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416 – She does 100 things and does them all well: Tom interviews Nadia Holliday
From:
Tom Antion -- Internet Marketing Expert Tom Antion -- Internet Marketing Expert
For Immediate Release:
Dateline: Virginia Beach, VA
Thursday, March 25, 2021

 

Episode 416 – Nadia Holliday
[00:00:09] Welcome to Screw the Commute. The entrepreneurial podcast dedicated to getting you out of the car and into the money, with your host, lifelong entrepreneur and multimillionaire, Tom Antion.

[00:00:24] Hey everybody it's Tom here with episode four hundred and sixteen of Screw the Commute podcast. I am here with a fireball of a Lady Nadia Holliday's here. I met her on clubhouse and she latched on to me and I almost had to get bladder surgery because she wouldn't let me go, given good tips to the groups that she's in. And boy, will you see all the stuff this lady does. She does, I don't know, she can't possibly sleep because all the stuff that she's into. So bring her on in a minute. Hope you didn't miss episode 415, that was cell phone tips and automation. You know, I'm all about automating and so that you spend your time making products and selling stuff and taking care of customers and not, you know, fighting with your cell phone and computer. So I gave you a bunch more tips on cell phone tips and automation on Episode 415. And of course, any time you want to get to a past episode, you go to screwthecommute.com and then slash and then the episode number. That was 415. And I'm sure you'll want to keep track of this number 416 when I turn this lady loose on you.

[00:01:30] All right. So how'd you like to hear your own voice here on Screw the Commute? Well, if the show's helped you out at all or in your business or giving you ideas to help you start a business, we want to hear about it because it screwthecommute.com and look for a little blue sidebar that says send voicemail, click on it, talk into your phone or computer and tell me how the shows helped you and put your website in there so you can get a big shout out on a future episode of Screw the Commute. Now pick up a copy of our Automation eBook. We sell it for twenty seven bucks. And just one of the tips in this book, folks, has saved me seven and a half million keystrokes. And a lot of people say, well, you're just making that up, right? We actually estimated it a couple of years ago. So it's actually more than that now. OK, grab a copy of that book at screwthecommute.com/automatefree. And while you're over there, pick up a copy of our podcast app at screwthecommute.com/app. And you can put us on your cell phone and tablet and take us with you on the road.

[00:02:31] Now, I know people are freaking out because of the pandemic still and the kids are home and they're not at home. They're in school or not.

[00:02:38] You quit your job. You didn't have a job. Well, I feel for that for sure. But for 23 years since I've been teaching Internet marketing for small business, I have been railing against this. And it's an insurance policy that if you can sell online, none of this stuff is going to affect you. And it hasn't affected me or my students.

[00:02:58] So I formalized my training in the form of a school. It's the only licensed, dedicated Internet marketing school in the country, probably the world.

[00:03:05] It's at IMTCVA.org and you can get a complete scholarship to this school. If you're in my mentor program, we have people gifting it to their kids, grandchildren, nephews, nieces, and it's the best darn thing you could give them, because I'm really against the four year colleges nowadays that are ripping students off and then just teaching them how to protest. And then they they're competing for jobs at Starbucks. So I don't like that my stuff my school teaches hard core skills that every business on Earth needs all the stuff with the email marketing and blogs and chat box and social media and all product production, all the things, the digital things that you need to know so they can make money in a hurry and they won't be coming home living in your basement. So check it out. IMTCVA.org. It's distance learning. If you can hear my voice and speak English you can be in the school.

[00:04:02] But let's bring on the main event. Nadia Holliday's here, she's better known as the Wall Street chick turned realtor in the state of New York, and she's a two time self published author. Where do you hear the title of one of her books? Well, she's a playwright, a screenwriter and actress, an event host, serial entrepreneur, a financial consultant and a wealth builder. Now, here's a fun fact about Nadya that she'll tell us more about. She's bi lingual and that's Afro Latina. I never heard before. And she originally hailed from Baton Rouge. And you may have previously heard her on the radio. Nadia, are you ready to screw? The commute?

