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Everybody Talks (Crude): A Comprehensive List of Public Figures For and Against the Crude Export Ban
From:
Meg Jordan, PhD., RN, CWP -- Global Medicine Hunter (R) Meg Jordan, PhD., RN, CWP -- Global Medicine Hunter (R)
For Immediate Release:
Dateline: San Francisco , CA
Monday, May 18, 2015

 
Crude Oil Export Ban
These days it seems that everyone has something to say about lifting the crude export ban. How do you know who to listen to?
It’s an open mic session for supporters and opponents alike. But do the arguments in favor of holding onto this relic – a leftover from the 1970s, when domestic oil production had fallen off and we had endured the ignominy and economic challenges of the so-called Arab embargo – really stand up to scrutiny?
Let’s take a look at what’s being said. We first posted this compilation on November 3, and we’ll keep updating this as we hear of new statements, so be sure to suggest names in the Comments section below if you know of someone who hasn’t made the list.

Lift the Ban!
Comments on why the ban should be lifted.
Michael McDonald
Michael McDonald
Contributor, oilprice.com; Assistant Professor of Finance; Capital Structure and Investments Consultant

"Even as politicians in Washington look increasingly likely to vote and probably pass a deal regarding the Trans Pacific Partnership, one critical US good remains stymied by trade restrictions: oil... Now that the unconventional production has taken off though, the rationale for the ban no longer makes sense."

- Michael McDonald -

Rep. Steve Scalise
Rep. Steve Scalise
R-LA; House of Representatives Majority Whip

"[The export ban is] a relic of the 1970s whose time has come to pass."

- Rep. Steve Scalise -

Rep. Markwayne Mullin
Rep. Markwayne Mullin
R-OK

"[Removing the ban on crude oil exports with Rep. Barton's bill] brings stability to the industry, it brings stability to the market."

- Rep. Markwayne Mullin -

Don. G. Briggs
Don. G. Briggs
President, Louisiana Oil and Gas Association

"The US market is flooded with crude oil and the ban is actually prohibiting our nation from organically responding to a disruption, or over-production, in our very own crude oil supply... The EPCA was possibly reasonable and needed for 1975, but so was walking over to your television to turn the channels."

- Don. G. Briggs -

Gov. John Hickenlooper
Gov. John Hickenlooper
D-CO

"Ending the outdated and counterproductive ban on crude oil exports is the next logical step to ensuring that domestic producers continue to invest and that energy consumers benefit."

- Gov. John Hickenlooper -

Tracee Bentley
Tracee Bentley
Executive Director, Colorado Petroleum Council

"I think that Gov. Hickenlooper's support shows that the momentum is growing across the country for lifting this outdated ban on crude oil exports."

- Tracee Bentley -

The Dickinson Press
The Dickinson Press
Editorial Board

"Energy development in our country has arguably been the lone bright spot of our economy since the recession began. Remember, this all happened despite the White House doing almost everything in its power to curtail the very real potential of American energy independence — something that was almost unthinkable until this decade... Removing the trade embargo on crude oil and authorizing the Keystone XL pipeline would go a long way toward strengthening the industry and restoring lost jobs."

- The Dickinson Press -

Jeffrey Folks
Jeffrey Folks
Contributor, American Thinker; Independent Public Policy Professional

"The energy sector is in crisis, and Obama needs to step in — or, more accurately, step back — by cutting regulations, bans, and needless environmental delays that make US drilling less competitive... For the next president, however, a great opportunity exists — an opportunity so great that it will determine whether America is to continue as the world's leading economy and superpower, or whether it will become a second-rate nation, as many on the left wish it to be."

- Jeffrey Folks -

Lee Tillman
Lee Tillman
President and CEO, Marathon Oil Corporation

"The shale revolution has been among the greatest achievements in the history of American oil and natural gas, and stands as a testament to the spirit of technological and engineering innovation exemplified by the men and women of this great industry. American innovation has once again changed the game entirely ... But U.S. policies haven't kept up. The 1970s-era policy that bans oil exports is antiquated and rooted in a time of scarcity not abundance. To put it simply, the policy is destroying value and negatively impacting our economy, consumers and producers alike. Even in a time of low crude oil prices, addressing the crude oil export ban is crucial to our country and our allies around the world."

- Lee Tillman -

Charles McConnell
Charles McConnell
Executive Director, Energy & Environment Institute (E21); former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Energy

"I can tell you that by the next administration, whether it's Democrat or Republican, I don't believe it will matter, we will be exporting crude oil... [The US crude oil embargo does not match up to the policy of a country] that professes to be interested in global markets with supply and demand and free trade... The fact is that much of that crude oil is not well-suited for refineries in the United States, and better suited for refineries in places like Europe. They are much more technically suitable for the crude oil that we are now finding."

- Charles McConnell -

Gary Clyde Hufbauer
Gary Clyde Hufbauer
Reginald Jones Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics

"It's rare to find a policy that combines bad economics with harmful national security overtones and, at the same time, violates US obligations to the world trading system. But US restrictions on crude oil exports are just that rare bird... No country has launched a parallel case against the crude oil ban, but the president and Congress should not wait. They should amend US policy because it's the right thing to do — for the economy, for national security and to respect international obligations."

- Gary Clyde Hufbauer -

Dan Ervin
Dan Ervin
Associate Professor, Department of Economics and Finance - Perdue School of Business, Salisbury University

"With America's oil production increasing steadily, it is time to lift a ban on exports of crude oil. Only then will we be able to deal with the growing demand for oil and the economic and security challenges of the post-OPEC world... The administration and Congress can do nothing — or they can assert leadership. If the ban remains in place, oil production will decline, diminishing the great benefits of the shale revolution."

- Dan Ervin -

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp
Sen. Heidi Heitkamp
D-ND

"The antiquated policy that we're talking about today didn't have a lot of logic after we deregu-lated oil. And it has even less logic in the dangerous world that we live in today... We have an opportunity to say to our allies — whether it's Japan or Europe — don't worry about whether somebody is going to hold you hostage because we've got your back. But we can't have their back if we don't have the ability to export our crude oil."

- Sen. Heidi Heitkamp -

Ben Wolfgang
Ben Wolfgang
White House Reporter, The Washington Times

"The White House acknowledged last week that sending American crude oil abroad would not drive up domestic gas prices, a common refrain among export opponents... But unlike American natural gas ex-port projects — which President Obama has come to support and the Energy Department gradually has begun to allow — the administration has shown no signs of changing course on the crude oil ban, a relic from the early 1970s when global shortages led the federal government to guard U.S. fuel supplies and block exports."

- Ben Wolfgang -

Tom Duesterberg
Tom Duesterberg
Executive Director, Manufacturing and Society in the 21st Century, The Aspen Institute

"My view is to go ahead. You can do it with the stroke of a pen. Executive action is permissible in these circumstances... You don't necessarily need to pass a piece of legislation. That would be helpful, but once you lift the ban there's not much that stands in the way."

- Tom Duesterberg -

San Antonio Express-News
San Antonio Express-News
Editorial Board

"Times and circumstances have changed. The US is scheduled to overtake Saudi Arabia and Russia in oil production. Hydraulic fracturing reinvigorated the domestic oil industry. New markets could mean even more production. And that's jobs saved and created. Texas' congressional delegation should be on the front lines in this fight. Congress should lift the ban."

- San Antonio Express-News -

Steven Knight
Steven Knight
FX Markets Research Analyst, Blackwell Global

"Ultimately, rebalancing crude supply is a process which has a significant lead time and is complicated by restrictive legislation within the U.S. domestic market. It begs the question, at what point does the U.S. administration see the upside of ending a program that only benefits refineries and fails to support the fledgling shale oil market."

- Steven Knight -

Robert Dillon
Robert Dillon
Communications Director, US Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

"The problem we have now is that producers have to shut in production as prices remain low. Once prices come back up they'll start producing again, but this process creates a lot of volatility in the market... By lifting the ban, we remove that volatility and we remove uncertainty... Europe is begging us to export to them... By removing this ban, we increase price stability and we gain a lot of economic power."

- Robert Dillon -

John B. Hess
John B. Hess
Chief Executive Officer, Hess Corporation

"The ban on crude-oil exports is a relic of another time... Our neighbors Canada and Mexico produce oil and export it. Why not the US?"

- John B. Hess -

Rep. Henry Cuellar
Rep. Henry Cuellar
D-TX

"It's time for the crude oil ban to be lifted, allowing the US to compete in the global marketplace and reap the benefits of doing so, including hundreds of thousands of jobs—many of which will be in Texas. While I work with my friends across the aisle like Congressman Barton to ensure that the current, outdated bans on oil exports are lifted, I will also fight to ensure America's refineries have equal access to American oil— we cannot enact legislation that benefits only one portion of the energy sector while disadvantaging another to the benefit of foreign competitors."

- Rep. Henry Cuellar -

William Gilliam
William Gilliam
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Badlands NGLS, LLC

"You know some folks earlier expressing concern about domestic crude prices is right now and people are saying, 'Why is this happening?'...It is an interesting thing. Look at the amount of crude oil producing in the United States today versus ten years ago, yet we have exactly the same number of refineries. And we have a law against exporting crude. If we don't have some solutions for more refineries and the ability to exports, no matter how will we do with production, technology, this that the other thing, I fear that you know we could start seeing a real ceiling on crude prices in this country and it's a very artificial ceiling."

- William Gilliam -

Robert Bryce
Robert Bryce
Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute's Center for Energy Policy and the Environment

"When it comes to the issue of importing and exporting, the U.S. is already exporting roughly four million barrels per day of refined products. We are one of the biggest oil exporters in the world. Do we still import a lot? Sure we do. But we import and export a lot of things ... We are a country in theory that is based on free markets and free people, why would we want to be independent of the world's biggest market? The energy market. We need to be interdependent in the marketplace not independent."

- Robert Bryce -

The Denver Post
The Denver Post
Editorial Board

"...The U.S. continues to impose a ban on oil exports that was enacted in the 1970s in the wake of the Arab oil embargo. For years the ban was relatively harmless, but today it inhibits domestic production and should be lifted ... The president has the power to lift the ban on his own. Congress could do it, too. If they did, they'd be creating jobs and aiding consumers with a single stroke."

- The Denver Post -

Mitch Zacks
Mitch Zacks
Portfolio Manager, Zacks Investment Management

"In my view, however, the biggest story relating to crude oil is the one not being told: Why does the U.S. still have a 40-year old ban on exporting crude oil? ... While the supply dynamic and the market landscape have changed dramatically, the laws have not ... Lifting the export ban will likely help consumers ... In the U.S., there's one thing we know for sure: what helps the consumer helps the economy. Something we can all agree is a desired outcome."

- Mitch Zacks -

Leigh Thompson
Leigh Thompson
Policy Analyst, Armstrong Center for Energy and the Environment, Texas Policy Foundation

"For almost four decades the ban on crude oil exports has put American crude oil producers at the mercy of domestic refiners by limiting the market to which they can sell ... The U.S. is already a net exporter of refined oil and opening up the ability to export crude oil could provide a much more dynamic oil market. Simply, companies only drill if they can sell oil at a profit ... Many in Congress continue to oppose lifting the export ban, which belies their real motivation for its support — climate change politics ... Whether under the guise of a climate change plan or export ban, one thing is clear: continued federal intrusions on the free market threaten the continued success of energy production in Texas and across the country."

- Leigh Thompson -

Former Gov. Jeb Bush
Former Gov. Jeb Bush
R-FL

"Now is the time to pursue smart policies so that we can reindustrialize our economy and lift up working families who have been squeezed by stagnating wages and high prices ...Let's start by getting rid of the roadblocks to our energy economy — anything that keeps newfound energy supplies from reaching potential markets ....We need to end the decades-old policies that have hindered the export of liquefied natural gas and effectively banned the export of oil. Capitalizing on our status as the world's largest producer of natural gas and soon-to-be largest producer of oil will reduce our trade deficit and create even more manufacturing jobs."

- Former Gov. Jeb Bush -

Jason Grumet
Jason Grumet
Founder and President, Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC)

"BPC believes that Congress and the administration should take further steps to lift restrictions on U.S. crude oil exports. ... In general, lifting the ban will increase U.S. production. While no one can confidently predict the price impact of adding 1-2% of additional crude to the global market, the basic dynamics of supply and demand should give us all high confidence that increasing supply will ultimately lower the costs of crude and gasoline, and more importantly reduce the vulnerability of the global market to disruptions leading to price spikes."

- Jason Grumet -

Bloomberg
Bloomberg
The Editors

"The way to lessen U.S. vulnerability, however, is not to withdraw from the world oil market altogether (if that were even possible). It's to sell more of the U.S.'s expanding crude stores abroad. As a bigger player, the U.S. would have a greater influence on price ... So why not just lift the ban? Because members of Congress are basically afraid that if they were to do that, and the price of gasoline were to rise, they would get the blame. Balanced against the reward of a more stable and reliable energy market — and the reality of currently low gasoline prices — that doesn't seem such a huge risk. In any case, it's the kind of risk politicians are elected to take."

