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NY Times Article Confirms Work of Doc Potter, Author of Cannabis for Seniors…
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Dr. Beverly Potter  --  Cannabis for Seniors Dr. Beverly Potter -- Cannabis for Seniors
Oakland , CA
Saturday, March 21, 2020


Cannabis for Seniors by Doc Potter
 

In an extensive article, the New York Times explored the use of Cannabis for Seniors, which is the title of Dr. Beverly Potter's book. Doc Potter's conclusions in her book, Cannabis for Seniors, are confirmed in a host of the article's conclusions. It is available at Amazon.com.

Here are the first three paragraphs of the article:

Ruth Brunn finally said yes to marijuana. She is 98.

She pops a green pill filled with cannabis oil into her mouth with a sip of vitamin water. Then Ms. Brunn, who has neuropathy, settles back in her wheelchair and waits for the jabbing pain in her shoulders, arms and hands to ebb.

"I don't feel high or stoned," she said. "All I know is I feel better when I take this."

Ms. Brunn will soon have company. The nursing home in New York City where she lives, the Hebrew Home at Riverdale, is taking the unusual step of helping its residents use medical marijuana under a new program to treat various illnesses with an alternative to prescription drugs. While the staff will not store or administer pot, residents are allowed to buy it from a dispensary, keep it in locked boxes in their rooms and take it on their own…

To read the entire article click on https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/19/nyregion/retirement-medicinal-marijuana.html?smid=nytcore-ipad-share&smprod=nytcore-ipad

Here are some of the concluding comments from various seniors quoted in the article:

Marcia Dunetz, 80, a retired art teacher who has Parkinson's, said she worried at first about what people would think. "It's got a stigma," she said. "People don't really believe you're not really getting high if you take it."

But she decided to try it anyway. Now, she no longer wakes up with headaches and feels less dizzy and nauseated. Her legs also do not freeze up as often.

For Ms. Brunn, the marijuana pills have worked so well that she has cut back on her other pain medication, morphine.

Her daughter, Faith Holman, 61, said the pills cost $240 a month, which is not covered by health insurance. Ms. Holman, who lives in New Jersey, also has to ask a family friend to go to the Yonkers dispensary.

"Obstacles had to be overcome," Ms. Holman said. "But I think she was meant to have it because everything has worked out."

 
Dr. Beverly Potter
Docpotter
Oakland, CA