[00:04:44] Thank you for having me on. Oh, boy, I couldn't help but have you on this. You're about the most boisterous person I've heard on clubhouse.

[00:04:53] I try. I try. I try. Listen, I'm up off the plate. Lucky number for 16 that that number is going to bring you some luck.

[00:04:59] I suggest you go out to play it for someone that's for 16.

[00:05:03] Oh, yeah. I am lucky to have you on here. So so tell everybody what you're doing. I mean, you had a thriving business before the pandemic, so you had to pivot and do stuff. So Telmo, which what you've been doing.

[00:05:15] Ok, so about in twenty eighteen, I started a little drop shipping business by the name of NC collection, which is a double entendre because my name is actually Nadia. So it's a holiday. But I actually tell the people it means novelty closet and home goods. So it's a double entendre. It works for me. And one of my biggest sellers, believe it or not, our fur coats I dropship fur coats all the way from across the globe from China. Wow. And so we know at the beginning of the pandemic, that was one of the first things that they shut down was trade and, you know, people traveling in from China especially. And so obviously, my business took a big, big hit. Right. However, because I am a serial entrepreneur and I'm always thinking of ways to create another check, because whether I have a check coming in or not, the bills are certainly going to come in. And so what I said is, OK, what can I do, what do people mean because I find it, if you can sell what people need, you'll never go hungry. And I was like, OK, well, people need PPE. So I decided to pivot my business, stop selling birds and other luxury goods like art and whatnot. And I actually started to sell P and I was selling so much at one point that I got a contract with a nursing home out of Connecticut. And I was I pretty much become the entire supplier for Maslow gowns. The little footy's the head caps, gloves. And I was pretty much supplying them with everything that they needed for about the first, I would say, 60 days of the pandemic. And then I just kind of stopped because they started to stop things coming in. I'm not sure who was stopping it, but this is what I'm hearing that's stopping just for coming in. They were confiscating things because things were needed in certain places.

[00:06:54] And so at that point, if you only think about the dropship model, people have already paid me for these goods. I do not buy in bulk to hold to wholesale. So at that point, I decided to kind of like let that go. But yeah, it's very important to know how to pivot when you are in this space, because as we all learned, life can change literally in a minute. And whether it changes or not, like I said, the bills are still going to come in and they still have to be paid, that's for sure.

[00:07:20] And and now I met you on clubhouse at new social media. That's taken off like crazy. And you're in a particular group or you started a group with the group that I mentioned.

[00:07:33] Ok, so I am a part of an organization called The Wealth Builders, and we are a financial literacy platform. And we also have one of the biggest clubs, one clubhouse by the name of financial literacy. So if you are on clubhouse, you can catch me in there hosting calls every Tuesday at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, every Thursday at 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. And you stumbled into one of those rooms. And yeah, I love what you had to say. I know a lot of things, but I don't know everything. And digital marketing, even though I'm in the space, is definitely not my area of expertise. And so I know I'm not the only one. When I heard you suggested to talk to this man, I need more information. I know other people that need more information. And we had a wonderful call. I thank you for donating your time and your expertise. But Wealth Builders, it's super dope. We teach people about credit. We teach them about drop shipping and e-commerce. We also teach them about real estate and forex trading. And the goal is basically to empower people. And kind of like you, we're giving you an education that you're not going to find in a college. You're definitely not going to find it in a public high school. And sometimes, depending on the demographic that you come from, you're not going to find it in your household. And we're probably in the same space, just two different things. We're kind of doing the same thing. And I think that's also what attracted me. So you've never worked? I was once. I'm going to be an employee, I was an employee, and there's nothing wrong with being an employee, I just want to say that there's nothing wrong with being an employee. But once you find freedom and and to me, I define freedom as owning your time, owning all of your time. It's just it's it's a liberating feeling. And I don't ever look to be an employee again.

[00:09:09] I get it. I always say I hate the corporate life or it takes it to a committee meeting to take a leak.

[00:09:16] Yes, it's ridiculous. Oh, my gosh.

[00:09:18] I mean, I know somebody like you and somebody like me gets more done before breakfast than these executives get that in their whole career.

