the 15th Ward in Syracuse, NY, and Overtown, Miami, were decimated by the construction of the highway projects. In Syracuse, the completion of I-81 displaced many people from the 15th Ward, an established Black Community. In Overtown, the home of D. A. Dorsey, first black millionaire of Miami, 50 percent of the population had to be displaced in order to construct an interchange between I-95, I-395 and State Highway 836. These are just two examples of several public transportation projects negatively impacting the Black Community, forcing people to leave their homes and the communities they built.

Public transportation professionals and others in the public sector realized that the practice—of using public transportation investments to negatively impact a group based on their race—were a problem. “Simple justice requires that public funds, to which all taxpayers of all races [colors, and national origins] contribute, not be spent in any fashion that encourages, entrenches, subsidizes or results in racial [color or national origin] discrimination,” said President John F. Kennedy in 1963. In 1964, the passage of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act prohibited discrimination based on race, color or national origin in programs or activities of any entity that received federal assistance. Title VI would ensure that discriminatory practices would no longer be allowed. The Black Community had protection. The American Dream.

Public transportation and its role in the Black Community is still a complicated subject. The industry provides great employment opportunities, the services provide access to all that communities have to offer, and the regulations are in place to protect the community from discriminatory practices. However, the Black Community is still being dis- placed due to the implementation of public transportation investments. Projects of every mode are redeveloping communities and making it nearly impossible for many people to remain in their communities. How did we get here again? In the past, these investments were used deliberately to displace the Black Community from certain areas. Today, the intention is to create a better environment. The Atlanta BeltLine, (a project that I spent a considerable amount of my professional career working on), has proven to be wildly successful, but the unintended consequence of success is becoming a hardship for the Black Community that resided in the neighborhoods surrounding the project. This type of displacement is occurring throughout the United States.

I don’t know all the solutions, but I will offer one. We must engage with the people who live in the communities we are planning for or working in. All groups must be actively engaged in the process to help understand the potential problems and identify sustainable solutions. Working together and helping each other is one solution that I offer. My American Dream.

Passenger Transport Commentary: February 10, 2020

[APTA’s Diversity and Inclusion Council aims to promote an inclusive culture at APTA that supports and celebrates the unique attributes and perspectives of APTA members. The council, which reports directly to the APTA Board of Directors and is led by APTA’s immediate past chair, serves as an advocate for advancing diversity and inclusion practices throughout the association and industry. It is guided by APTA’s Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan. All APTA members are welcome to join the council. Please contact Petra Mollet at pmollet@apta.com or Darnell Grisby at dgrisby@apta.com for more information.]

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]]>Transit as a Micromobility Manager: The Dayton RTA Experiencehttps://www.apta.com/dayton-rta-experience/https://www.apta.com/dayton-rta-experience/#respondFri, 31 Jan 2020 19:46:55 +0000https://www.apta.com/?p=25266The Takeaway The Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority (RTA) has taken a hands-on approach supporting the use of shared bikes and scooters in the last five years.  The authority has become the operator of Link, the local bikeshare system, and also the maintenance provider for Spin (owned by Ford) in its shared e-scooter deployment.  [...]

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The Takeaway

The Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority (RTA) has taken a hands-on approach supporting the use of shared bikes and scooters in the last five years.  The authority has become the operator of Link, the local bikeshare system, and also the maintenance provider for Spin (owned by Ford) in its shared e-scooter deployment.  At the end of 2019, 225 bikeshare bikes were available in 27 stati

ons in Dayton, as well as about 200 Spin e-scooters.  RTA is working toward integrating these vehicles into a comprehensive “Mobility-as-a-Service” offering that would be available through a single smart phone app.

The Setting

Dayton RTA is the public transportation provider in the Dayton region, including Ohio’s

Montgomery County and parts of Greene County.  The agency’s fleet of 263 vehicles includes buses, paratransit vehicles, and trolley buses that collectively serve over 30,000 trips daily.