- Bloomberg -

Tim Cutt
Tim Cutt
President, Petroleum and Potash, BHP Billiton

"Thousands of jobs are at risk as one of the greatest engines of American employment and economic growth – the U.S. oil and gas industry – is being throttled back. U.S. crude oil has been trading near a 20% discount to the world market price due to a Nixon-era ban on the export of U.S. crude oil that is depriving America of much needed export income. We believe it is time for the U.S. Congress and the Obama Administration to work together to lift the ban on oil exports. "Give everyone a fair go," as they say in Australia."

- Tim Cutt -

Tony Starkey
Tony Starkey
Manager, Energy Analysis, BENTEK Energy

"The US crude oil market has finally hit the proverbial wall that Bentek Energy has long predicted would arise as a result of persistent supply growth. Traditional demand sources are struggling to absorb this growing supply, made evident by crude inventories that are surging higher at unprecedented rates. Domestic production, however, remains captive in the US due to antiquated policies that limit the exports of domestically produced crude. Growing US supply has led to depressed prices, signaling to the market that the US is surpassing demand needs at today's production level of 9.4 MMb/d. Exports to the globe, therefore, are the last significant demand source for US crude. Unchanged, the current US crude export policy signals the end of growth in North America's shale crude revolution."

- Tony Starkey -

Grant Taylor
Grant Taylor
President and Chief Executive Officer, Hobbs Chamber of Commerce, New Mexico

"I think it would be hugely beneficial for this region to have [the crude oil export] ban lifted ... There's a demand for the oil we produce, and we do have the supply that's inhibited from being sold to global markets from this ban."

- Grant Taylor -

Rep. Larry Scott
Rep. Larry Scott
R-NM

"There's a surplus of oil here that can be marketed at world prices, [and that would bring more money for the state's budget]."

- Rep. Larry Scott -

Dr. Gary Wolfram
Dr. Gary Wolfram
William E. Simon Professor of Economics and Public Policy, Director of Economics, Hillsdale College; President, Hillsdale Policy Group

"Unfortunately, a 40-year-old statute, the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, doesn't allow oil companies to export crude oil without specific permission from the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) within the Department of Commerce... aside from being outdated, it has resulted in economic distortions that have become readily apparent in recent years... Repealing the outdated and inefficient export ban – a measure that made little economic sense even when it was enacted in 1975 – would improve the US economy and strengthen the negotiating position of the West in world that has become increasingly contentious."

- Dr. Gary Wolfram -

Alex Martinelli
Alex Martinelli
Editor, Energy and Capital

"The situation is complicated, but if done properly, a lifting of the ban could pay huge dividends, not just for investors but for the entire North American energy industry... With oil prices low, US drillers need any cost advantage they can get to stay in business, and if oil exports are legalized, the price relief could give North America a stronger grip on the global industry... Beyond the cost advantage, US oil exports would greatly benefit our allies, who are at risk of shortages and supply squeezes because of turmoil in the Middle East."

- Alex Martinelli -

Sen. Robert Nichols
Sen. Robert Nichols
R-TX

"Numerous studies have found that removing the ban on crude oil and allowing American ex-ports into the global market will greatly benefit U.S. trade and American consumers while also creating more jobs and opportunities for Texans."

- Sen. Robert Nichols -

Steve Forbes
Steve Forbes
Chairman and Editor-in-Chief, Forbes Media

"Antiquated restrictions on oil and gas exports are especially harmful now. Our oil storage ca-pacity has peaked, which means oil fields will have to cut production because there's no place to store the stuff. It's one thing when lower prices or less demand affect output; it's quite another when production is reduced be-cause of artificial, government-caused reasons. Repealing these prohibitions would not only lead to more demand from overseas for our oil and gas but also bring closer the day that the US becomes the world's leading energy producer According to one report, between 394,000 and 859,000 US jobs could be created by lifting these export bans. Americans would receive lower long-term energy prices, and increased US energy output would make the world a safer place."

- Steve Forbes -

Mayor Jay Dean
Mayor Jay Dean
Longview, Texas

"The people that make [a] piece of chocolate can send it and sell it anywhere. Why is it that the people that spend their money to produce oil, they are limited to sell their product? ... Why do we continue to work with 45-, 50-year-old legislation that doesn't fit anymore? Our technology to reach oil and gas deposits like never before has outpaced the demand probably by at least 10 years."

- Mayor Jay Dean -

Rep. Louie Gohmert
Rep. Louie Gohmert
R-TX

"[House Resolution 1487, known as the American Energy Renaissance Act, that I co-sponsored], contains a provision which would repeal the statutory and regulatory limitations on crude oil exports and require approval of export licenses, except for export to countries subject to sanctions or trade restrictions imposed by the United States, or those designated for exclusion by the president or Congress for reasons of national security."

- Rep. Louie Gohmert -

Rep. Steve Pearce
Rep. Steve Pearce
R-NM

"Perhaps no other state in the nation has a bigger stake in robust oil and gas production than New Mexico. But that stake is at serious risk due to the inability of our state's oil producers to find enough cus-tomers to buy their now abundant supply... The reason: In the 1970s, during the Arab oil embargo that ignited a US energy crisis, Congress enacted laws prohibiting domestically produced crude oil from being exported. ... Oil and gas production is the lifeblood of New Mexico's economy: 69,000 jobs – 9 percent of all New Mexican employment – are tied to oil and gas development. In 2013, state revenue from oil and gas accounted for 31.5 percent of the state's general fund and was directly responsible for paying for 85 percent of the state's capital projects... In 2014, oil and gas was directly responsible for generating $726 million for schools, universities and public hospitals... Specifically, the export ban translates into lost jobs, lost taxes and decreased royalties; losses with heavy consequences for New Mexico. It is time to lift the destructive oil export ban. Washington should deliver this win-win for the nation and New Mexico."

- Rep. Steve Pearce -

Robin West
Robin West
Senior Adviser—Energy and National Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies

"[The export ban restrictions are] helping OPEC to smother US production, which is bad for our economy as well as our energy security."

- Robin West -

Rep. Brooks Landgraf
Rep. Brooks Landgraf
R-TX

"A repeal of the crude oil export ban would help our economy here in the Permian Basin and it would also strengthen the geopolitical standing of the United States in the world... To help with the effort, I have co-authored legislation in the Texas House of Representatives (H.C.R. 57) urging Congress to lift the ban on American crude oil exports. ...When America exports our crude oil to the rest of the world, we will strengthen our geopolitical influence. America's allies across the globe will benefit from a diversified oil supply... Better yet, if the United States becomes a crude oil exporter, it will serve to weaken the influence of OPEC, an organization that bears responsibility for manipulating global prices, which has harmed our economy here in West Texas... America operates best under a system of free enterprise and open markets. I am proud to support a repeal of the outdated crude oil export ban, and I urge Congress to promptly repeal the current law."

- Rep. Brooks Landgraf -

Rick Perry
Rick Perry
Former Governor of Texas

"I would get North America in the worldwide energy business in a big way... I think it is a major error we are making not allowing our crude to be used... If energy is going to be used as a weapon, we need to have the largest arsenal."

- Rick Perry -

North Dakota Legislative Assembly
North Dakota Legislative Assembly

"The 1970s saw high oil prices as a result of OPEC nations withholding production and a need to increase domestic energy production and supply to provide for energy independence... The reasons for the prohibition were to preserve domestic price ceilings by preventing domestic producers from receiving higher world oil prices and to preserve a depleting domestic reserve... Directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies in the Bakken Formation and other shale plays in the United States have made the United States more crude oil independent... The continued oil production in this region and across the United States has provided the opportunity for economic growth and stability through the export of crude oil and the prohibition on exports of crude oil is no longer necessary... The Sixty-forth Legislative Assembly urges the Congress of the United States to lift the prohibition on the export of crude oil from the United States."

- North Dakota Legislative Assembly -

Judd Gregg
Judd Gregg
Former Governor and three-term Senator of New Hampshire

"The United States holds most of the cards because we have a great deal of oil. The problem is that we cannot play those cards on the world stage because of our outdated and counter-productive policy banning exports... Lifting the ban on exporting oil in the first place is very attractive to the energy producing regions... It would also be nice for the country, as it would generate a massive shift in our balance of trade accounts which have been running in the negative for three decades now, primarily due to oil imports... This would essentially mean that instead of sending money out to the country to support other economies, we would be getting other nations' money into the country to build our own economy."

- Judd Gregg -

Rye Druzin
Rye Druzin
Business Reporter, Midland (Texas) Reporter-Telegram

"A possible release valve for America's supply glut is the lifting of the decades-old oil export ban, which has hobbled U.S. producers' ability to send excess crude to European refineries to be processed, creating the supply backlog that is filling storage containers and ships from Cushing, Oklahoma, to the gulf. Falling production in US oil fields may also alleviate some of the supply pressure if producers decide to not tap the oil that is ready to be produced. Such decisions would cement the United State's status as the world's new swing producer."

- Rye Druzin -

Kenneth B. Medlock III
Kenneth B. Medlock III
Fellow in Energy and Resource Economics and Senior Director, Center for Energy Studies, Rice University Baker Institute for Public Policy

"Opening foreign markets to US crude would facilitate new investments in the upstream and midstream sectors, as domestic oil prices would move into greater parity with other international crudes... Coun-terintuitive to some, removing the ban generates distinct energy security benefits... Some have argued that crude oil exports would increase gasoline prices in the US. However, because refined products, such as gasoline, can be freely exported, the prices of refined products sold in the US are in parity with international refined product prices. Thus, the discounted prices of oil produced in the US are not reflected in USgasoline and refined product prices. Thus, removing the crude export ban, although it would raise the price of crude oil domestically, would not increase the price of gasoline in the US."

- Kenneth B. Medlock III -

David Fessler
David Fessler
Managing Editor of "Peak Energy Strategist" and Energy and Infrastructure Strategist, The Oxford Club

"What we really need to end volatility is the ability to export American crude oil... Now America finds itself between a rock and a hard place. Here we are with all this wonderful, light, sweet crude that we are unable to turn into finished products... and we can't even export it... If we lift the embargo, WTI prices would flip-flop with Brent. This would have a positive effect on the US balance of trade. Our exports would increase by bil-lions of dollars per year... Of course, none of this can happen without agreement between the president and Congress - a change in sentiment that I'm not expecting anytime soon... Even if it is for our common good."

- David Fessler -

Morris Beschloss
Morris Beschloss
Global Economist Analyst

"The tragedy of current 'US embargo' policies is speeding up the process of dismantling the previous growth intensity of fracking, with an ultimate potential of 15 to 20 million barrels a day and total energy independence within a decade... While the current embargo's retention is supported by political segments in the Administration and Congress, due to the fear of higher gasoline prices, this is a misconception, since such a resumption of fracking production would keep gasoline prices in check... A lifting of the embargo would greatly enhance the production of domestic WTI oil and increase both employment and revenues, as well as expansion of the US economy. This owes much of its current growth to 'fracking expansion,' only beginning to be exploited currently."

- Morris Beschloss -

Elizabeth Rosenberg
Elizabeth Rosenberg
Senior Fellow and Director of the Energy, Economics and Security Program, Center for a New American Security

"In a domestic market awash with oil, keeping 1970s-era export restrictions in place discriminates against US producers and threatens investment in new supply, thereby jeopardizing economic, security, and trade gains from the energy boom... Policymakers should lift the oil export ban to bring export policy in line with present market circumstances, to promote free trade and responsible growth in the sector, and to reap the geopolitical advantages of having a larger and more flexible role in the global oil market."

- Elizabeth Rosenberg -

Doug Suttles
Doug Suttles
President and Chief Executive Officer, Encana

"[Lifting the ban is] pro-consumer, it is pro the economy, it's pro national security, and it is a bi-partisan issue... If the ban were removed, it would encourage up to $1 trillion of investment, increasing jobs in all areas of the economy."

- Doug Suttles -

Larry Wall
Larry Wall
Contributor, Cray24 Political News; former Director of Public Affairs, Louisiana Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association

"Politicians are interested in lifting the export ban. The Senate Energy Committee is scheduling a hearing on the issue... However, neither Congress nor the White House is willing to risk the political backlash of changing a policy that was sold as protecting consumers... Let this be a wake-up call. The policy never worked. It is not working now. Lawmakers need to accept the fact that a decision, made more than 40-years ago, is not working, has not worked and most likely will never work... Once that becomes clear, the rest is easy."

- Larry Wall -

Deborah Yedlin
Deborah Yedlin
Business Columnist, Calgary Herald

"What needs to happen — sooner rather than later — is for the US to lift the archaic oil export ban that's been in place since the Nixon administration and the oil crisis of the early 1970s."

- Deborah Yedlin -

Velda Addison
Velda Addison
Associate Editor (E&P), Hart Energy Publishing

"As the drop in oil prices continues to hit oil and gas companies' profits resulting in project delays and layoffs, it is only a matter of time before the industry's pain trickles to the coffers of local, state and federal governments ... Maybe then the push to lift the crude oil export ban will gain momentum. But hopefully, the powers that be will see the benefits of the move and make the change before economies fall into the doldrums."

- Velda Addison -

Sen. Bill Cassidy
Sen. Bill Cassidy
R-LA

"CBO's estimating that our GDP will grow by 2 percent over the next five or six years, it's awful ... We can increase it by 1 percent just with exports."

- Sen. Bill Cassidy -

Sen. Steve Daines
Sen. Steve Daines
R-MT

"Many of the world's energy resources are in unstable regions... I do believe the world should rely more on American energy, instead of Russia or the Middle East."