[00:09:26] This is a fact. This is a fact. Like that could have been an email. We do not need a meeting for that. There's definitely a lot of time wasting going on in corporate America. But, hey, the reason I say that I don't like employees is because these corporations cannot run without them. And a lot of them provide services or products that we need loving use. So I get it. Entrepreneurship is not for everyone. I definitely took a leap of faith when I decided to take, you know, just a leap in myself and sort of believe myself, like, hey, you can do this. You've got what it takes, but it's definitely not easy. And it's it's most certainly not for everyone. But I love it. And I was just excited to meet you because it's very rare that I meet somebody that has the same mindset in that regard.

[00:10:04] People always think, well, you need a cushion from corporate America and everything you do should revolve about being somebody's employee.

[00:10:11] And I'm just like, no, no, no, I don't want my employee right.

[00:10:17] I want to be the best entrepreneur I can. I don't necessarily want to spend thousands and thousands of dollars and years of education to become a better employee for someone else. I think not.

[00:10:27] So let's take you back a little bit. Were you entrepreneur? You said you were born from Baton Rouge and. Yes.

[00:10:35] And so were you an entrepreneurial child? Did you know?

[00:10:42] No, I was not. You know what? I'm actually a hypocrite because there was a point in my life I was like, I'm never going to have my own business. I'm never going to do that. Takes way too much time commitment. I'm just going to come up with somebody else's job, you know, punch the clock, do whatever I have to do, get my little check and go home about my business. And I did do that. I did that for ten years and then one Friday. And I'll never forget because it was a dress down Friday, I was like, I'm done with this. I can't ever work for anybody. And I walked out the door without a plan. Oh, really? Your last paycheck. But I walked out the door without a plan. I was like, OK, I'm going to figure out. I did a voluntary repossession of my car when I couldn't afford it anymore. I turned off my cable. And at this point, this was before people got savvy. So everybody's wi fi was open, just like piggy back on my neighbors wi fi, you know, eating ramen noodles and just trying to figure out what I was going to do with my life.

[00:11:31] And I honestly did not know what it was, but I knew it did not entail being an employee again. And I just found I found my way into so many amazing things with so many amazing spaces. But it definitely took me having are finding the courage to take a chance on myself. But my dad is an Army veteran. My mother's a retired. What was she, a registered nurse and she's Panamanian.

[00:11:54] So that's why that that little fun fact, she's what do you call Panamanian? She's from Panama. Panama, Panamanian.

[00:12:02] Ok, yeah. So when I was born, I was actually registered as a Panamanian born abroad and I had Panamanian citizenship, a dual citizenship, dual citizenship with America up until the age I was eighteen. And at that point I let my Panamanian citizenship go. But I was considered a Panamanian born abroad for the first eighteen years of my life. Well, even though I was still considered an American citizen by birth, I had that option, which was really cool.

[00:12:29] You had some interesting stuff going on with what you could read and write and speak.

[00:12:34] Yes. So this was the weirdest thing I left. Louisiana, Baton Rouge, when I was about four or five years old, I had did kindergarten or whatever age that is, I got to Panama and just had to learn to speak Spanish. So what ended up happening was I returned stateside at the age of nine. So at nine I had the bokat, the English vocabulary of a of a child that was in kindergarten. And I could not read or write in English at all, but I could speak and read or write Spanish. So I actually didn't learn to read or write in English until I was about nine or 10 years old. I probably didn't get really good or proficient at until I was about in high school. Like in English is a hard language. Let me say that English is a hard labor is so easy like it Spanish. It is what it sounds like. English is very hard.

[00:13:26] Well that's what everybody that speaks English says that Spanish and all the other languages.

[00:13:31] No, it's totally reversed. So you're right. So a lot of people. So I take it. I talk a lot. I write a lot. I speak a lot because there was a point in my time in my life what I couldn't do it. You know, your kids, it's kind of where we like minded people. So you can't read or write like reading. Right?

[00:13:47] Can I just say something? You're right. I just I could do it in another language. I really can.