“Micromobility” is a relatively recent term that refers to person-sized vehicles that have the potential to be shared, such as bikeshare, e-bikes, e-scooters, and electric skateboards.  Such vehicles have gained popularity in many urban areas in the 2010s, powered by the confluence of trends including widespread adoption of cell phones, the rapid improvement in electric batteries, and the declining rates of automobile ownership among younger urb

an adults.

In the mid-2010s many cities across the United States unveiled new bikeshare systems that allow riders to pay for annual or daily access to fleets of bikes that can be docked in a network of stations.  Leaders at RTA, the City of Dayton, and Bike Miami Valley (an advocacy group) were interested

in bringing the docked bikeshare model to Dayton, where they saw potential demand downtown and at the nearby University of Dayton campus.

RTA also envisioned bikeshare as a step toward an integrated network of mobility alternatives to the automobile, with transit as its backbone.

The Project

RTA partnered with the City of Dayton, Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission and Bike Miami Valley to launch Link, a docked bikeshare system, in 2015.  The city contributed $250,000 to cover capital costs for Link, which was matched by $800,000 in federal Congestion Mitigation and

Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) funding.

Dayton residents can pay $70 for an annual membership, which provides unlimited 30-minute rides on any of the 225 bikes available in the Link system (daily and monthly memberships are also available).

Members unlock a Link bike with their smart card or with a smartphone app.  In 2019 Link provided approximately 30,000 trips.

Customer service, administration, and onboarding new Link members is provided by Bike Miami Valley, a local non-profit.  RTA’s role is to maintain, rebalance, and repair the bikes.  RTA employs 2.5 FTE’s to handle those duties, with repairs done in the Wright Stop Bike Shop that RTA maintains on the ground floor of its headquarters in downtown Dayton.  The agency subsidizes Link with about $250,000 in funding per year.

In 2019, e-scooters gained popularity in cities across the country, and Ohio passed legislation empowering local jurisdictions to deploy them.  Wh

ile the City of Dayton was developing regulations to legalize e-scooters, RTA helped draft language to local regulations requiring that any permitted provider integrate with a MaaS platform of the city’s choosing (RTA has chosen to integrate with Transit app).

In a meeting with city officials and Spin RTA proposed that the transit agency provide maintenance for a shared e-scooter fleet deployment, since the agency was already providing similar services for Link.  Spin agreed and the two parties entered into a contract soon after.  Spin deployed around 150 scooters in August 2019, with another 75 added a month later.  From August 2019 through mid-January 2020, over 20,000 trips were taken on Spin’s e-scooters in Dayton, with minimal pushback from local residents.  The city bans scooters from being ridden between 9 p.m. and 7 a.m.

In a unique arrangement, Spin pays RTA to rebalance, recharge, and maintain its e-scooter fleet in Dayton (RTA does not provide a subsidy).  Spin maintains no staff in Dayton, but every few weeks a company employee travels from nearby Columbus to collect and replace broken scooters.  S

pin provides data to the City of Dayton about utilization and trip origins and destinations.

In 2020, RTA plans to add 100 e-bikes to the Link network, which will augment the fleet of 225 pedal bikes

already available. Link will also be transi

tioned away from a docked bikeshare model toward one that gives riders more flexibility with an expanded deployment of standard bicycle racks.

Outcomes  

Link and Spin have been popular in Dayton, though they provide a small fraction of RTA’s trips (the agency provides around 30,000 trips per day, roughly equivalent to

the number of Link rides in a year).  Strategically, Link and Spin services have helped RTA position itself as a multimodal MaaS provider in the Miami Valley, with integrated trip planning and ticketing available through partnerships with Masabi and Transit app.

Link and Spin show signs of a symbiotic relationship: Link ridership rose 35 percent year-over-year in September 2018, the first full month when Spin e-scooters we

re available in Dayton.

Looking ahead, RTA plans to integrate trip planning and payments for both Link and Spin into Transit app, which also provides mobile ticketing on RTA buses and demand response services.