- Sen. Steve Daines -

Hon. Michele Flournoy
Hon. Michele Flournoy
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Center for a New American Security; former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy

"Policymakers in the United States should embrace these various benefits to our allies and ourselves and liberalize our crude export rules... Market conditions merit such a step and security dividends will not be fully realized without it."

- Hon. Michele Flournoy -

Kevin Allison
Kevin Allison
Journalist, Business Standard

"Some shale drillers may well change tack were a barrel to sell for $60. That's the level the most efficient drillers, like EOG, need to justify upping investment. It is, though, 36% above the current WTI price, whereas Brent is only 13% shy... Lifting the export ban ought to remove some, if not all, of that disparity. US drillers competing on a level playing field with the rest of the world's oil producers would not just be able to take better advantage of an eventual recovery in prices. They would also not be as exposed to further pain. Preventing foreign sales is an outdated policy as it is. Ending it is fast becoming a job-saving necessity."

- Kevin Allison -

Christi Craddick
Christi Craddick
Chairman, Texas Railroad Commission

"The US crude oil export ban that was put into place decades ago no longer makes sense in current times...While trade restrictions put a strain on this important American industry and threaten future oil production, expanding markets for U.S. crude oil will incentivize production and create a more vibrant energy sector."

- Christi Craddick -

Rep. Drew Darby
Rep. Drew Darby
R-TX

"Congress should update our national trade policy to benefit Texas producers and consumers."

- Rep. Drew Darby -

Theodore W. Kassinger
Theodore W. Kassinger
Partner, O'Melveny & Myers LLP; former Deputy Secretary and General Counsel, US Department of Commerce

"The policy rationale for the ban no longer exists, and there are compelling economic and na-tional security reasons for lifting the ban at some point... I think it will happen. When it will happen is a bigger question... We don't need all this light crude oil that is being produced... It can't actually be efficiently absorbed. So it makes the most sense, from a US policy perspective, to sell what we don't need and buy what we want to buy."

- Theodore W. Kassinger -

Ryan Sitton
Ryan Sitton
Commissioner, Texas Railroad Commission

"The growth in production in Texas and the United States over the last six years has dwarfed production in other countries... We are in a position to establish a new normal whereby we get beyond discus-sions of energy independence and focus our efforts on dominating global energy markets. To fully realize this opportunity, the United States needs a comprehensive energy plan; something we haven't really ever had... I fully support our state's strong stance to make these energy policy changes a reality and allowing Texans to compete in a market free of government manipulation."

- Ryan Sitton -

Ekaterina Blinova
Ekaterina Blinova
Political Analyst

"The United States is currently losing a cutthroat global competition in the oil industry, due to the 1970s-era rules which ban American producers from exporting unrefined crude oil, qualified by experts as a crucial strategic error in the oil price war... American policy-makers are yet unwilling to support oil export liberali-zation, citing concerns about a probable hike in retail fuel prices in the US. Thus far, the question remains open whether the US oil industry will survive or not in the cutthroat competition, fighting with its hands tied behind its back."

- Ekaterina Blinova -

The Financial Times
The Financial Times

"The 1970s-era rules that ban exports of unrefined crude oil except in a few limited circum-stances are a relic of the OPEC oil embargo. They already served no useful purpose...Studies have confirmed that they do nothing to hold down fuel costs for US consumers, instead handing undeserved rents to refiners. Their continued existence undermines the international credibility of US support for free trade. Moreover, at a time of weak prices, they are particularly pernicious because of the threat they pose to US production... By con-tinuing to restrict exports, the US is therefore undermining its own production and helping competitors such as Russia and Saudi Arabia to increase their share of world markets. Regulations sometimes defended as a support for America's energy security will actually increase its net imports... Recent moves such as allowing increased exports of the ultralight oil known as condensate have been small steps in the right direction but not comprehen-sive enough to make a real difference. The best solution would be the complete abandonment of all oil export controls... In the global oil price war, the US is battling with one hand tied behind its back. It is time to abandon an outdated policy and make it a fair fight."

- The Financial Times -

Holman W. Jenkins, Jr.
Holman W. Jenkins, Jr.
Columnist, Editorial Writer, and member of The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board

"Oil is overflowing US storage facilities partly because of the 40-year-old export ban. Today's oil export ban was part of a spasm of nonsensical responses to the 1970s, all of them producing disasters on their own different schedules... The third stooge of 1970s energy policy, the ban on US oil exports, is now get-ting ready to produce its own unique pratfall. Thanks to the fracking boom in Texas and North Dakota, America is producing more light sweet crude than domestic refineries can handle. Oil producers were already being de-nied a premium of $12 a barrel by not being allowed to export this oil. Soon the only option may be to shut down production altogether... You may recall that Congress murmured a year ago about rolling back the export ban after analysts at Citigroup started warning of a looming storage crisis. Members quickly sank back to their knees under bludgeoning from shipping, labor and refinery interests."

- Holman W. Jenkins, Jr. -

George David Banks
George David Banks
Executive Vice President, American Council for Capital Formation (ACCF)

"Upon releasing their comprehensive energy policy package last month, House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., and Energy and Power Subcommittee Chairman Edward Whitfield, R-Ky., noted, 'Our energy realities have changed dramatically — we've gone from bust to boom practi-cally over-night. Today's energy policies are lagging far behind, and are better suited for the gas lines in the 1970s than this new era of abundance. We need policies that meet today's needs and are focused on the fu-ture...' I couldn't agree more with Upton and Whitfield. We are in the midst of an energy renaissance and it is well past time for our energy policies to catch up. However, while their agenda is a good first step, I would urge them to broaden it to include a specific look at lifting the ban on crude oil exports and expanding liquefied natural gas exports. Then our policies truly will be focused on the future... Not only will encouraging the export of our coun-try's abundant natural resources benefit Americans here at home, but it will also make the United States a global energy leader in energy diplomacy, one of the four policy areas stressed in the Energy and Commerce Commit-tee's legislative framework. The combination of increased domestic resources and an expanding global market presents our country with a historic opportunity. It will allow us to strengthen our economy and create jobs while increasing energy security for our allies abroad."

- George David Banks -

The Prince Arthur Herald
The Prince Arthur Herald
Editorial Board

"By lifting the oil export ban and approving Keystone XL, President Obama could score big strategically. By flooding the world with American supply even only marginally, OPEC might fall apart through exacerbated existing tensions. OPEC members are some of the biggest contributors to terrorist coffers. Oil rich Saudi Arabian sheiks shovel money to jihadists, while Iran shovels money at Hezbollah and Hamas. In the long run, lower oil prices might make the world a little safer by sapping terrorist financing. Another collateral benefit would be to weaken Vladimir Putin. By sending oil to Europe where prices are higher than in America, Obama could save Europeans from their dependency on Russian oil. Russia, already reeling from European and Ameri-can sanctions, might be forced to reform under increased competition for its oil exports ... Obama should re-verse his oscillations and swiftly help to undercut OPEC's hold on the global oil industry."

- The Prince Arthur Herald -

Houston Chronicle
Houston Chronicle
Editorial Board

"More than 100 members of the Texas House have signed on to a proposed resolution that calls the 1970s-era ban on oil exports 'a relic from an era of scarcity and flawed price control policies'... There's little reason why Texas wildcatters shouldn't be allowed to sell their products on the open market like anyone else. Instead we're stuck with a policy that leads to a perversion of the market, where Texas oil is less expensive than global prices. This hurts folks coming and going: Producers have to sell their wares for less and drivers have to pay more at the pump. After, all gasoline and other refined products are traded on an international mar-ket, while crude oil remains trapped behind an export ban."

- Houston Chronicle -

David Mica
David Mica
Executive Director, Florida Petroleum Council

"The United States is now a world leader in oil and natural gas production. So why are we still operating under a crude export ban dating from the '70s?... Clearly, the crude export ban is obsolete, and keeping it in place is costing us dearly... Why would we limit our economic potential by keeping one of our most valuable commodities off the global market? Every billion dollars in goods that we export supports about 5,000 U.S. jobs. It's time to eliminate the outdated crude export ban."

- David Mica -

John Kingston
John Kingston
President, McGraw Hill Financial Global Institute

"Ultimately, a free market finds the best locations for any commodity to be consumed. So if a ban is lifted and US crude doesn't go anywhere, that's probably a signal from the market that the rest of the world is better off consuming non-US crudes. But the fact that the crude can be exported will help make a more competitive market. It's always out there as, at least, a potential source of supply."

- John Kingston -

Harold York
Harold York
Principal Analyst for Oils Research, Wood Mackenzie

"[Exploration and production companies] would really like to capture that Brent price. The policy keeps them from getting that $10 today that they could get If export were allowed to flow freely out of the US ... Especially if you're a producer down on the coast. Somebody who can easily reach ports where they can export the crude."

- Harold York -

Louis Finkel
Louis Finkel
Executive Vice President for Government Affairs, American Petroleum Institute (API)

"To continue growing as an energy superpower, America must have policies that reflect modern energy markets, rather than policies based on a market that existed in the 1970s. Study after study shows that free trade in crude oil will mean more jobs, downward pressure on fuel costs, and could reduce the power that foreign suppliers have over our allies overseas... Our competitors overseas are working hard to lock-in their economic advantages as exporters, and we must act now to ensure US producers can compete effectively for a share of the global market. It's the smart thing to do for US consumers, for US workers, and for the energy security of America and its allies."

- Louis Finkel -

Houston Chronicle
Houston Chronicle

"The United States and the European Union have been debating whether they should provide arms for Ukraine, but the best weapons for fighting Vladimir Putin's attempts to undermine a strong Europe are oil and gas... This is the game that the United States can win if we choose to play. Exporting oil and gas poses one of the best opportunities to strengthen our allies in NATO and the European Union. The former Soviet Union provides more than 40% of Europe's oil. Russia has nearly exclusive control over natural gas supplies to the Baltic nations, which the United States has a duty to protect under the NATO charter. This level of control leaves our allies vulnerable to price shocks and supply cuts at the whim of an expansionist oligarch. Yet US crude is still restricted by a 1970s-era export ban and the federal government drags its feet on approving liquified natural gas exports."

- Houston Chronicle -

Tom Petrie
Tom Petrie
Chairman, Petrie Partners

"Oil exports in the US make sense... We're going to reach the limits of WTI processing capacity in this country very shortly, maybe this year. We need to have the flexibility to export higher value WTI and import the oils that are most suited to our refining system."

- Tom Petrie -

Sen. Connie Triplett
Sen. Connie Triplett
D-ND

"It just seems the time for that kind of restriction has passed and Congress should look forward."

- Sen. Connie Triplett -

David Floyd
David Floyd
Business Development Associate, Kapitall

"The law stands, but a growing chorus is calling for it to be lifted. The logic is worth considering. First, as The Economist reports, the US already exports a number of hydrocarbons, including liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), natural gas liquids (NGL) and liquefied natural gas (LNG). The US is the world's largest exporter of diesel, kerosene and gasoline: as refined products, these are legal to export, but the definition of "refined" is so broad that stabilized crude—the kind that's safe to transport via pipeline—counts... Second, the ban has hampered the efficiency of the US economy... Some suspect that shadowy industry interests are at work: companies want to export crude oil in order to pad thinning margins, and American consumers will suffer at the pump. The first argument is undoubtedly true. But lifting the export ban might actually lower gasoline prices."

- David Floyd -

Derek B. Miller
Derek B. Miller
President and Chief Executive Officer, World Trade Center Utah

"The strict controls over the export of crude oil is reminiscent of the Smoot Hawley Tariff and other isolationist, depression-inducing policies of the early 1900s. Our country rightly holds in high esteem the simple economic principle that free trade helps both consumers who want the best product at the lowest price and businesses that benefit from maximizing competitive advantages and exporting their goods and services overseas. But interestingly the federal government does not apply this principle of free trade to oil... The better approach for the US consumer who wants to be able to cheer at the gas pump AND see continued growth in the domestic oil and gas industry is to allow these oil producers to do what Americans do best, compete successfully abroad. This means getting rid of the old law and looking forward to legislation that will put the economy, and consequently Utah companies, as the first priority."

- Derek B. Miller -

Carlos Pascual
Carlos Pascual
Fellow, Center on Global Energy Policy

"[The ban is hurting Washington's credibility on the international stage, particularly on related issues such as free trade, sanctions on Iran, and even climate change]... The basic point is to say to countries that we have to [work] together to put global interests and concerns above short-term domestic action... The only way to maintain credibility is if you do it yourself."

- Carlos Pascual -

Scott Nyquist
Scott Nyquist
Director, McKinsey & Company

"The original oil-export ban was introduced in an era of scarcity, production declines, and price controls. When those conditions no longer exist, the rationale for continuing this policy begins to look as dated as those lava lamps."

- Scott Nyquist -

Mike Terry
Mike Terry
President, Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association

"One of OPEC's key allies has been our own federal government. Antiquated federal policy instituted in 1975 during a time of energy scarcity bans the export of American crude, even though products from US refiners are shipped worldwide. That ban prevents American oil producers from entering the same markets OPEC can, giving the cartel a decided advantage when selling its oil... Ending the country's ban on crude oil exports would help put an end to OPEC dominance and benefit American producers and Oklahoma consumers alike."

