Home > NewsRelease > Fatty Liver Disease Affects More Than the Liver- What You Need to Know About the Risk of Clotting if You Have a Fatty Liver
Text Graphics
Fatty Liver Disease Affects More Than the Liver- What You Need to Know About the Risk of Clotting if You Have a Fatty Liver
From:
Dr. Jonathan G. Stine, MD MSc, FACP Dr. Jonathan G. Stine, MD MSc, FACP
Hershey , PA
Thursday, March 26, 2020


Fatty Liver Disease Affects More Than the Liver- What You Need to Know About the Risk of Clotting if You Have a Fatty Liver
 

Worldwide, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease, affecting over 25% of the population. NAFLD is an umbrella term for a spectrum of disease states ranging from simple steatosis or fat in the liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) which is characterized by fat in the liver that results in inflammation and scar development. If NASH goes uncorrected it can lead to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease requiring lifesaving liver transplantation.

Beyond the risk of cirrhosis from fatty liver disease, other related medical problems are common outside the liver. One such problem is increased clotting in both the arteries and the veins. In general, patients with end-stage liver disease have increased rates of blood clots, however, this clotting risk is even greater in patients with NAFLD independent of liver disease stage. Patients with NAFLD have increased rates of heart attacks, strokes and blood clots in the legs, lungs and major blood vessels entering the liver. In fact, vascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with NAFLD.

A recent report from Drs. Margaret Spinosa and Jonathan G. Stine summarize the link between abnormal clotting and NAFLD including suggestions of how vascular disease can be lessened in this very common condition.

Exercise has a favorable effect on the body's clotting system. Moderate intensity exercise such as walking regularly improves the breakdown of blood clots in both healthy persons and those with cardiovascular disease. The benefit of exercise in NAFLD remains unexplored, however, clinical trials including the NASH Fitness Intervention in Thrombosis (NASHFit) Trial are underway investigating this possibility. Either way, all patients with fatty liver disease should be getting at least 150 minutes each week of moderate-intensity physical activity according to the Department of Health and Human Services, American College of Sports Medicine and American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

See the article in full here: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease- evidence for a thrombophilic state?

 
Dr. Jonathan G. Stine
Hershey, PA
717-531-1017
Other experts on these topics