Lessons Learned

Brandon Policicchio, RTA Chief Customer and Business Development Officer, says that RTA is generally pleased with its central role ma

naging operations of Link and Spin.  Both modes align well with RTA’s goals supporting MaaS and universal access to multimodal travel in the region.

If he could launch Link all over again, Policicchio says he would probably have RTA take on all roles of managing and maintaining Link

without requiring external partnerships, which he believes would streamline operations.  He also advises transit agencies considering e-scooter partnerships to spend time up front defining “success” with their provider partner.  In Dayton’s case, Spin considered the number of scooters deployed by 7 a.m.  to be a key success metric, while the city and RTA were more interested in shrinkage rates and maximizing utilization of available scooters.

Overall, RTA leadership encourages public transit agencies to consider taking an active role in catalyzing growth of shared micromobility in their regions.

Documents Available

Contract Between Spin and GDRTA

Agreement between GDRTA and Bike Miami Valley to manage operations of Link bikesharing program (with amendment)

Operations plan for Link bikesharing program

Roles and responsibilities overview for Link bikesharing program

Procurement agreement from City of Dayton, GDRTA, and Bike Miami Valley to launch Link bikesharing program

City of Dayton rules and regulations for electric micromobility

For further information please contact:  Art Guzzetti, APTA Vice President – Policy and Mobility at aguzzetti@apta.com.

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]]>https://www.apta.com/dayton-rta-experience/feed/0KCATA and Microtransithttps://www.apta.com/kcata-and-microtransit/https://www.apta.com/kcata-and-microtransit/#respondFri, 20 Sep 2019 16:07:49 +0000https://www.apta.com/?p=21042The TakeawayThe Kansas City Area Transportation Authority (KCATA) is now running its second pilot involving microtransit, shuttles whose schedules and routes can adjust based on changes in passenger demand. Microtransit’s supporters say it can provide better experiences for riders who can request a trip specific to their origin and destination, as well as lower costs [...]

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The Takeaway

The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority (KCATA) is now running its second pilot involving microtransit, shuttles whose schedules and routes can adjust based on changes in passenger demand. Microtransit’s supporters say it can provide better experiences for riders who can request a trip specific to their origin and destination, as well as lower costs for transit agencies able to substitute shuttles for full-sized bus service.

KCATA’s first microtransit pilot launched in March 2016 with a startup called Bridj. That pilot was terminated one year later at a cost of $1.3 million after providing 1,480 total rides. In January 2019, KCATA and Johnson County, KS launched a second pilot called RideKC Microtransit in partnership with TransLoc and Kansas City Taxi Group. Unlike the Bridj pilot, RIdeKC Microtransit offers off peak trips, door-to-door service, and reservations made via the web and phone. RideKC Microtransit’s monthly ridership has been more than 15 times higher than Bridj’s, and the project has been extended an additional six months with a new Saturday service. KCATA is currently determining the cost/rider compared with fixed-route service.

The Setting

kcata microtransit

The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority (KCATA) manages public transportation in the Kansas City metropolitan region, including seven counties across Missouri and Kansas. The agency provides about 42,000 trips per day on its fleet of bus, streetcar, and paratransit vehicles. Johnson County currently contracts with KCATA to manage the day-to- day activities of its public transportation network. While KCATA manages contracted service, Johnson County both funds and makes policy decisions regarding service provision in Johnson County.

With an interest in innovative approaches to transit, in mid-2010, KCATA leaders grew curious about micotransit, a term used to describe on-demand shuttle services that transport passengers within a limited geographical area. Microtransit service usually has no fixed schedule or route; instead riders request a trip in real time, usually through an app. Microtransit’s boosters argue that the service could provide a better customer experience while saving transit agencies money, compared with a fixed-route, full-sized bus. Skeptics have questioned whether the microtransit cost/rider can ultimately be competitive.