[00:13:53] So I see. I got the I got everything I need in Spanish right here. Let's see if you can understand it.

[00:13:59] Ok, problemas the sponsor, por favor. A stupid old gringo.

[00:14:06] Speak speak slower, please. I'm a stupid American right here, because if you say something perfect.

[00:14:15] And that's all you can say, it comes back at you like a tsunami of speed, you know, because Spanish be like 100 miles hour.

[00:14:24] That is absolutely correct and absolutely right off the bat.

[00:14:27] Slow down. And then another time, this guy almost got me in trouble.

[00:14:31] This is years and years ago. He told me, get a Rolex watch. And if you get in trouble down in in Mexico, you can bribe your way out of it. And he said something like Puedo. Hogar or Hagar, one of the other, and it was the wrong one, it was like he says I can pay was one, which is that Wato Hegar?

[00:14:55] So you well, by God, I can pay it back out if I can hit.

[00:15:00] Exactly. That's what he tried the wrong one. So he's trying to tell me how to get out of things enough to tell I can hit you.

[00:15:12] So.

[00:15:13] So you skipped a lot of years there, though, because you've got some pretty high level training under your belt, don't you?

[00:15:20] I did a lot. So after I worked on Wall Street for ten years, I went to school for finance. I actually another fun fact, I dropped out in my third year when I found out I didn't actually need a degree in finance to be a stockbroker.

[00:15:32] What I needed was a series seven sixty three. Because one thing about me, Tom, I don't like to waste time. I like to go straight to the money. Right. Sounds like I don't even need this. Why am I here? Why am I paying these people. Let me go.

[00:15:42] I could get myself into an internship at Merrill Lynch, which my college advisor at the time thought that I was not qualified for. I got that for myself because I just kind of feel like I belonged anywhere I want to be. And that's that's what I like about it.

[00:15:57] And I got that done. And then after that, I got my salary. So to my sixty three and I was actually offered a position with JPMorgan. Am I interview like they didn't even let me leave. They gave me the job so I did that for ten years. I bounced around to a bunch of different firms and a bunch of different positions on Wall Street. And I learned a lot and I, I met a lot of good people, but ultimately I just I was not happy and I just knew that I could not sit down for another 20 or 30 years in front of six computers and three telephones, screaming obscenities at my clients and my coworkers like that, that there had to be more to life than that.

[00:16:32] And so I did that part of my life for, well, I someway somehow stumbled on the radio show.

[00:16:37] Forty five radio with Angela LipService before she was on with a five point one she had on a couple of times and something like she thought I was like very spunky and loud and fun. And so she had been on our show a couple of times. I got into writing blogs and then I wanted to go to law school. So I went back to school. I was like, OK, let me get my degree. I'm going to go to law school. But before I could even finish my entertainment career, I just sort of took off. I was on the radio. I started to write. I ended up writing, producing and directing a couple of shows on Broadway, but still considered off Broadway productions. Those were sold out. There were huge hit. I started to get all these invitations. I got an invite to go out to the Grammys. So I did that.

[00:17:16] And it was like my life took a hard left. And I'd like to say, fortunately for me, it never got back on track. Then I was out buying my first house and I was like, what do you do with all this attitude? Like was like, I'm a writer. Like you're a writer with all that attitude. I'm like, oh, you can be a stockbroker. And she's like, You ever sold a house? And I said, No. She's like, Do you want to sell a house? I said, I guess I could sell a house. I can probably sell anything. And so it was done. I became a realtor in the state of New York and real estate I love as much as I love writing.

[00:17:48] And actually at right now, today, I hold no positions on Wall Street. I do not treat it all. I think I have PTSD.

[00:17:54] Tom you think from from that experience?

[00:17:57] Yeah, just I've just burnt out and I tell you, it's different when you're doing it for yourself on your phone and you've got a few positions. But when you are on an international trading desk, like I was at Bear Stearns, it's a totally different ball game and it is exhausting. So I think that I'm just kind of like, you know what? I don't want to do that. I don't want to look at a ticker symbol. I don't want to look at the market. I'm just going to invest all my money in real estate. And I love it. I have a lot of fun with it. I get to teach a lot of people things that they never probably know otherwise. And I found that investing in real estate is a lot more fulfilling for me than the real estate market.