- Mike Terry -

Rep. Kevin Cramer
Rep. Kevin Cramer
R-ND

"Today, US oil production is higher than any other country's in the world, the trade deficit trend is turning around, technology has reinvented the oil and gas industry and we're less dependent on OPEC nations. We should finish what Reagan started 34 years ago and repeal the ban on exporting crude oil."

- Rep. Kevin Cramer -

Rep. Ted Poe
Rep. Ted Poe
R-TX

"We export cars, we export everything. But we don't export energy. Why? Because the law prohibits it. So the law needs to be changed."

- Rep. Ted Poe -

F. Gregory Gause
F. Gregory Gause
Head of International Affairs Department and Professor, The Bush School of Government & Public Service, Texas A&M University

"With prices low now, the leverage of oil exporters like Russia and the OPEC countries is down... Having American oil potentially on the world market - even potentially, doesn't have to be a lot of American oil on the market - makes it less likely that these oil producers can regain leverage... The argument is that we as a country are committed to free trade... Why should our trading partners be denied access to a tradable good like oil, when we do not want them to deny us their tradables and we want our other products to be able to enter their markets?"

- F. Gregory Gause -

Lori Taylor
Lori Taylor
Associate Professor and Director of the Robert A. Mosbacher Institute for Trade, Economics and Public Policy, The Bush School of Government & Public Service, Texas A&M University

"The price of oil is set in a world market - the price of gas, less so, but still heavily influenced by global economic conditions... And so the United States essentially imposing a ban on exporting US product harms the United States without any real impact on the rest of the world."

- Lori Taylor -

Carlton Carroll
Carlton Carroll
Spokesman, American Petroleum Institute (API)

"Study after study shows that free trade in crude oil will mean more jobs and downward pressure on fuel costs, and could reduce the power that foreign suppliers have over our allies overseas. It's time for policymakers to harness the economic advantages of free trade by lifting outdated and counterproductive limits on U.S. crude exports."

- Carlton Carroll -

Sarah Palin
Sarah Palin
Former Governor of Alaska

"If the administration sincerely wanted to help our domestic energy sector, it would lift the four-decade-old ban on exporting crude oil. American producers shouldn't have to beg permission of our own government to export our resources while the White House negotiates increased oil exports from Iran."

- Sarah Palin -

Helen Currie
Helen Currie
Senior Economist, ConocoPhillips

"Allowing the US to trade more crude, I would argue, strengthens our geopolitical position and helps us to be a better ally to many of our counterparts overseas, whether they are oil consumers or oil producers... The US economy would be better off if exports are allowed."

- Helen Currie -

Sourabh Gupta
Sourabh Gupta
Senior Research Associate, Samuels International Associates, Inc.

"Crude oil and natural gas are no longer in short supply and their export overseas does not impair US national security. The ban on their export in fact stands today on questionable legal ground... Going forward, as the US gradually displaces Saudi Arabia and Russia later this decade to become the world's foremost oil producer, it stands to eminent reason that the four-decades-old crude export ban be lifted in stages too... Lifting the ban on the export of domestic crude will allow the North American shale oil revolution to continue apace, generating jobs, profits and tax revenues while enabling the US to remain in compliance with its international trade, as well as, global stakeholder obligations."

- Sourabh Gupta -

Ashok K. Roy
Ashok K. Roy
Vice President, Finance & Administration, and Chief Financial Officer, University of Alaska

"Crude oil and natural gas are no longer in short supply and their export overseas does not impair US national security. The ban on their export in fact stands today on questionable legal ground... Going forward, as the US gradually displaces Saudi Arabia and Russia later this decade to become the world's foremost oil producer, it stands to eminent reason that the four-decades-old crude export ban be lifted in stages too... Lifting the ban on the export of domestic crude will allow the North American shale oil revolution to continue apace, generating jobs, profits and tax revenues while enabling the US to remain in compliance with its international trade, as well as, global stakeholder obligations."

- Ashok K. Roy -

Peter E. Gruenstein
Peter E. Gruenstein
Attorney, Gruenstein & Hickey

"It may sound counterintuitive that allowing oil to leave the confines of the US would reduce gas prices within the US, but several recent studies conclude exactly that. That conclusion is based on the straightforward economic principle that when you eliminate an artificial barrier that creates a market inefficiency, lower prices result. In short, free trade is almost always good for consumers... And did I mention that lifting the oil export ban would result in new investment approaching $1 trillion over the next 15 years? That's trillion with a 't.' Almost as much as we spend on some of our wars. By comparison, and even under the most optimistic assumptions, the Keystone pipeline project is a mere cup in the oil export barrel."

- Peter E. Gruenstein -

Tessa Sandstorm
Tessa Sandstorm
Director of Communications, North Dakota Petroleum Council

"Many US refineries are built, or were converted decades ago, to process heavy, sulfurous crude oils that are imported from Canada, Mexico and the Middle East. The crude that comes from shale plays like the Bakken and Eagle Ford is light, sweet and very valuable. Despite this value, it is often marketed at a discount because we do not have the refineries here to process this new abundance of oil. For this reason, the US may never truly be energy "independent." ... But we can be independent from those aforementioned countries that would seek to do us harm. The good news is the refineries that are equipped to handle light, sweet crude are among our friends and allies in Europe. The bad news is our export ban prevents them from purchasing our oil, and instead forces them to get it from countries that would also seek to do them harm. Herein lies the first benefit of US oil exports-geopolitical influence. Our ability to compete with OPEC in this global market would take away the organization's ability to manipulate oil prices, which would lend greater stability to the commodity... There are other benefits-namely jobs, economic growth and lower energy prices-that would come from lifting the export ban ... That opportunity starts with lifting the export ban."

- Tessa Sandstorm -

Marita Noon
Marita Noon
Executive Director, Energy Makes America Great Inc. and Citizens' Alliance for Responsible Energy (CARE)

"While the oil-and-gas industry sheds jobs as a result of the low price of oil (somewhat a victim of its own success), Obama could announce some initiatives that could help stem the losses. I'd like President Obama to offer his support to Congress' plans to lift the four-decade-old oil export ban, which would provide additional customers for US oil and give our allies a friendly source to meet their needs. Likewise, he could call on the Department of Energy to expedite approval of applications for liquefied natural gas export terminals — something a new Senate bill proposes."

- Marita Noon -

Lee Lane
Lee Lane
Visiting Fellow, Hudson Institute; Outside Consultant, NERA Economic Consulting

"The uncertain and possibly unstable world oil price regime greatly amplifies the need to reduce wasteful regulatory burdens on the oil logistics system. When crude oil prices were high, US drillers could live with some wasteful laws and mandates, including some that applied to how and where they shipped oilfield inputs and outputs. Wasteful policies harmed them but would not put them out of business. That is changing... Unfortunately, Keystone is not alone as a source of waste in US crude oil logistics. The strict curbs on US crude oil exports are at least as bad. Since the end of oil price controls in 1981, this restriction has lacked even a pretense of a policy rationale; meanwhile, the onshore oil boom has greatly hiked the costs of the export ban... The present is a golden moment for ending the export ban."

- Lee Lane -

Thomas E. Donilon
Thomas E. Donilon
Vice Chair, O'Melveny & Myers; Senior Director, BlackRock Investment Institute; Distinguished Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations; Former National Security Advisor to President Barack Obama

"...lifting the ban in full is the correct policy decision for the following five reasons ... First, the rationale for the ban is no longer relevant ... Second, lifting the ban is consistent with the United States' long-standing advocacy for free trade and open markets ... Third, lifting the ban will enhance America's energy security ... Fourth, crude exports will provide diplomatic leverage and a tool to assist our allies and friends ... Fifth, the current low price environment does not resolve the issue. Lifting the ban will advance our economy, our energy future, and our foreign policy and national security goals. It is the next step in leveraging our energy posture to protect and to enhance U.S. leadership for years to come."

- Thomas E. Donilon -

Joel Moser
Joel Moser
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Aquamarine Investment Partners;

"The quest for both economic growth and energy independence are powerful forces that drive decision making by the US government to support both conventional and unconventional energy production... Eliminating the US oil export ban is long overdue, and it makes great sense."

- Joel Moser -

David J. Porter
David J. Porter
Commissioner, Railroad Commission of Texas

"Our country's energy abundance is a strong geopolitical tool, and it's time for the policymakers in Washington, DC, to demand that we use this opportunity to our strategic advantage when it comes to facing down oppressive and authoritarian regimes like Russia and Venezuela. By doing so, we provide our friends and allies around the world with an alternative source of oil while creating jobs and opportunity here at home... The United States is undeniably a global super power—except when it comes to energy. And it's not because we don't have the resources... To fully realize the benefits of this domestic energy renaissance, Washington must end this 1970s-era prohibition so that the US can finally cement its status as the global energy superpower we know it can be. After all, it's the hardworking men and women of this country who stand to benefit the most."

- David J. Porter -

Chris Tomlinson
Chris Tomlinson
Business Columnist, Houston Chronicle

"The US oil supply is at one of the highest levels ever; it's time to start selling it... The time has come to let the US oil companies and refiners compete on the open market without any more coddling from Congress. If we believe in free markets, then we should let this one open up."

- Chris Tomlinson -

Ron Ness
Ron Ness
President, North Dakota Petroleum Council

"Thanks to major advances in technology in the Bakken and shale plays across the nation, US oil production has surged to more than 10% of the world's total. We're less reliant on foreign energy than ever before, and production is still rising. As a result, we've become a net exporter of refined petroleum products for the first time in over 60 years. This great rise in production have lifted the US from an era of energy scarcity to an era of energy abundance. We have an opportunity to become an energy superpower. Instead, we find ourselves in a price war with countries we've allowed to monopolize the global markets. OPEC has clearly seen the potential and have chosen to price us out of business. Lifting the export ban would enhance our ability to compete with OPEC in the global market and take away their ability to manipulate oil prices... But, we're not just talking energy security. There are other benefits, too – namely jobs, economic growth and lower energy prices – that would come from lifting the export ban... It's clear that allowing domestic energy producers, like those here in the Bakken, to sell crude oil on the world market would greatly benefit our state and our nation. Let's tell Congress it's time to repeal the ban on crude oil exports."

- Ron Ness -

Raymond J. Keating
Raymond J. Keating
Chief Economist, Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council (SBE Council)

"Looking ahead, huge opportunities for US entrepreneurs, businesses and workers can be found in the international marketplace. That is, business and employment growth related to domestic energy production can be expanded further through natural gas (via liquefied natural gas, or LNG) exports, as well as crude oil exports, to meet growing global energy demands... If the president is serious about getting the US economy and job creation moving, and about the US being a true global energy leader, he can work with the new Congress to end the 1970s-era ban on crude oil exports, and to dramatically streamline the long, bureaucratic process of getting LNG export facilities approved. Such policy steps make economic sense, and would be good news for America's entrepreneurs and small businesses that work in, support and benefit from the domestic energy sector."

- Raymond J. Keating -

J. Michael Barrett
J. Michael Barrett
Principal, Diligent Innovations; Former Director of Strategy, White House Homeland Security Council

"Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the rest of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries have recently launched a price war with the specific purpose of forcing Americans back to a dangerous dependency on foreign energy, and they are being aided by an outdated US policy prohibiting the export of domestic crude oil... The best way for American legislators to combat OPEC's aggression is to lift this ban. Scrapping this outdated policy will secure American progress toward energy independence... The cartel believes that American energy firms will break under pressure... Congress can strengthen our domestic economy while countering these plans. It should lift the ban on crude oil exports – a relic of the 1973 oil embargo. Free of the ban, domestic firms could sell oil to the many overseas buyers eager to reduce their own energy dependence on unstable, autocratic regimes, thus reducing the power of OPEC to maintain a throttle on U.S. and global oil supplies."

- J. Michael Barrett -

Phil Kerpin
Phil Kerpin
Head, American Commitment

"... every single serious study has found ... allowing crude exports would lower prices at the pum... \The oil and gas sector has been the US economy's brightest bright spot in recent years, but the glut of crude oil is holding back an even bigger boom. We are leaving oil in the ground because of the export ban. It's a self-defeating and destructive policy that hurts America while benefiting rivals abroad."

- Phil Kerpin -

Stephen Blank
Stephen Blank
Senior Fellow for Russia, American Foreign Policy Council

"For years, Putin has used his nation's oil and gas resources as a club to bully his adversaries... But now a slump in global oil prices has brought Russia's economy to the brink of collapse. The ruble is having its worst year since 1998. The country's inflation rate is rising along with unemployment... Oil and gas constitute 68% of Russia's total exports and half its federal budget. By quickly expanding America's energy exports, federal officials can deliver another blow to Russian aggression and firmly tilt the balance of power away from the Kremlin ... If US producers were allowed to export excess energy to foreign markets, they'd undercut Russia's key source of leverage and strengthen America's ties to her allies. Most American oil would probably go to Asia. That would free up Middle Eastern producers to send more to Europe, offsetting the continent's dependence on Russian energy and deepening the economic impact of sanctions... With the United States well on its way to becoming a net energy exporter, the logic behind the crude export ban is clearly outdated."

- Stephen Blank -

The Republican Editorials
The Republican Editorials
masslive.com

"Do some of those who back continuation of a ban on the export of oil from the United States still have 8-track players in their cars? Do they still wear bell-bottoms? ... If so, there'd be a sort of logical consistency at work, as their views on oil exports are mired completely in 1970s-style thinking... An awful lot has changed since the disco days. Yet the export ban remains in place... The oil export ban is a 1970s anachronism that should have no more place in today's world than rotary phones."