The Project

KCATA’s startup called Bridj came to the attention of KCATA’s then-CEO through an article in The Wall Street Journal. A cold email to the company’s executives led to an in-person meeting a week later, followed soon by a contract to launch a microtransit service using $1.3 million in local funds. Bridj began operating in March 2016, serving several neighborhoods as well as downtown Kansas City. The service was available only during weekday morning and afternoon rush hours, and passengers were required to download an app in order to book a trip. Bridj used an algorithm to adjust routes in real time, with passengers often required to walk a few blocks to or from their origin and destination. The shuttles, which were purchased by KCATA, could accommodate up to 12 passengers, and drivers were more formally dressed than those on fixed route services.

A total of 1,480 trips were provided during the year that the Bridj pilot was in operation at a cost of $1.3 million, equating to almost $1,000 per trip. Jameson Auten, KCATA’s SVP for Operations and Innovation, said that the agency gained valuable information about the potential users of micromobility services; more than half of riders were between 19 and 35 and four out of five made more than the local median income of $46,000. Lisa Womack, KCATA’s Director of Mobility Services, says that three of the primary reasons the Bridj pilot didn’t attract more riders were that few commuters knew about it; some customers resisted using an app; and neighborhoods serviced by Bridj already had access to a number of fixed-route services. Bridj went out of business in 2017.

KCATA and Johnson County soon had a chance to apply what it learned from the Bridj pilot to another microtransit project. TransLoc, a company owned by Ford, approached KCATA in 2018 with an unsolicited proposal. KCATA invited Johnson County, KS to join the conversation, and the county ultimately provided $250,000 for a six-month pilot called RideKC Microtransit. KCATA would provide planning and day-to-day management activities, Johnson County would provide the vehicles and program funding, TransLoc would provide software, and Kansas City Taxi Group would offer drivers and dispatch services. KC Microtransit launched in January 2019.

RideKC Microtransit trips had to originate and end within a 50-square mile area of Johnson County south of downtown Kansas City that was lightly serviced by fixed route buses (the eligible area included a transit center offering no-cost transfers downtown). The fare would be $1.50, the same as riding a bus. KC Microtransit started with three shuttles and grew to seven shuttles as of July 2019, with four or five in service on a given day. Some of the vehicles were originally purchased for the Bridj pilot.

RideKC Microtransit drew lessons from the Bridj pilot to make several important changes to the service design. Instead of limiting service to peak hours, RideKC Microtransit would be available weekdays between 6 AM and 8 PM, and the service would provide door to door service so that passengers didn’t have to walk to a stop. Rides could be requested through an app—but also through a web browser or with a phone call. RideKC and TransLoc also invested heavily in marketing the new service, with direct mail and in-person outreach at public spaces like malls.

Outcomes

kcata microtransit

Ridership in RideKC Microtransit has been much higher than during the Bridj pilot. From January to July 2019 over 12,800 trips were taken at a subsidy of around $20/rider (as of August 2019).

The agency is currently calculating the relative cost savings or expenditures vis a vis fixed route service. The agency is also preparing to survey riders about their experiences with KC Microtransit.

In July, Johnson County extended the pilot an additional six months, to January 2020. The city of Overland Park, KS provided additional funds to extend service on Saturday, with a goal of providing access to the city’s weekend farmer’s market. The RideKC Microtransit program has been popular with local officials and riders, and KCATA expects to expand the service area in the future, both in Johnson County and across the state border into Missouri.

Lessons Learned

KCATA’s Lisa Womack suggests that agencies considering microtransit decide up front what success measures they care most about, and then design their program to capture data to see if they are achieving targeted goals.

She says that the current service area of 50 square miles is a little too large to service with the current fleet, leading to occasional peak trip travel times of up to 60-90 minutes. She recommends agencies start with a smaller area at first, and make sure it is one that is lightly served by existing transit service that could negate the need for microtransit. She also recommends that agencies invest heavily in marketing; otherwise eligible riders may not learn of the offering.

For more information contact Art Guzzetti, APTA Vice President-Mobility Initiatives & Public Policy at aguzzetti@apta.com.