[00:18:31] I mean, the stock market, you might have to be one of those that PTSD, but you definitely aren't pissy because this nickname of yours, the Wall Street chick.

[00:18:46] Oh, man, I lived in DC. I got murdered. Try to send Chick and then the name of your book that I saw on Amazon, my first book.

[00:18:57] And I'll tell you also your fun fact that so the name of my first book was Are You Fierce? What is the name of my book? Are you focused and fabulous, are you fierce, focused and fabulous or just another dumb bitch?

[00:19:12] And let me tell you, I didn't even want to write that book. I put that book out because somebody found my blog.

[00:19:17] And a lot of some of your listeners may know her name is. She's a very popular type of urban noir writer. And somebody from her camp found my my blog long ago, which was I think it was called bitch about it. I think that was the name of my blog. And it was just kind of like a safe place where people could come and complain about their ordinary mundane lives, their friends, their boss, their relationships, like just come invent and get it off of your chest and somebody reach out to me from our campus. And, hey, we're trying to put together a book of short stories. We love your blog. Could you turn your blog into a book so that we can pitch it with with the rest of the books for this group? They were trying to do a book compiled of other short books, if that makes sense. So I said, sure, I'd love to. I love Zain. I love her work. I'd love to be a part of this. So I ended up turning my blog into a book, and that was the name that I came up with. But that book was not really meant to be. But at that point, they ended up not getting the book deal through a publisher. And I'm like, you know what? I might as well just throw it out there. I wrote it. I did it. You know, like, why shouldn't I put it out there?

[00:20:25] There's actually there's actually a name for that.

[00:20:28] It's called Looking Log to Book.

[00:20:30] So you go, Wow, you're a real looker.

[00:20:34] I'm about to add that to my bio blocker. Yeah, you're looking at a blocker, right? I'm a looker. Just so you know, at that level, I didn't know that there was a thing. Yeah.

[00:20:43] Hey, am I correct in thinking that you have a daughter?

[00:20:47] That I do have a daughter. I have an 18 year old.

[00:20:50] And are you making her into a crazy looker like you or what?

[00:20:55] My daughter is absolutely nothing like she is the she is.

[00:21:01] So let me tell you, she's scared to be if if a ray of sunshine could become a person, that would be my daughter. Wow. That's nice. She has even on her report cards, I'm like, are you her teachers or stuff? Like come into my room and you make my day better. I look like my teachers would have never said that. You are embarrassed. But she is. She is she is literally as sweet as pie. She's just amazing. And a part of the reason why I started my drop shipping business was for her, because she is what I say this because she says it's so cliche, but passion is her passion and her dream is to go to fight. And we live in such a competitive world. And I never wanted her to have to depend on someone else for a job. And so I said, OK, I'm going to create this company for you and I'm going to get it going. So if you go to college and graduate and there is no job waiting for you, you have a job of your own already. Yeah. Wow. And so that was really the reason why I'm it make so you have marketing, you know, you know how to do merchandising, you know how to pick out a summer line, a winter line.

[00:22:07] And I just wanted to have I wanted to give her the skills that she was going to need to go into the field that she is going to get into. Because I remember when it was my turn, my family, we didn't know anything about being a stockbroker. They didn't have any advice for me. It was like, why don't you be a lawyer? Why don't you be a doctor? Like, that's what we do. We're lawyers, we doctors. The stock stuff you're talking about is not we don't do that in this family. And I was out there on my own and I know how that felt. Kind of be like, OK, I don't have anybody to talk to. Nobody understands me. And I didn't want her to have that experience. And I don't know anything about fashion. So this was also a way of me learning about it and helping her to realize her dreams and goals as well.

[00:22:44] That's that's really, really awesome. I wish more more parents like you out there. So you think I try. So we got to take a brief sponsored break. When we come back, we're going to ask Nadya, what's a typical day look like for her since this pandemic's hit?