- The Republican Editorials -

The Leaders Column
The Leaders Column
The Economist

"Most of the time, economic policymaking is about tinkering at the edges. Politicians argue furiously about modest changes to taxes or spending. Once in a while, however, momentous shifts are possible... Such a once-in-a-generation opportunity exists today... In the name of security of supply, governments should be encouraging the growth of seamless global energy markets. Scrapping unfair obstacles to energy investments is just as important as dispensing with subsidies. The more cross-border pipelines and power cables the better. America should approve Keystone XL and lift its export restrictions, while European politicians should make it much easier to exploit the oil and gas in the shale beneath their feet... So our message to politicians is a simple one. Seize the day."

- The Leaders Column -

Rebecca Quintanilla
Rebecca Quintanilla
Director, North American Business Development, Mercuria Energy Trading

"Now is the time for the US to allow crude oil exports to Mexico. We have the type of crude Mexico wants to import, and if they don't import it from the US they will import it from elsewhere. Certainly the United States would benefit from the flow of money back into our economy instead of allowing other countries to claim the profit... The president should take immediate action to allow U.S. crude oil exports to Mexico because it is consistent with our national interests, and it is the right thing to do."

- Rebecca Quintanilla -

Jazz Shaw
Jazz Shaw
Weekend Editor, Hot Air

"Lifting the ban is the right thing to do, but the usual rounds of panic politics combined with environmental alarmists who oppose anything to do with American energy independence are going to fight this and will probably succeed in stopping it... That's a pity, because the people they were elected to serve will be the ones who pay for their shortsighted position."

- Jazz Shaw -

James M. Griffin
James M. Griffin
Professor and Bob Bullock Chair in Public Policy and Finance, Texas A&M University

"[If Congress and President Barack Obama are committed to free trade, striking down the Energy Policy Conservation Act of 1975 should be] a no brainer... It's something that the new Congress and the president ought to be able to agree on... They both claim that they support free trade. Here's a really good example of a case where we're not promoting free trade like we claim."

- James M. Griffin -

Orange County Register
Orange County Register

"Some suggest that lifting the ban on US oil exports, as Rep. Barton proposes, would reduce the supply of oil on the domestic market and put upward pressure on pump prices... But the EIA released a study in October in which it concluded that US gasoline prices would be unaffected if US oil exports were allowed. That's because the price US motorist pay at the pump is determined not by US oil producers, but by the global market... We agree with the Texas lawmaker that the 40-year ban on US crude exports should be repealed. It would be at once good for the US economy and good for national security."

- Orange County Register -

Karen Kerrigan
Karen Kerrigan
President and Chief Executive Officer, Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council

"The Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council (SBE Council) is pleased to support H.R. 5814, a bill that lifts the 40-year ban on the export of crude oil from the United States... The US is in the midst of a historic energy revolution, and it is being led by small businesses and entrepreneurs. Where entrepreneurship overall remains flat in the US, it is booming in the energy sector. Lifting the 40-year ban on crude oil exports will sustain the energy sector's growth, and create additional jobs and business opportunities for workers and entrepreneurs."

- Karen Kerrigan -

Anna Mikulska
Anna Mikulska
Research Analyst, Center for Energy Studies, Baker Institute for Public Policy

"[Permitting crude export] is a viable option that could potentially mitigate the harmful effect of lower prices on the US producers in the long term, while having no real effect on US consumers, thus preserving the "price at the pump" benefits of lower oil prices... With the price of oil declining, removing the ban on exports could offer a healthier long term view to US oil producers and attract capital into the US upstream sector. Moreover, analysis has indicated that such a policy shift would have no impact on the price of gasoline... Allowing oil/condensate exports could not only ameliorate concerns to domestic producers, but could also help push the US economy towards a more energy secure future."

- Anna Mikulska -

Jeremy M. Martin
Jeremy M. Martin
Director, Energy Program, Institute of the Americas

"There are minor exceptions to the current ban on crude exports, but they only account for small amounts of oil. But against the backdrop of the US energy revolution and booming shale oil production, there is a strong impetus to lift the ban, particularly if the US wants to convince the world that it truly supports free trade in energy. Indeed, recent exports of condensates point to the reality that companies will find ways to move the US energy bonanza to markets outside the US... Those efforts should be allowed and supported, not made the exception to the international energy trade rule."

- Jeremy M. Martin -

Alexis Arthur
Alexis Arthur
Energy Policy Associate, Institute of the Americas

"There are minor exceptions to the current ban on crude exports, but they only account for small amounts of oil. But against the backdrop of the US energy revolution and booming shale oil production, there is a strong impetus to lift the ban, particularly if the US wants to convince the world that it truly supports free trade in energy. Indeed, recent exports of condensates point to the reality that companies will find ways to move the US energy bonanza to markets outside the US... Those efforts should be allowed and supported, not made the exception to the international energy trade rule."

- Alexis Arthur -

Alex Mills
Alex Mills
President, Texas Alliance of Energy Producers

"Oil production has grown more in the United States over the past five years than anywhere else in the world. With these changes has come a widening gap among the types of oil that US fields produce, the types that US refiners need, the products that US consumers want, and the infrastructure in place to transport the oil... Allowing companies to export US crude oil as the market dictates would help solve this mismatch... Removing all proscriptions on crude oil exports will strengthen the US economy and promote the efficient development of the country's energy sector... Today's export restrictions run the risk of dampening US crude oil production over time by forcing down prices at the wellhead in some parts of the country. It would also encourage investment in oil and gas production in the United States rather than abroad. In oil-producing regions, more workers would be hired for oil exploration and production, as well as for local service industries. Greater policy certainty regarding exports would also catalyze the expansion of US energy infrastructure... Allowing crude oil exports will increase US energy security and enhance US foreign policy. It would demonstrate Washington's commitment to free and fair trade, and bolster its negotiating position on other trade issues."

- Alex Mills -

The Boston Globe
The Boston Globe

"The current ban on exporting oil has done pretty much nothing to help everyday consumers, but it has enriched refineries. There is no longer a convincing justification for this outdated policy... The current policy takes from Big Oil and gives to refineries, but serves no public purpose."

- The Boston Globe -

Jared Meyer
Jared Meyer
Fellow, Economics21 at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research

"In 2014, the crude oil export ban finally received the negative attention it deserves. This antiquated law makes it is illegal to export U.S. crude oil without special permission from the Bureau of Industry and Security. With the exception of exports to Canada, permission is rarely granted. In a country that is in the midst of groundbreaking free trade negotiations and an energy renaissance, the existence of the protectionist crude oil export ban makes little sense—especially when it is perfectly legal to export refined oil."

- Jared Meyer -

Thomas Tunstall, PhD
Thomas Tunstall, PhD
Research Director, Institute for Economic Development, University of Texas San Antonio

"It doesn't seem to make sense that we can export refined products and we can export natural gas, but we can't export crude oil."

- Thomas Tunstall, PhD -

Bob Tippee
Bob Tippee
Editor, Oil & Gas Journal

"The Department of Commerce office that licenses oil exports proposed a clarification in a Dec. 30 [2014] move hailed in early press reports as an opening of gates to a flood of exports... That interpretation goes too far...The guidelines address one problem, confusion, without solving it while a larger problem, light-oil supply exceeding nearby need, remains in place... The simple solution? Make tricky distinctions irrelevant by allowing the export of all liquid hydrocarbons."

- Bob Tippee -

Lee Fuller
Lee Fuller
Vice President, Government Relations, Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA)

"The jobs from crude oil development benefit the country... Those could be at risk if you're not able to export crude oil, and that risk is probably more visible with the drop in prices than it was six months ago."

- Lee Fuller -

Paul Ausick
Paul Ausick
Senior Editor, 24/7 Wall St.

"Without actually saying the words, the US Department of Commerce on Tuesday [Dec. 30, 2014] made clear that the US ban on crude oil exports has been lifted. The Commerce Department's Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) said that it has approved requests by some companies to export lightly refined condensates and it has outlined how it will treat further requests for permission to export oil... This is not exactly news... The news is that the agency has spelled out for the first time (in an FAQ of all places) what the rules are... Why now after months of dithering around? Could it be that the Obama administration has figured out that exporting near-crude is more likely to keep crude oil costs low than it is to raise them? If US crude from shale plays in North Dakota can get into the international market, and the Bakken producers can keep their costs under control, the United States may be able to take a bit of market share away from the Saudis."

- Paul Ausick -

Richard L. Burleson
Richard L. Burleson
Managing Partner, Burleson LLP

"As 2014 drew to a close, and concerns continued to swirl about the ongoing effects of falling crude prices, there was a bright spot last week for the energy industry – coming, of all places, out of Washington... On Dec. 30, the US Commerce Department published guidelines that clearly defined condensate not as a crude oil but as a petroleum product, which "are subject to few export restrictions." ...It's hard to predict whether this is a barometer of things to come or a stand-alone policy decision. About the only thing consistent about this administration's energy policy has been its inconsistency. But it could reflect a sense in Washington that lifting the export ban in entirety is a smart move that respects current global market realities... The energy industry has played a major role in the US recovery over the past few years, and those contributions could to some degree be threatened by the uncertain price climate. Government needs to do what is necessary to help keep this engine of economic opportunity running. Lifting the ban on condensates is certainly a step in that direction. Now it's time to do the same for all crude exports."

- Richard L. Burleson -

L. Todd Wood
L. Todd Wood
Contributor, Moscow Times, Fox Business, and NewsmaxTV

"With the price of crude collapsing in a confluence of weak demand and oversupply, the Obama administration should be giving American industry every advantage to gain market share and prevent giving the oil cartel, OPEC, another advantage over the United States. Ending the oil export ban seems like a no-brainer... Most likely, it will take a more "America first" administration to remove this archaic ban on energy exports. With the price of oil in the dumps, we should allow our own companies to do whatever is necessary to protect American energy security. What America doesn't need is the Saudis forcing a large percentage of our own producers out of the business due to low prices. This is a bridge too far for the Obama administration."

- L. Todd Wood -

Bill Richardson
Bill Richardson
Former U.S. Secretary of Energy, Clinton Administration

"[...The US oil and gas industry could benefit even more if it could supply foreign countries. But it can't do that until the US government completely lifts its oil export ban.] I do believe the Obama administration is going to move towards opening up those markets, and it's the right decision... That's our bread and butter. Stick to your bread and butter, but expand the base."

- Bill Richardson -

Oil & Gas Journal
Oil & Gas Journal

"The US should scrap its antique prohibition against the export of domestically produced crude oil. The sole argument for retaining the export ban is unsound. Perhaps unwittingly, it also conspires with anti-oil politics impeding another important element of North American petroleum logistics."

- Oil & Gas Journal -

Arthur Berman
Arthur Berman
Geological Consultant
* Represents a change in viewpoint from a previously published quote

"I do not support the ban on exporting crude oil but it is the law. Congress should debate the law and vote whether to keep or repeal the law. The Department of Commerce has given the oil companies a "wink" letting them know it would be OK to export their light oil if they just call it something else. Isn't it illegal to advise people how to get away with breaking the law? ... Obama clearly favors taking a regulatory approach to complex problems instead of the more cumbersome process of passing or repealing laws. It is wrong to offer oil companies a regulatory solution that borders on illegality when it would be right to debate the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and reach a clear course of action."

- Arthur Berman -

Marianne Kah
Marianne Kah
Chief Economist, ConocoPhillips

"I would say the current circumstances increase the urgency of getting rid of this ban... The first group to benefit is really the American consumer."

- Marianne Kah -

Robert McNally
Robert McNally
Executive Director, National Association of Royalty Owners

"The reasons for the ban are no longer relevant, and by keeping it in place, we are actually making the US less competitive and energy supplies less secure – the opposite of its intended effect... Now, with the recent and rapid increase in domestic US oil and natural gas production, it is time for Congress to lift the ban on US crude oil exports... The choice America faces is simple: We can keep exporting more US dollars abroad to import more oil. Or we can lift the oil-export ban, and in the process benefit from the additional energy, jobs, tax revenue and economic growth that comes with it."

- Robert McNally -

Michael Hinton
Michael Hinton
Chief Customer Officer and Senior Vice President, Products and Solutions, Allegro Development Corporation

"With so much to gain, regulators and politicians are finding it harder to side with the status quo. Americans generally want more jobs, disposable income and economic growth, not to mention national security through reduced dependence on foreign oil. Relaxing - if not completely repealing - the crude export ban, could mean more for everyone, including oil companies who stand to make a handsome profit off a rapidly expanding global energy economy."

- Michael Hinton -

Keith Kohl
Keith Kohl
Managing Editor, Energy and Capital

"Some reports have estimated that if the oil export ban were lifted next year, the US would be able to export nearly 3 million barrels per day in 2015... Personally, I don't think it's a question of if but rather when the United States will lift its four-decade ban on crude oil exports... Once the ban is lifted, however – and US producers in the Lower 48 have access to global oil markets – the sky is the limit... Mark my words: 2015 will be the year US tight oil goes global."