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Standards Newsletter, Double Issue 11 and 12https://www.apta.com/standards-newsletter-double-issue-11-and-12/Wed, 18 Sep 2019 14:01:47 +0000https://www.apta.com/?p=20810Get the latest information on the work being done by the public transit industry's standards development program. Message from the Chair | Association News | Standards Development Program | Collaboration | The ROI |  Recently Published Standards MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR Washington, DC - The Standards [...]

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Get the latest information on the work being done by the public transit industry’s standards development program.

Message from the Chair | Association News | Standards Development Program | Collaboration | The ROI |  Recently Published Standards

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Washington, DC – The Standards Development Oversight Council (SDOC) governs all activities related to APTA’s standards development. The SDOC provides overall direction for the development and maintenance of standards in the public transportation industry. It is imperative that the members of the committees and subcommittees review and approve document publication requests in a timely fashion. This is important to ensure that APTA standards development policies are being adhered to, which accelerates our document update process.

A new way for us to communicate is APTA’s latest innovation, APTAconnect, an online platform designed to increase member engagement. APTAconnect is more advanced and user-friendly than APTA’s earlier committee collaboration pages and will help you stay better engaged with colleagues between conferences and committee meetings.

The APTAconnect platform is for discussions, networking and collaboration. This is the place to ask questions and provide answers. It’s also a way to share best practices and learn from one another and provide an opportunity to share resources and documents. Meeting notices, agendas, and documents will be posted at www.APTAconnect.com.

APTA’s staff rolled out this initiative as a pilot to several committees and it was well received. If you are on an APTA committee, you have already been given access through your APTA account. I encourage you to visit your online communities and participate in the discussions to help make committee membership even more valuable. The shift from collaboration pages to APTAconnect might have some growing pains associated with changing from one application to another, so please be patient as we all work together to maximize the new service.

APTAconnect will be a great tool in moving more of our standards development activities to web conferences and conference calls, reducing the number of face-to-face meetings required to one a year. This tool also will reduce costs and travel time away from the office and give us the ability to accomplish much more between meetings.

ASSOCIATION NEWS

The APTAU 2019 “FutureView” Webinar Series

APTAU continues to offer its new, six-part marquee webinar series, FutureView, which brings together practitioners from all facets of our industry to analyze and address the most pressing challenges and opportunities facing public transportation today and into the future.

You can still register for the next FutureView webinar on “Increasing Bus Electrification in the Transit Industry – Workforce Implications”, from 3:00-4:15 p.m. ET on Wednesday, September 11. A recording will also be posted on APTA.com shortly after the live webinar.

APTAU’s in-house team of industry experts and renowned speakers from across the industry invite participants to join them in discussing such critical topics as travel behavior trends, mode loyalty, approaches to Mobility as a Service, public transit system vulnerabilities, emerging technologies, workforce development, strategies for building political support for public transportation and more. Through the FutureView series, APTA members share insights and best practices with their peers and discover strategies to better position their systems and businesses to capitalize on and define the changing mobility landscape. As an industry, we can write our own future. See what yours might look like with APTA’s FutureView!

You can view the first four webinars in the FutureView series at any time.

STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

Bus Transit Systems

The Brake and Chassis Working Group leadership hired a new contractor to accelerate the review and publishing of documents. The group had two full working sessions in the first half of 2019. They met Feb. 14-15 at the Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority facility in St. Petersburg, FL, and May 22-23 in Louisville, KY. The group successfully balloted four documents. Both APTA-BTS-BC-RP-008-18, Transit Bus Brake Valve Treadle Assembly Maintenance, and APTA BTS-BC-RP-001-05, Transit Bus In-Service Brake System Performance Testing, have gone through public comment and CEO review. The two others, Remanufacturing or Rebuilding of Transit Bus Brake and Chassis Components and Troubleshooting Transit Bus Air Systems, will complete public comment in September 2019. The contractor is making the final changes requested by the voting members and the document will be ready for public review. The group has scheduled its next meeting for Sept. 11-12 at Detroit DOT’s facilities to work on two topics: disc brake (on/off) and S-cam.

