Home > NewsRelease > Good Stuff to Know November 2016
Text
Good Stuff to Know November 2016
From:
Barbara Morris - Pharmacist - Writer - Aging Issues Barbara Morris - Pharmacist - Writer - Aging Issues
For Immediate Release:
Dateline: Escondido , CA
Sunday, July 22, 2018

 

* * * Highlights * * * 

Acupuncture reduces hot flashes for half of women, study finds * * * Math books * * * Early marijuana use associated with abnormal brain function, lower IQ * * * Food-poisoning bacteria may be behind Crohn’s disease * * * Cannabis excess linked to bone disease, fractures * * * Common prostate cancer treatment linked to later dementia, researcher says * * * New kind of local food grows in your own kitchen * * * Small dietary changes reduces cardiovascular disease risk by more than a quarter * * * Sun and seawater: Secret recipe for mass tomato production * * * Concern that radiation may contribute to development of Alzheimer’s * * * Regular dental visits may help prevent pneumonia, study shows

good stuff to know this monthAcupuncture reduces hot flashes for half of women, study finds

Hot flashes – the bane of existence for many women during menopause – can be reduced in frequency by almost half for about 50 percent of women over eight weeks of acupuncture treatment, according to scientists.

Math books

Kids or grandkids struggling with “new math”? Real world math books — the “old fashioned kind” are still available.

Early marijuana use associated with abnormal brain function, lower IQ

In a new study, scientists have discovered that early marijuana use may result in abnormal brain function and lower IQ.

Food-poisoning bacteria may be behind Crohn’s disease

People who retain a particular bacterium in their gut after a bout of food poisoning may be at an increased risk of developing Crohn’s disease later in life, according to a new study.

Cannabis excess linked to bone disease, fractures

People who regularly smoke large amounts of cannabis have reduced bone density and are more prone to fractures, research has found. The study also found that heavy cannabis users have a lower body weight and a reduced body mass index (BMI), which could contribute to thinning of their bones.

Hypothyroidism symptoms linger despite medication use, normal blood tests

New research gives hypothyroidism patients—who often feel dismissed and forgotten—evidence that their persistent symptoms are not just in their heads.

Common prostate cancer treatment linked to later dementia, researcher says

Men with prostate cancer who are treated with testosterone-lowering drugs are twice as likely to develop dementia within five years as prostate cancer patients whose testosterone levels are not tampered with, research shows.

New kind of local food grows in your own kitchen

A home appliance that grows the ingredients for a healthy meal within a week from plant cells is no longer science fiction. The first 3D-printed CellPod prototype is already producing harvests.

Small dietary changes reduces cardiovascular disease risk by more than a quarter

Exchanging few commercially regular-consumed food items with improved fat quality reduces total and LDL cholesterol. A new double-blind randomized controlled trial suggests almost 30% reduction in cardiovascular disease risk

Sun and seawater: Secret recipe for mass tomato production

A tomato farm that relies on the sun and seawater to produce more than 15,000 tons of fruit a year has been officially launched in South Australia.

Elder abuse under-identified in U.S. emergency departments

Elder abuse affects approximately 1 in 10 older adults in the United States and has far-reaching negative effects on physical and mental health. Victims of elder abuse, like other vulnerable populations, tend not to receive routine care from a primary care physician and often depend on the emergency department.

More American men with early-stage prostate cancer could opt out of immediate treatment

A new report on Swedish men with non-aggressive prostate cancer suggests that a lot more American men could safely choose to monitor their disease instead of seeking immediate radiation treatment or surgery.

Concern that radiation may contribute to development of Alzheimer’s

More humans than ever are exposed to higher levels of ionizing radiation from medical equipment, airplanes, etc. A new study suggests that this kind of radiation may be a confounding factor in the neurodegenerative disease Alzheimer’s.

Regular dental visits may help prevent pneumonia, study shows

That twice-yearly trip to the dentist could do more than keep teeth and gums healthy: It may decrease the risk of pneumonia by reducing bacteria in the mouth, suggests research.

 
 
 
Editor, Publisher
Escondido, CA
760-480-2710