- Keith Kohl -

Chris John
Chris John
President, Louisiana Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association

"The shale development boom across the United States is changing our country's energy landscape as US crude oil output soars to a 31-year high and oil imports continue to steadily decline. Lifting the 1970s era crude oil export ban would allow this boom to continue while lowering energy costs for consumers and increasing tax revenues for local governments. "

- Chris John -

B. Ashok
B. Ashok
Chairman, Indian Oil Corporation Ltd.

"We are indeed looking forward to US crude coming into the market."

- B. Ashok -

Chang Woo Seck
Chang Woo Seck
Head of Corporate Planning Office, SK Innovation

"[The lifting of the ban on US oil exports] will substantially reduce the cost of bringing crude [to South Korea]"

- Chang Woo Seck -

Stuart Elliott
Stuart Elliott
Associate Editorial Director, Platts

"If the ban on US crude exports were to be lifted, the global oil market would be transformed. The US would profit from less isolated production and the global oil market - currently vulnerable to the volatile situations developing in the Middle East - would benefit from stability and predictability."

- Stuart Elliott -

Sen. John Hoeven
Sen. John Hoeven
R-ND
* Represents a change in viewpoint from a previously published quote

"[While the drop in prices] will slow [production] down in some areas [the main, larger projects] should be fine... [The pressure on oil prices makes] it even more important that we pass the kind of legislation that helps our energy industry compete in the global economy... [The price tumble] does help [strengthen the arguments in favor of lifting the crude oil export ban] because of this imbalance between light and heavy [crude] and it is about making our domestic industry more competitive."

- Sen. John Hoeven -

John R. Auers, P.E.
John R. Auers, P.E.
Executive Vice President, Turner, Mason & Company

"If production continues to grow and you still limit the ability to export crude, you will get to a day of reckoning when you can't consume the crude."

- John R. Auers, P.E. -

Mark W. Hendrickson
Mark W. Hendrickson
Economist and Fellow for Economic and Social Policy, The Center for Vision & Values, Grove City College

"The 1970s-era federal restrictions on oil exports may soon come back to bite us... Oil markets are global; so the more crude that hits the global market, the lower the price of crude oil (hence, the prices of gasoline, kerosene, diesel, heating oil, etc.) will fall. The last time I checked, cheaper prices for needed products help working families."

- Mark W. Hendrickson -

Fadel Gheit
Fadel Gheit
Managing Director and Senior Analyst, Oil and Gas sector, Oppenheimer

"We have had a ban on oil export for 40 years. By just saying we will lift the ban I guarantee you that oil prices will come down, it will hurt Putin, it will help the global economy and it will definitely put Russia in a very weak spot."

- Fadel Gheit -

Mark J. Perry, Scholar
Mark J. Perry, Scholar
American Enterprise Institute; Professor of Economics and Finance, University of Michigan

"In 2012, US oil production grew by 1 million barrels a day - faster than in any other country in the world... This surge in energy production has created hundreds of thousands of jobs, pumped tens of billions of dollars into the economy and given new life to American manufacturing, which is supplying the steel, cement, equipment and machinery to drill thousands of new oil and gas wells each year... We're quickly running out of refining capacity to handle new shale oil production. If we don't lift our ban on oil exports - a relic of the Arab oil embargo and Iranian Revolution in the 1970s - we run the risk of capping production and impeding our own economic growth."

- Mark J. Perry, Scholar -

Patrick Hedger
Patrick Hedger
Policy Director, American Encore

"Federal law makes it illegal for American companies to sell all that crude oil overseas, even to our allies. How does that make any sense?... The honest answer is that it doesn't... In the 21st Century, Americans are still suffering under the misguided energy policies of the 1970s for no discernible reason. It's time that we embrace America's ability to dominate the global oil market and let the American people benefit from it next time they go fill up."

- Patrick Hedger -

Vikram Rao
Vikram Rao
Executive Director, Research Triangle Energy Consortium (RTEC)

"The oil export ban is an anachronism and needs to be lifted. The original energy security beliefs no longer hold water. We are fast approaching the point at which domestic production augmented with that of the near neighbors Canada and Mexico will serve the bulk of our oil needs ... Exporting oil is good for the economy and a potentially important political gesture at a time when European allies are needed to combat the latest threat in the Middle East."

- Vikram Rao -

Sen. John Barrasso
Sen. John Barrasso
R-WY; Chairman, Senate Republican Party Policy Committee

"I think lifting this ban will help create a better market for oil from Wyoming and North Dakota... I think it will create jobs and help local economies."

- Sen. John Barrasso -

Erika Johnsen
Erika Johnsen
Former Associate Editor, Hot Air

"It will take an act of Congress to move the outward flow of unrefined oil products anywhere beyond a very small trickle, but I'm glad to see the Obama administration actually follow through somewhat on its stated promise to free up US exports – and one which, however infinitesimally at this stage, could boost our wealth- and job-creating capabilities... While opponents of lifting the crude oil export ban often argue that doing so will push the prices that US consumers pay at the pump higher, the reality is that releasing more supply into the global market could actually exert downward pressure on those prices... If this condensate export approval can lead by example on that front, then all the better for the entire crude-oil export debate."

- Erika Johnsen -

Julia Bell
Julia Bell
Manager of Industry & Public Affairs, The Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA)

"The time has come to expand oil exports... This is an oil era of abundance and opportunity. That's why it's time to revisit and repeal the crude export ban... Allowing for a freer oil market will boost American job creation, grow our economy, and secure our energy future."

- Julia Bell -

Chris Faulkner
Chris Faulkner
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Breitling Energy

"American energy producers are eager to sell to foreign markets. Federal regulators should let them. The crude oil ban is a damaging law from a bygone era. It's stifling industry expansion. Doing away with the ban will lead to more jobs, investment and growth here at home."

- Chris Faulkner -

William D. Nordhaus
William D. Nordhaus
Sterling Professor of Economics, Yale University

"You have a really valuable resource sitting there, whether it's in Texas or North Dakota or wherever... It's something that people will pay a lot of money for, but there's no way to get it out [and into the global marketplace.]"

- William D. Nordhaus -

Marlo Lewis, Jr.
Marlo Lewis, Jr.
Senior Fellow, Center for Energy and Environment, Competitive Enterprise Institute

"Nix the Export Ban... Defenders of the status quo claim that repealing the ban will increase US gasoline prices. In the very short run: maybe or maybe not. The more lasting effect, though, will be to increase investment in exploration and production. That will contribute to global crude oil supply, putting downward pressure on global crude oil prices - the principal factor determining gasoline prices."

- Marlo Lewis, Jr. -

Phil Flynn
Phil Flynn
Senior Energy Analyst, The PRICE Futures Group

"It is time to lift the oil export ban. The boom in US oil production has to change the mindset about our energy policy to better reflect the realities of today instead of the fears of the past... This is a new era in the US of oil production, one of abundance and security, not one of desperation and fear."

- Phil Flynn -

K. Earl Reynolds
K. Earl Reynolds
President and Chief Operating Officer, Chaparral Energy

"We think the business case for allowing exports is very compelling... We want to be able to sell our crude oil in more than one market, the same way producers of coal or other commodities can now ... I think with more crude on the market, gasoline prices would go down."

- K. Earl Reynolds -

Mat-Su (AK) Valley Frontiersman
Mat-Su (AK) Valley Frontiersman

"The analysis by energy consultant IHS makes the case that the ban is a remnant of a bygone global oil market that bears little resemblance to the market of today. The United States, once a weakened oil producer, now finds itself - rather abruptly - as a rejuvenated supplier of oil... By ending the export ban, Congress and the president could achieve a few things noted in the IHS report: Increase oil production further; drive down gasoline prices by 8 to 12 cents per gallon; create anywhere from about 400,000 to 860,000 jobs; increase government revenue by up to $2.8 trillion; and increase annual gross domestic product by up to $170 billion ... So let's get on with it."

- Mat-Su (AK) Valley Frontiersman -

Reid Porter
Reid Porter
Spokesman, American Petroleum Institute (API)

"Supporting the free market and supporting open trade is a key priority for our industry... It creates efficiencies, creates jobs and increases revenue to our government."

- Reid Porter -

Robert Bradley, Jr.
Robert Bradley, Jr.
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Institute for Energy Research

"A triple-win awaits repeal of the 39-year-old federal ban on U.S. crude oil exports. Consumers would receive lower gasoline and diesel prices from global refining efficiencies. Domestic producers would receive (higher) world prices from new markets and in turn, increase production. The broader economy would benefit from increased activity all around... Today, the oil-export ban is a policy without a purpose - and distortive of natural market incentives at home and abroad... It is time for the visible hand of markets to replace the dead hand of a regulatory past. The US and world oil markets have changed, and US-side public policies must too."

- Robert Bradley, Jr. -

William O'Grady
William O'Grady
Executive Vice President and Chief Market Strategist, Confluence Investment Management

"It actually gives us a bit more geopolitical clout by being able to export... If we want this industry to continue to expand, lifting this export ban is one of the things we're going to have to do to make sure that expansion takes place."

- William O'Grady -

Jason Bordoff
Jason Bordoff
Professor, Professional Practice in International and Public Affairs, Columbia University; Director, Center on Global Energy Policy

"The oil export ban was put in place to address scarcity concerns and keep US producers from bypassing price controls by selling oil for a higher price abroad. Now, with US output soaring and price controls jettisoned decades ago, it is time to lift that restriction... The current statutory restrictions on oil exports are a legacy of a bygone era that doesn't reflect today's energy reality. On economic, security and geopolitical grounds, they should be lifted."

- Jason Bordoff -

Jack Rafuse
Jack Rafuse
Principal, Rafuse Organization

"OPEC and Russia benefit most by our non-export policies, and have for years. Russia uses its oil and natural gas resource and its monopoly on natural gas exports to Central Europe, to exercise political power over trading partners. And Russia has opposed US exports of LNG and crude - saying that export will harm the US environment. How nice of them to worry about us... As to our trading partners, our massive new resources are already working to reduce overseas LNG prices, and are starting to do the same with oil prices... The pros of lifting the crude oil (and the LNG) export bans far outweigh the cons, which are due either to a misguided desire to end all fossil fuel now, or a worry that any change leads to bad things."

- Jack Rafuse -

William O'Keefe
William O'Keefe
Chief Executive Officer, Marshall Institute

"The ban on exporting crude oil without a license was a knee-jerk reaction to the first oil embargo in 1973. It made no economic or energy policy sense then and makes even less today... A failure to lift the export ban will eventually lead to less investment in domestic production and infrastructure improvements, because prices will be artificially suppressed and production companies will be able to get higher returns elsewhere... For the most part, those who oppose allowing crude exports are those who benefit economically from artificially depressed prices. What they gain economically is offset by the economic losses from lost investment opportunities."

- William O'Keefe -

Jason Stverak
Jason Stverak
President, Franklin Center for Government & Public Integrity

"America's place in the global energy market is radically different than it was 40 years ago, but Congress is still adhering to some of the protectionist policies put in place during the 1970s oil crisis. With America now a leader in energy production, it's time to open up the world markets to American crude and take advantage of our economic and geopolitical position of strength."

- Jason Stverak -

Andrew Wheeler
Andrew Wheeler
Principal, Energy and Environment Practice Group, FaegreBD Consulting

"Just a few short years ago, no one would have guessed that the United States would be in a position to consider lifting its restrictions on exports of crude oil, but the US suddenly finds itself once again as an energy superpower... Our access to new reserves is also decreasing our dependence on foreign oil and making energy prices - and American consumers - less vulnerable to the whims of geopolitics... We can bury our heads in the sand and base decisions on 1970s technologies and geopolitics, or we can wake up and deal with the issue in today's world of increased US production and reserves and new technologies."

- Andrew Wheeler -

Michael E. Canes, PhD
Michael E. Canes, PhD
President, United States Association for Energy Economics (USAEE)

"We can think of this as a tax on US imports. By restricting crude oil exports, particularly those of light sweet crude oils which are in surplus in the US, we tax ourselves in the form of higher prices for imported goods. Domestic oil producers earn (and produce) less while consumers of imported goods pay more. Doesn't sound like a very good deal to me. Time to reexamine the policy and loosen US crude oil export restraints forthwith."

- Michael E. Canes, PhD -

Denise Bode
Denise Bode
Principal, Cornerstone Government Affairs

"Lift the ban on American oil exports and give America global market power, real leverage. By allowing exports even as it continues importing oil, the U.S. can exercise maximum flexibility in world oil markets. It can keep U.S. oil flowing, encouraging further exploration and drilling. And it can help maintain relatively stable gasoline prices, because these are largely determined by world markets."

- Denise Bode -

Mackubin Owens
Mackubin Owens
Editor, Orbis

"With the United States poised to become the largest producer of oil in the world, global oil prices have begun to fall, much to the dismay of Russia, Iran and Saudi Arabia... The time has come to leverage this development by repealing the outdated laws dating from the Arab oil embargo of the 1970s... Sound economic analysis suggest that lifting the ban on exporting crude oil would actually help to lower the domestic price of refined products by creating a more efficient system for distributing and refining oil... Lifting the ban on US crude oil exports will also intensify the change in the geopolitical landscape created by fracking and horizontal drilling by making it more difficult, if not impossible, for one country to manipulate regional energy supplies, as Russia has been doing in Eastern and Central Europe."