The Bus Rapid Transit Working Group held its first in-person meeting in Hartford, CT, Jan. 9-10, hosted by Connecticut DOT. The group reviewed six recommended practices and decided on how to approach the update of the documents. It decided to merge two of the documents into one, then the five subgroups began work on revising the documents. The full working group met Aug. 6-7 in Minneapolis, hosted by Metro Transit, where members continued progress on these documents.

The Bus Procurement Guidelines Working Group has completed its update of the new electric bus components, submitting the new section to the larger working group in February. The new section received more comments and revisions than anticipated from the larger working group membership. These comments were addressed via a series of four-hour conference calls and consensus was reached on several outstanding topics (surrounding warranty and other issues). The document is now ready for public comment. We anticipate a great deal of interest in the proposed document and the likelihood of receiving many comments to be reviewed.

Passenger Rail Equipment Safety Standards (PRESS)

The Construction and Structural Working Group continues to update several documents: APTA-PR-CS-S-006-98, Attachment Strength of Interior Fittings for Passenger Railroad Equipment; APTA-PR-CS-S-007-98, Fuel Tank Integrity on Non-Passenger Carrying Passenger Locomotives; APTA-PR-CS-S-011-99, Cab Crew Seating Design and Performance; APTA-PR-CS-S-012-02, Door Systems for New and Rebuilt Passenger Cars; APTA-PR-CS-S-015-99, Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys for Passenger Equipment Car Body Construction; APTA-PR-CS-S-016-99, Passenger Seats in Passenger Rail Cars; APTA-PR-CS-S-018-03, Fixed Workstation Tables in Passenger Rail Cars; APTA-PR-CS-RP-019, Pushback Couplers in Passenger Rail Equipment; and APTA-PR-CS-S-035-19, Alternative Design and Construction of Passenger Railroad Rolling Stock.

The Mechanical Working Group published several documents related to Passenger Electronic 26C Emulation Braking System—Performance Requirements, ECP Passenger Cable-Based Braking System—Performance Requirements, ECP Passenger Cable-Based Brake System Cable, Connectors & Junction Boxes—Performance Requirements, ECP Passenger Cable-Based Brake DC Power Supply—Performance Requirements, Intratrain Communication Requirements for ECP Cable-Based Passenger Train Control Systems, ECP Cable-Based and Passenger Emulation Braking System—Approval Procedure, ECP Passenger Cable-Based Braking System—Interoperability Procedure and ECP Passenger Brake System—Configuration Management.

The Inspection and Maintenance working groups advanced several documents to public comment, including a revised APTA PR-IM-S-001-98 Passenger Rail Equipment Battery System Periodic Inspection and Maintenance, APTA PR-IM-S-004-98 Passenger Car Handbrake Periodic Inspection and Maintenance, APTA PR-IM-S-006-98 Passenger Car Draft Gear Periodic Inspection and Maintenance, APTA PR-IM-S-008-98 Passenger Car Electrical Periodic Inspection and Maintenance, APTA PR-IM-S-009-98 Passenger Car Tread Brake Shoe and Disc Brake Pad Periodic Inspection and Maintenance, APTA PR-IM-S-010-98 Passenger Car Brake Disc and Disc Brake Unit Periodic Inspection and Maintenance, APTA PR-IM-S-014-99 Modification Methodology for the Periodic Inspection and Maintenance of Passenger Cars, and APTA PR-M-S-018-10 Powered Exterior Side Door System Design for New Passenger Cars.

Rail Transit Systems

The Operating Practices Working Group published the new recommended practice Crash and Fire Protected Inward and Outward Facing Audio and Image Recorders in Rail Transit Operating Compartments and revised previous recommended practices for Rail Transit System Customer Relations and Rail Transit Systems Station Procedures.

The Operating Practices Working Group has also revised the standards for Rail Transit System Emergency Management Requirements, Standard for Training Rail Operators, Standard for Train Operating Personnel Returning to Work, Standard for Train Operator Hours of Service, Transit Supervisory Program Requirements, and Standard for Fitness for Duty.