[00:22:58] I think you live in New York. And, yeah, that's kind of turning into a ghost town in Manhattan.

[00:23:04] But and then we'll ask her how she's doing this. I'm laughing at this dumb question, how she stays motivated. I think she needs unmotivated.

[00:23:16] So the folks about twenty three years ago, I kind of turned the Internet marketing guru world on its head and the people at my level were charging like 50 or 100 grand up front to teach him stuff. And I knew these guys they'd be hiding out in Panama. If you gave me fifty grand up front, they'd never, never help you. So I said, that's not good, I'm going to fix this.

[00:23:38] So I made him all mad because I charged a relatively small entry fee like ten percent of what they were charging.

[00:23:46] And then I tied my success to your success. So for me to get my fifty grand you have to make two hundred grand yet.

[00:23:53] And so people oh they love this. And seventeen hundred plus students later and twenty three years it's still going strong. It's the longest running, most successful, most unique mentor program of its kind ever.

[00:24:08] And I have no trouble saying that because I've triple dog dared people to put their program up against mine and nobody will because they'd be embarrassed because I'm a crazy fanatic but not quite as much as naughty. But I'm pretty crazy.

[00:24:22] And, you know, it's it's so unique in that you have an immersion weekend here at the great Internet Marketing Retreat Center. It's the only facility of its kind in the world. We have our own TV studio here. It's the biggest state that you live actually in the house for an immersion weekend with me. And everything is one on one. We don't believe in any group training because other than the retreat visit.

[00:24:46] But this is a year long program where you have unlimited access to me and all my staff on a one on one basis to tutor you, to teach you this stuff, because when if you're in with more advanced people, you're lost.

[00:24:59] If you're in with less advanced people, you're bored. So I hate that I want action.

[00:25:04] So it's all one on one.

[00:25:06] And then you also get a scholarship to my school. I told you about earlier that you can either use yourself for additional training or gift to someone, and it would be the best legacy gift you could ever give to a young person because there's no more.

[00:25:21] Gold watch is being given out through lucky if they spend, you know, 30 minutes, let alone 30 years at a company. So so I want the people not to come home and live with you in your basement because they're broke and can't find a job. So we don't allow that around here.

[00:25:38] So anyway, check it out. GreatInternetmarketingtraining.com to give me a call and very accessible. And we can talk about your future online and if your loved ones future on line.

[00:25:50] Let's get back to the main event. Madia Holliday. Here she is, the Wall Street chick turned reporter and 50 other things. And and see, I have no trouble with people that have done a lot of things because that's what screw the community is all about. If you're not in traffic making somebody else rich, you can live two or three lives. And it seems like nobody is doing that.

[00:26:11] So no idea what's what's a typical day look like for you nowadays other than the nine hours a day you spend on Forbath? Right.

[00:26:19] So right now, clubhouse definitely dominates most of my time. No, but a typical day for me. I wake up pretty early. I drop my mom off. Well, this is now since Colvert. Let me let me say that. So this is my first call because his ass is covered. So my mom is 70. I'm losing track. She's probably about seventy seven. Seventy six years old. And so some mornings I get up and I drop her off at about five fifteen in the morning. And if you know you know I hate morning. So this ruins my day drop of water. I drop her off at the bus. Sometimes she goes back into the city. I moved out of New York City about six years ago now. So some day she goes back into the city. She has to go early. So I'm up early to drive her to the bus, can get on the bus to go to the city.

[00:27:04] Not dangerous with those covered around trying to get you.

[00:27:07] Thank you. I need to get her on this call. Thank you. Because I'm tired of seeing it. I am tired of seeing as she don't get she don't care about me. She don't care. She just wants to go do what she's got to do. OK, so that happens a lot to three days a week. I'm dropping her off so she can go do what she does in the city then my daughter, because again, I'm paranoid. I did not want her on the bus and my daughter is actually getting two diplomas this year. She goes to a technical school for fashion interior design and she gets a program from that. I mean, she has a diploma from that program as well as her regular standard, you know, high school diploma. And they actually mandate it because they have to do in-person training that they attend on an alternating basis. So some day she's there two days a week, some days, three days a week. So the days that she has to go in, I get up and I drive her, OK? So that's how my morning usually starts. After that, I'm probably miserable and I'm good when I get over it, because you know what? Before all of this, my day didn't start till noon. I do not I have the do not disturb on my phone from about.