- Mackubin Owens -

Nathan Randazzo
Nathan Randazzo
Columnist, Oil & Gas IQ

"It is still too soon to tell what will be the full effects the falling oil and gas prices will have on the US shale revolution and economy, but perhaps now is the time to finally reverse the crude oil export ban to allow the US to compete on the global market... This could potentially offset geopolitical efforts that are threatening America's economic bright spot and generate more stable crude oil prices that benefit both US consumers and producers."

- Nathan Randazzo -

Edward Cross
Edward Cross
President, Kansas Independent Oil and Gas Association (KIOGA)

"For the first time in generations, surging domestic oil and natural gas production is driving our energy security and providing a crucial buffer against disruptions in Europe, Africa and the Middle East... We also must work quickly to solidify our role as an energy superpower by modernizing trade restrictions that prevent US oil from reaching global markets."

- Edward Cross -

The (Oklahoma City, OK) Oklahoman
The (Oklahoma City, OK) Oklahoman

"Domestic supplies are now abundant. The export ban is beyond obsolete. It's time to open the spigots."

- The (Oklahoma City, OK) Oklahoman -

Peter Bruce
Peter Bruce
Editor-in-Chief, BDFM

"America now offers us another opportunity to act for our future. Not only is it recovering economically, but it is (or soon will be) the biggest oil producer in the world. Thanks to shale gas and oil and advances in fracking technology, it is entirely independent of fuel imports. Even more interesting is that US law forbids the export of oil. That will change, and when it does, the US economy will be immensely strong."

- Peter Bruce -

Thomas J. Donohue
Thomas J. Donohue
President and Chief Executive Officer, US Chamber of Commerce

"I want to lift the ban. I just want to get it done in a reasonable sequence... It is going to happen."

- Thomas J. Donohue -

John Aziz
John Aziz
Associate Editor, Pieria

"This archaic, dysfunctional law is just hurting the economy without really providing any national security benefit... Time to say goodbye to it."

- John Aziz -

Steven Rattner
Steven Rattner
Chairman, Willet Advisors LLC

"America's renewed hydrocarbon boom could be even more robust if we eased outdated restrictions on shipping both crude oil and liquefied natural gas overseas... If the export ban were lifted completely, the price of crude oil in the United States would rise to the global price (adjusted for transportation costs and differences in quality), but the price of gasoline at the pump wouldn't change... Yes, the higher price of crude oil would mean more profits for producers; more important, it would encourage drilling. That means more production, more jobs, and less reliance on imports and an improvement in our trade balance."

- Steven Rattner -

Ken Cohen
Ken Cohen
Vice President, Public and Government Affairs, Exxon Mobil Corporation

"We are not dealing with an era of scarcity, we are dealing with a situation of abundance... We need to rethink the regulatory scheme and the statutory scheme on the books."

- Ken Cohen -

Ryan Olson
Ryan Olson
Research Associate, Center for Trade and Economics (CTE), The Heritage Foundation

"Limiting exports of crude oil discourages energy exploration in the United States... Export limitations also discourage production because they cause a domestic surplus... The US government has long been reluctant to export its energy resources - from its historic bans on crude oil to recent foot dragging on natural gas. Yet exports have long been touted as a way to grow our economy out of the current recession. What better way to do this than by allowing one of our most promising industries to take advantage of billions of global energy consumers?"

- Ryan Olson -

FTI Consulting and Sidley Austin LLP
FTI Consulting and Sidley Austin LLP

"What is needed to combat opponents and to change the narrative is an explanation of why oil exports are good for the United States and its citizens. This means explaining - at both the national and local levels - the benefits of free trade, the positive impacts on jobs and economic growth, the contributions to government revenues (and) the geopolitical influence that would accrue to the US by exporting oil ... Perhaps most important, it must be stressed that, when it comes to exports, oil is just like any other important commodity - whether it be cars, corn, or chemicals."

- FTI Consulting and Sidley Austin LLP -

Kristin Thomas
Kristin Thomas
Vice President - Public Relations, Continental Resources

"We are attempting to get light, sweet to the refineries that are configured for it... Our belief is that the market for light, sweet crude extends beyond the borders of the US, and as such, there is a need for lifting the ban."

- Kristin Thomas -

Tim Guinness
Tim Guinness
Chief Investment Officer and Fund Manager; Will Riley

"The Ukraine-Russia crisis, as well as Russia's position as a major energy provider, has renewed the discussion on whether the US should export crude oil. A forty-year-old decree bans US producers from exporting crude oil, and it needs to be repealed. It represents misguided protectionism and is a hangover from the days before the US embraced free trade. We think that exporting crude oil would be an economic benefit to the US, as it incentivises the full development of the US shale resource."

- Tim Guinness -

Editorial Board, The Washington Post
Editorial Board, The Washington Post

"If anything, the United States' continuing export restrictions diminish the country's credibility when it asks other nations to adopt rational policies that rankle economic nationalists. Congress should let the country participate fully in the international oil market."

- Editorial Board, The Washington Post -

Benjamin Brown
Benjamin Brown
Communications Coordinator, Capital City Republicans

"Perhaps because the export ban was passed in a spirit of promoting national security, many in Washington avoid the issue of its repeal, in spite of the fact that it makes perfect sense. While the export ban tends to depress prices for sellers, it can also deny access to these goods for those who most need to buy them. Russian dictator Vladimir Putin's ability to bully the European Union due to the strength of his hydrocarbon export position is part of what made possible the Crimean annexation and the shadowy Ukraine invasions; Europe suffers as American oil is kept artificially off of the market. Lifting the export ban not only means more jobs for Americans and revenue for Alaska, but also will undercut other nations' misguided hegemonic policies."

- Benjamin Brown -

Zachary Cikanek
Zachary Cikanek
Spokesperson, American Petroleum Institute

"Policymakers can help keep America's energy momentum strong by turning aside unnecessary regulations and opening access to federal lands and foreign markets... Duplicative regulations and 70s-era trade restrictions limit our growth as an energy superpower, and that's exactly what our competitors want."

- Zachary Cikanek -

Rob Port
Rob Port
Editor, SayAnythingBlog.com

"One problem with America's domestic oil and gas markets is that the refiners basically have a captive audience. With few exceptions, American oil and gas producers cannot ship their unrefined product abroad for sale. It must be sold to refiners here in the US before export. That's a tremendous boon for the refineries, but it severely restricts that market American oil and gas producers can access... So open it up. Allow the export of unrefined oil and gas to meet international demand. An expanded market would, again, help put American oil and gas producers on an even footing with OPEC."

- Rob Port -

Rep. Gene Green
Rep. Gene Green
D-TX
* Represents a change in viewpoint from a previously published quote

"The LNG should go first because of the amount, and it's an environmental issue, in South Texas we're still flaring production and natural gas... That will show the success, and on a reasonable basis we can even export crude oil."

- Rep. Gene Green -

John S. Watson
John S. Watson
Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Chevron Corporation

"[The company is a] strong supporter [of allowing exports of both crude and natural gas] ... The U.S. is a free trade nation, and we shouldn't be seen as hoarding resources."

- John S. Watson -

Scott. D. Sheffield
Scott. D. Sheffield
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Pioneer Natural Resources

"Continuing to ban crude oil exports will not reduce either global demand or production of crude oil ... Eliminating the ban, however, will help ensure that more global production will occur in the U.S., fully subject to U.S. safety and environmental regulations."

- Scott. D. Sheffield -

Michael Hsueh
Michael Hsueh
Strategist, Deutsche Bank

"We would not expect that a lifting of the ban tomorrow would immediately trigger a large volume of oil exports ... The most important benefit of a relaxation of export restrictions would not be to release pent-up export supply, but rather ease the introduction of future domestic supply growth."

- Michael Hsueh -

Rhonda I. Zygocki
Rhonda I. Zygocki
Executive Vice President, Policy and Planning, Chevron Corporation

"We fully support the elimination of the ban on crude exports. We believe the long-term interests of the U.S. are best served by exports. The very parameters that led to the export ban are being challenged."

- Rhonda I. Zygocki -

Mark Green
Mark Green
Editor, API–Energy Tomorrow

"It's our choice. By choosing American energy - increasing domestic oil and natural gas production by opening access to new reserves and allowing exports to friendly buyers overseas - the United States can affect world energy supplies in positive ways - providing domestic benefits, helping allies and countering the energy leverage of others abroad."

- Mark Green -

Mark Maddox
Mark Maddox
Contributor, The Hill; former acting Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy

"One matter I would put at the top of the "must do" list is a review of the administration's current policy regarding oil exports... Obstructing oil exports has put the United States at the mercy of its global competitors, allowing them to dictate our energy security and undermine our oil production while they protect their market share and engage in predatory pricing."

- Mark Maddox -

Mark P. Mills
Mark P. Mills
Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute; Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Digital Power Capital

"The time has come to revoke the 40-year-old law's ban on oil exports. Such action would open up world markets to all of the small, mid-sized, and large American oil companies (not merely the occasional few that win Washington's regulatory lottery), unleashing yet more production, generating billions of dollars of tax revenues, creating millions more jobs, and reshaping global geopolitics."

- Mark P. Mills -

Arjun Sreekumar
Arjun Sreekumar
Contributor, The Motley Fool

"Overall, the IHS study – and several other studies like it – suggests that lifting the 40-year ban on crude exports would be a net positive for the U.S. economy. Benefits including higher domestic oil production, reduced petroleum imports, job growth, lower domestic gasoline prices, and higher government revenues should easily offset the negative impact on U.S. refiners. Personally, I think a piecemeal lifting of the export ban would probably be in the nation's best interest."

- Arjun Sreekumar -

Nicolas Loris
Nicolas Loris
Economist, Herbert and Joyce Morgan Fellow, Thomas A. Roe Institute for Economic Policy Studies, The Heritage Foundation

"While the U.S. will likely remain an important supplier of crude oil long into the future, the long-standing statutory ban on exporting crude oil, in combination with production outpacing refineries' ability to process the crude, will limit America's economic potential and cause a decline of otherwise viable drilling... Expanding market opportunities will not just benefit oil companies. By opening the door to establish more efficient global oil markets, all Americans will reap the benefits of lower prices and a stronger economy."

- Nicolas Loris -

Jeffrey Kupfer
Jeffrey Kupfer
Bernard Schwartz Fellow, Asia Society Policy Institute

"A ban that may have made sense in the time of cassette tapes and rotary phones is now clearly outdated and counterproductive. Forty years is long enough. It is time to show the world that America is ready to do business."

- Jeffrey Kupfer -

Samuel A. Van Vactor, Ph.D.
Samuel A. Van Vactor, Ph.D.
President, Economic Insight, Inc.

"Given the massive costs and paltry benefits of the oil export ban, Congress should immediately act to free the Alaskan oil trade and repeal the prohibition on oil exports."

- Samuel A. Van Vactor, Ph.D. -

Donald A. Norman, Ph.D.
Donald A. Norman, Ph.D.
Director of Economic Studies, MAPI

"It makes sense to export lighter oil to markets where it is more highly valued because it can command a premium price... This will provide additional incentive for U.S. producers to develop domestic resources."

- Donald A. Norman, Ph.D. -

Michael D. Plante
Michael D. Plante
Senior Research Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas

"If the export ban were not in place, large and persistent discounts would not occur because surplus oil would flow away from the Gulf to destinations where it would fetch a higher price and U.S. crude prices would eventually rise to global levels... Landowners who collect royalty payments and governments that tax oil production would benefit from higher crude prices... U.S. consumers also stand to gain from lower retail fuel prices... With greater amounts of oil available globally, more gasoline and diesel would be produced, reducing their prices and benefiting U.S. consumers."

- Michael D. Plante -

Robert J. Samuelson
Robert J. Samuelson
Columnist, The Washington Post

"By all logic, we should be working to sustain the [oil] boom. We aren't, and therein lies a classic example of how good policy is held hostage to bad politics and public relations. What would promote continued exploration is a lifting of the current U.S. ban on exporting crude oil. Let producers sell into the world market... Benefits are huge. Surging U.S. production has created thousands of jobs, helped stabilize global oil markets and curbed our import dependence. From 2008 to 2014, net imports dropped about 50 percent."

- Robert J. Samuelson -

Bud Weinstein
Bud Weinstein
Associate Director, Maguire Energy Institute

"The current ban on exporting American oil is nonsensical... America is an energy-rich country, the richest in the world. We need to stop acting as though we're energy poor."

- Bud Weinstein -

Shelley Goldberg
Shelley Goldberg
Commodity Strategist, Wall St. Daily

"In 2013, the United States produced more oil than it imported for the first time since 1988 - and cut its dependence on foreign oil in half from 2005 levels... By 2015, the United States is expected to overtake Russia and Saudi Arabia as the world's biggest producer, according to the IEA... Yet one thing standing in the way of full energy independence is the government's long-standing restriction on oil exports."

- Shelley Goldberg -

Neal Asbury
Neal Asbury
Chief Executive, The Legacy Companies; Host, "Neal Asbury's 'Made In America'"

"But like a bad hangover, one of the lasting results of the 1973 oil embargo is that in 1975 the government halted all U.S. exports of oil. It might have made sense then, but not now... If nothing else, just revisit the old axiom of supply and demand. The world needs more oil. The United States can greatly increase its production. The United States can have a big impact on world pricing of petroleum products. U.S. citizens would benefit with more jobs and lower energy prices. Hard to see the downside."