The Elevator and Escalator Technical Forum published revisions to recommended practices Heavy Duty Transportation System Escalator Design Guidelines and the recommended practice for Heavy Duty Machine Room Less Elevator Design Guidelines.

Security

The Security and Emergency Management Working Group continues to develop several documents related to emergency management programs, safe mail handling, continuity-of-operations-programs (COOP), security and emergency management aspects of special events, and emergency communication strategies. The group has balloted and advanced five documents for public comment: First Responder Familiarization of Transit Systems, Regional Emergency Planning and Participation in Mutual Aid, Creating an Alternative or Backup Operations Control Center, Suspension of Service of Public Transportation System, and Recovery and Shelter of Transit Vehicles and Nonrevenue Equipment During Emergencies.

The Infrastructure & Systems Security Working Group continues to review several documents, including Physical Security for Public Transit, Security Considerations for Public Transit, Station Security, and Security Risks.

The Enterprise Cybersecurity Working Group is preparing a recommended practice, Supply Chain, for working group ballot. Meanwhile, the Control and Communications Security Working Group is reviewing a proposal for expanding the use of its railcar white paper.

Sustainability and Urban Design

The Urban Design Working Group is updating APTA-SUDS-UD-RP-007-13, Integrating Art into Capital Projects. The group met in February to discuss final revisions to the document. It was sent for working group ballot in mid-March and was approved on April 10. The group is finalizing a recommended practice on Transit Urban Design Guidelines. It will be sent for working group ballot shortly after the editing process is completed and then sent for final approval. The group convened in Boston on July 31 to review existing Urban Design Standards documents and prioritize updating each.

The Sustainability Working Group continues to make progress on its update to APTA SUDS-CC-RP-002-11, Guidelines for Climate Action Planning. The group met in February and met again at the end of July to finalize the draft.

The Transit Asset Management Working Group published APTA SUDS-TAM-RP-005-19, Improving Asset Management Through Better Asset Information, and APTA SUDS-TAM-RP-004-19, Communicating Your Transit Asset Management Plan, in early 2019. Two documents are currently going through the publication development process: Building Internal Stakeholder Support for Your Asset Management Program and Communication and Coordination with External Stakeholders for Transit Asset Management. These documents are expected to be published by the end of 2019. The group met in August to discuss finalizing the Recommended Practice for Procuring Software to Support Transit Asset Management, as well as topics for new guidance.

COLLABORATION

The Path Forward

You don’t have to see the person you’re communicating with to share your thoughts. The use of email, texting, instant messaging, web conferencing, video chatting, and social media platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram make it possible to conduct discussions without being present for a meeting.

There are pros and cons for technology-based versus face-to-face communications for business professionals. The APTA Standards Development Program is moving forward using a technology-enabled model. While in-person communication is generally preferred by most members and permits better networking and social interactions, web conferencing, instant messaging, and email provide increased bandwidth for conducting discussions and accelerate the development process.

Time is the greatest barrier to our work. Finding a time when all stakeholders can meet in person to have a discussion is challenging. Technology-enabled discussions greatly reduce this factor by providing short, concise discussion opportunities, recordings, file sharing and information in real time, and allowing for continued discussions when the group is not convened. Face-to-face meetings will not be eliminated, but they will be curtailed to one meeting a year, and web or video conferencing will increase in addition to the use of collaboration tools like APTAconnect to share files and conduct curated conversations on various topics. These changes provide huge gains by reducing meeting and travel costs and they give stakeholders more time to provide their insights into the development of our documents.

THE ROI

Your Feedback Is Important!
What are the gaps in industry standards and federal regulations that you feel APTA Standards should address during Fiscal Year 2020? Please take a moment to complete this one-question micro survey.

FTA conducted an independent evaluation of APTA’s Standards Development Program in September 2018. Overall, results were positive, and the information below conveys stakeholders’ satisfaction rate.

Question: Does your organization see a cost or time savings benefit or value from the standards publications?

Cost or Time Savings Benefit Pie Chart

Question: Does your organization see a cost or time savings benefit or value from the standdards publications?