[00:28:09] Midnight to 10 a.m., and that's because I'm writing during that time, I'm sending emails during that time, but midnight to 10 a.m. is my time.

[00:28:18] I try to do everything between 10:00 p.m. and midnight, and I try to always be accessible to my to my real estate customers, my business partners. But I think that when you're an entrepreneur, it's very important that you carve out some time for yourself, because this is the issue. And I'm pretty sure you have this problem, too. When people realize you're an entrepreneur or you work from home, they automatically think you are available to talk to them all day to say, I was calling you, I was working. You don't have a job. I work for myself. Like my bills are just miraculously get paid. I do have to work. I work harder than you because while you were calling me, I'm trying to work. OK, so that's probably what a typical day looks like. I get up, I'm emailing my real estate clients, I'm sending out listings, I schedule open houses. I'm talking to other realtors. I'm talking with my broker about different short sales. I'm all clubhouse trying to moderate calls. I'm trying to enroll people to the Wealth Builder program so that they can become financially literate and say screw the commute and fire their boss and join us on the good life and the good life.

[00:29:21] So it can be pretty hectic some days. And that's without a production. You throw a production in there and listen, I'm going to go twenty four hours a day. I'm writing, I'm revising a script. I'm looking for locations. I'm booking flights, I'm booking hotels, I'm booking venues. I'm running what he calls casting calls. So when you throw all of that into production season, then it gets really crazy. I'm actually in preproduction right now to go into production in May, so I'm actually about to get on that twenty four seven schedule where if I'm lucky, I'll get about 30 minutes to an hour of sleep a day. But it is all good and I love it. I love it. I love real estate. I love producing. So this is my moment like this is when I go I signed the best. But I tell you what, after I shoot that in May, I'm probably you probably won't see me for about two months. I'll probably be comatose. I will definitely be cold.

[00:30:17] It keeps you going.

[00:30:18] So it does to tell them how they get a hold of you.

[00:30:21] Ok, so first things first. If you want to join my community and really be tapped in with me, just shoot me a text. You can shoot me a text at 917-809-2043 and just say screw the commute so that I can say hey hey, Tom. Some of you are wonderful, fabulous listener is reached out to me. And if you want to know a little bit about everything that I do, which is a little bit of a lot, if you want to look into some of the furs that I have for sells or the books that I have for sale, some of the real estate that I have for sale, or even if you're interested about my platform, the wealth builder is and you want to learn more about credit, real estate, forex, drop shipping, which is, again, Tom space. So if you're here, you definitely want to know about that. Follow me on Instagram. That's probably where you're going to get the biggest and best picture of who I am as a person, as a mother, as an entrepreneur. And you'll probably find out some things about me that you didn't know that you'll find out on that page. And that page is Nadia_Holliday not to be confused with what's on your calendar. So that's probably going to be the best, the best place for you guys to me. Reach out to me and definitely keep in touch because I'm going to be key to keeping in touch Tom I've got to come see this retreat. That's what I know. Tom.

[00:31:34] Yeah. Yeah it's you. You get lost in here. I didn't know how to get out the front door for several days.

[00:31:41] Listen, I enjoy exclusivity. This sounds like a great concept for my Instagram page and I'm all the way it.

[00:31:48] All right. Thanks so much for coming on.

[00:31:50] I really like hospitals and I think we're going to do some more on clubhouse together. Absolutely. Absolutely. I'm always there for you.

[00:31:58] So everybody, here's a perfect example.

[00:32:02] Somebody who just wants to do it goes and does it and then doesn't look back. And she does all these different things because you don't have to get pigeonholed. You don't have to get stuck in the dreaded job. So you thanks a lot.

[00:32:18] Thank you for having me, Tom. It's been a pleasure.

[00:32:20] Okay, everybody we'll catch you on the next episode. See ya later.

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