Cost or Time savings Benefit or Value from published APTA Standards documents

RECENTLY PUBLISHED STANDARDS

  • APTA SUDS-TAM-RP-004-19, Communicating Your Transit Asset Management Plan
  • APTA RT-OP-024-19, Crash and Fire Protected Inward and Outward Facing Audio and Image Recorders in Rail Transit Operating Compartments
  • APTA RT-EE-RP-001-02, Rev. 3 Heavy-Duty Escalator Design Guidelines
  • APTA RT-EE-RP-004-02, Rev. 3 Heavy-Duty Machine Room-Less Elevator Design Guidelines
  • APTA RT-OP-RP-008-04, Rev. 2 Rail Transit Customer Relations Programs
  • APTA RT-OP-RP-009-04, Rev. 2 Rail Transit System Station Procedures
  • APTA RT-OP-RP-019-14, Rev. 1 Rail Transit Operations Supervisor Program Requirements
  • APTA RT-OP-RP-015-09, Rev. 1 Train Operator Hours-of-Service Requirements
  • APTA SS-CCS-WP-005-19, Securing Control and Communications Systems in Transit Bus Vehicles and Supporting Infrastructure
  • APTA PR-M-S-020-17 R1, Passenger Electronic 26C Emulation Braking System—Performance Requirements
  • APTA PR-M-S-021-17 R1, ECP Passenger Cable-Based Braking System—Performance Requirements
  • APTA PR-M-S-022-19, ECP Passenger Cable-Based Brake System Cable, Connectors & Junction Boxes – Performance Requirements
  • APTA PR-M-S-023-19, ECP Passenger Cable-Based Brake DC Power Supply—Performance Requirements
  • APTA PR-M-S-024-19, Intratrain Communication Requirements for ECP Cable-Based Passenger Train Control Systems
  • APTA PR-M-S-025-19, ECP Cable-Based and Passenger Emulation Braking System—Approval Procedure
  • APTA PR-M-S-026-19, ECP Passenger Cable-Based Braking System—Interoperability Procedure
  • APTA PR-M-S-027-19, ECP Passenger Brake System—Configuration Management
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Public Review and Commenting Deadline Extended!https://www.apta.com/public-review-and-commenting-deadline-extended/Tue, 10 Sep 2019 20:12:35 +0000https://www.apta.com/?p=20629Due to the number of documents under review APTA has extended this public review and commenting period to Friday, September 13, 2019.

The post Public Review and Commenting Deadline Extended! appeared first on American Public Transportation Association.

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Due to the number of documents under review APTA has extended this public review and commenting period to Friday, September 13, 2019.

The post Public Review and Commenting Deadline Extended! appeared first on American Public Transportation Association.

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Sacramento RT and Micromobility Integrationhttps://www.apta.com/sacramento-rt-and-micromobility-integration/https://www.apta.com/sacramento-rt-and-micromobility-integration/#respondTue, 20 Aug 2019 18:37:55 +0000https://www.apta.com/?p=19852The Takeaway Sacramento Regional Transit District (SacRT) has adopted a groundbreaking micromobility strategy to address the “first mile/last mile problem.” The agency has partnered with JUMP, an electric micromobility provider, to offer on-demand access to and from light rail stations. SacRT has worked with JUMP to install charging bays inside light rail stations. These [...]

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The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) is a nonprofit international association of 1,500 public and private sector organizations which represent a $71 billion industry that directly employs 430,000 people and supports millions of private sector jobs. APTA members are engaged in the areas of bus, paratransit, light rail, commuter rail, subways, waterborne services, and intercity and high-speed passenger rail. This includes: transit systems; planning, design, construction, and finance firms; product and service providers; academic institutions; transit associations and state departments of transportation. APTA is the only association in North America that represents all modes of public transportation. APTA members serve the public interest by providing safe, efficient and economical transit services and products.

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Name: Chad Chitwood
Title: Director-Media Relations
Group: American Public Transportation Association
Dateline: Washington, DC United States
Direct Phone: (202) 496-4800
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