- Neal Asbury -

Chicago Tribune Editorial Board
Chicago Tribune Editorial Board

"Like free trade in general, selling American oil overseas would be good for our economy. It would make the oil market more efficient, encourage a build-out of the U.S. energy network and stabilize prices over time for consumers... Lifting the export ban also would demonstrate Washington's commitment to free and fair commerce as trade negotiations get rolling with Europe and Asia... Congress should have lifted the ban years ago... Today, however, the government has no reason to keep holding back one of the nation's most promising industries."

- Chicago Tribune Editorial Board -

George Baker
George Baker
Executive Director, Producers for American Crude Oil Exports (PACE)

"Today's report is further evidence that the ban on US crude oil exports is outdated and should be lifted, because doing so will provide enormous benefits to American consumers and workers."

- George Baker -

Neil Hume
Neil Hume
Commodities Editor, Financial Times

"[Lifting the crude export ban would be a] more straightforward way of ensuring the benefits of the shale revolution."

- Neil Hume -

Michael L. Krancer
Michael L. Krancer
Partner, Chair–Energy Industry Team, Blank Rome LLP; former Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP)

"We'd love to export [more energy] ... I think we have enough for the entire world."

- Michael L. Krancer -

Ben Shepperd
Ben Shepperd
President, Permian Basin Petroleum Association

"Lifting the crude oil export ban, which is an issue very important to us producers in West Texas, I think that issue has a lot of potential."

- Ben Shepperd -

Michael James Barton
Michael James Barton
Policy Fellow, ARTIS; Co-Founder, Security Solutions Global

"Though a ceasefire appears to be holding in Ukraine, it's clear much more needs to be done if the international community hopes to permanently stop Russian aggression... There is something the United States can do that will be both effective and not risk a wider war: lift the economic blockade imposed against American exports of crude oil and liquid natural gas to Europe. European countries, including Russia's closest neighbors, depend heavily on Russia for their energy needs, and Russia uses this dependency as strategic leverage."

- Michael James Barton -

Tim Worstall
Tim Worstall
Contributor, Forbes; Senior Fellow, Adam Smith Institute

"It's just so much simpler and cheaper to allow crude oil exports. So, the ban should go."

- Tim Worstall -

Paul Driessen
Paul Driessen
Senior Policy Advisor, Committee for a Constructive Tomorrow (CFACT); Senior Policy Advisor, Congress of Racial Equality

"If ever there was a time to end the ban on oil exports, it's now ... With US demand for oil products falling, production rising, and myriad studies making a strong case for selling American crude abroad, the president and Congress should terminate the ban as soon as possible."

- Paul Driessen -

Tina Barbee
Tina Barbee
Spokesperson, Tesoro

"Lifting the crude oil export ban in isolation effectively picks winners and losers in the marketplace ... [However, Tesoro supports the concept of] free trade and free markets."

- Tina Barbee -

Jim Lee
Jim Lee
Regents Professor of Economics, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

"If that... ban is lifted, then US oil and gasoline prices will rise modestly as oil producers will be able to ship the excess supplies to countries at higher prices... With the number of LNG and gas condensate export plants being proposed in the port district, South Texas stands to benefit the most from this policy change."

- Jim Lee -

Maria van der Hoeven
Maria van der Hoeven
Executive Director, International Energy Agency

"Some may see this as a choice between keeping American oil within US borders for reasons of economic security and allowing the US to generate billions of dollars in new export revenues. But market realities suggest a far simpler decision ahead: either US crude is shopped abroad or it stays in the ground."

- Maria van der Hoeven -

Gen. Martin Dempsey
Gen. Martin Dempsey
United States Army, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

"An energy independent and net exporter of energy as a nation has the potential to change the security environment and the world, notably in Europe and in the Middle East."

- Gen. Martin Dempsey -

Seth Kleinman
Seth Kleinman
Head of Energy Strategy–Global Commodities Research, Citigroup

"If lower gasoline prices for the US consumer are a desired aim, the US should be exporting crude, and lowering Brent and hence global gasoline prices in the process."

- Seth Kleinman -

Edward Morse
Edward Morse
Managing Director, Global Head of Commodity Research, Citigroup

"It is incontrovertible that if the US exported crude the price of gasoline would be lower."

- Edward Morse -

Rusty Braziel
Rusty Braziel
President, Principal Energy Markets Consultant, RBN Energy

"The rules that were established to be able to handle the exports of those hydrocarbons were all established back in the shortage days. In the olden days, these laws and rules didn't make any difference, Now in a world of exports, they do."

- Rusty Braziel -

Resources for The Future
Resources for The Future

"Our basic finding is that the efficiency of global refinery operations would be improved a little if the ban on US exports of crude oil were to be lifted. And, accordingly, gasoline production would go up and its price in the US would fall, anywhere from 3 - 7 cents per gallon once the economy could adjust to lifting the ban. This range could be a bit broader depending on assumed price elasticities of supply and demand and other factors."

- Resources for The Future -

William F. Shughart II
William F. Shughart II
Research Director/Senior Fellow, The Independent Institute; J. Fish Smith Professor in Public Choice, Utah State University

"Not only will lifting the ban bring substantial economic benefits to the country, but doing so will also advance US and global energy security. The times – and the world – have changed in the decades since the ban was put into place and our energy policies need to catch up."

- William F. Shughart II -

Phillips 66
Phillips 66

"[Crude exports would be] good for our country."

- Phillips 66 -

Mark A. Barteau
Mark A. Barteau
Director, Energy Institute; DTE Energy Professor of Advanced Energy Research; Professor, Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan

"In respect to export restrictions, it does not make a lot of sense to distinguish crude from refined products, from liquefied natural gas, or from natural gas liquids ... With increasing domestic production and decreasing imports, the incentive to do so for political appearance should also diminish."

- Mark A. Barteau -

Stephen V. Gold
Stephen V. Gold
President and Chief Executive Officer, MAPI

"To create new growth opportunities for manufacturers, when the 114th Congress reports for duty in January 2015, it should make lifting the crude oil export ban a priority."

- Stephen V. Gold -

Merrill Matthews, PhD
Merrill Matthews, PhD
Resident Scholar, Institute for Policy Innovation; Vice Chairman, Texas Advisory Committee of the US Commission on Civil Rights

"What's in the best interest of the US is a healthy energy sector and efficient markets, where the price is a reflection of undistorted supply and demand... For 40 years, the US economy and foreign policy have been constrained by politically repressive, oil-producing countries. That day could be coming to an end if we have the ability to export oil."

- Merrill Matthews, PhD -

Mickey Thompson
Mickey Thompson
Owner and President, Brain Storm Strategies, LLC; Paragon Energy Partners, LLC

"I think the best argument for lifting the crude oil export ban is that it's blatantly unfair to domestic oil producers... We've been exporting gasoline and diesel for 25 to 30 years... The point is that the markets should be open. If I want to sell my oil – although I doubt anyone wants to buy my five barrels a day in Great Britain or France – why shouldn't I have the right to do that?"

- Mickey Thompson -

Rep. Jim Bridenstine
Rep. Jim Bridenstine
R-OK

"The United States is poised to develop and export energy to the advantage of the American economy and permanently reduce Russia's control over European energy markets... Control a nation's energy and you control the nation. The biggest hurdle to the American energy renaissance - and European energy security - is not Moscow, but Washington D.C."

- Rep. Jim Bridenstine -

Rep. Bill Flores
Rep. Bill Flores
R-TX

"We just need to get through the economic benefits for the American soccer mom about how she is better off, and her family's better off, by having crude oil exports... That's just going to take a little time ... It's going to take a full discussion to make sure everybody knows the economics and they know whose ox gets gored in this ... And really, if we do it right, nobody's ox gets gored."

- Rep. Bill Flores -

C. Dean McGrath, Jr.
C. Dean McGrath, Jr.
Attorney-at-Law, Gross & Welch; Adjunct Professor of Law, Georgetown University

"With Russia now a growing threat to the United States and her allies, we need to consider all of our options. That includes addressing Russia's energy threat. Doing away with our needless export bans and restrictions would certainly help."

- C. Dean McGrath, Jr. -

Toby Mack
Toby Mack
President and Chief Executive Officer, Energy Equipment and Infrastructure Alliance (EEIA)

"America, along with its oil and gas producers, energy supply chain companies, and millions of American workers, are quite literally "missing the boat" as a result of the federal government-imposed ban on crude oil exports, and severe limits on liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports. Eliminating these restrictions would set the stage for dramatically more rapid growth in energy production and for the supply chain businesses that support energy operations."

- Toby Mack -

Rep. John Shimkus
Rep. John Shimkus
R-IL

"[I am open to lifting the ban] and treating American crude oil like other domestically-produced commodities."

- Rep. John Shimkus -

Sen. Mark Begich
Sen. Mark Begich
D-AK

"This could help stimulate America's oil industry and create American jobs here at home."

- Sen. Mark Begich -

Darren Beaudo
Darren Beaudo
Director, External Communications and Media Relations, ConocoPhillips

"The ability to export crude oil from the United States is vital to the country's economic growth and national security, job creation, and strengthening our competitive position in the global marketplace."

- Darren Beaudo -

Charles T. Drevna
Charles T. Drevna
President, American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers

"We're free-marketers... We've historically been that. Right now, we've reaffirmed that. I'm sure we'll be addressing it again going forward."

- Charles T. Drevna -

Charles K. Ebinger
Charles K. Ebinger
Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy, Energy Security Initiative, Brookings Institution

"What's at stake is that with the unconventional oil production that we have in areas such as North Dakota and elsewhere in the country, as well as large volumes of crude coming in from Canada, we will soon face a fact that we have a surplus on the U.S. Gulf Coast. Which will lead to falling petroleum prices, which on the one hand may sound good for American consumers, but if prices fell to the level that threaten this new unconventional oil and gas production, we could see large investment shut-in and that would be very deleterious to our long-term energy security."

- Charles K. Ebinger -

Gov. Chris Christie
Gov. Chris Christie
R-NJ

"The long-term benefits of open markets for U.S. energy exports are also worth considering in light of the response, particularly in Europe, to Russian aggression in the Ukraine... [North America should] open the global market for United States crude [to reach its full] energy potential."

- Gov. Chris Christie -

James L. Williams
James L. Williams
Economist, WTRG Economics

"The EIA is saying that exporting oil won't hurt the consumer... It would benefit the oil industry, which means more jobs."

- James L. Williams -

Erik Milito
Erik Milito
Director of Upstream and Industry Operations, American Petroleum Institute

"By growing exports, we can create more U.S. jobs, promote greater U.S. energy production, and put downward pressure on fuel costs - a conclusion the Government Accountability Office (GAO) emphasized in a report last week... It's time for policymakers to harness the economic advantages of free trade by lifting outdated and counterproductive limits on U.S. crude exports."

- Erik Milito -

Andy Karsner
Andy Karsner
Chief Executive Officer, Manifest Energy LLC; former Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Bush Administration (2006-2008)

"It's as if we own the world's biggest bank vault but misplaced the key... Let's lift that export ban and have America shaping the market price in our own interest."

- Andy Karsner -

James Fallon
James Fallon
Consultant, Purvin & Gertz, Inc.; former Director, IHS Downstream Energy Consulting

"There are different types of oil and they require different kinds of refining processes and facilities... And as a result of the boom in tight oil production, the U.S. is exceeding its capacity to process that type of crude. Current export restrictions mean that light crude has to be sold at a sharp discount to compensate for the extra cost of refining it in facilities that were not designed for it. That gridlock is preventing additional investment and production–and the additional economic benefits–that could otherwise take place."

- James Fallon -

Kurt Barrow
Kurt Barrow
Managing Director, Downstream Energy group, IHS Consulting

"If crude oil export restrictions were lifted, the resulting increase in oil production would increase supply and actually lower gasoline prices... The gasoline trade and price fundamentals are clear."

- Kurt Barrow -

Sen. Rand Paul
Sen. Rand Paul
R-KY

"I would immediately get every obstacle out of the way for our export of oil and gas... And I would begin drilling in every possible, conceivable place within our territories in order to have production that we can supply Europe with if it's interrupted from Ukraine."

- Sen. Rand Paul -

Rep. Mike Conaway
Rep. Mike Conaway
R-TX

"The crude oil export ban is a relic of a 1970s energy policy designed to prevent price-controlled US crude from flowing overseas to higher paying customers... As a conservative, I am a strong supporter of open, competitive markets... Allowing free trade in crude oil will drive domestic investment in jobs and energy infrastructure."

- Rep. Mike Conaway -

Jonathan Glionna
Jonathan Glionna
Chief U.S. Equity Strategist, Barclays

"The export ban is considered antiquated given the U.S. shale revolution and reduced reliance on foreign oil, and a review is likely to be on the political agenda."

- Jonathan Glionna -

Patrick Pouyanné
Patrick Pouyanné
Chief Executive Officer and President of the Executive Committee, Total S.A.

"We need to fight and put this topic on the table... I hope the European Commission raises this issue, the refiners in Europe and Asia are suffering from one rule. That is the US cannot export oil."

- Patrick Pouyanné -

Sen. Marco Rubio
Sen. Marco Rubio
R-FL

"We must eliminate the barriers that prevent us from exporting natural gas and oil abroad, such as the outdated ban on crude oil exports that dates back to the 1970s."

- Sen. Marco Rubio -

Sen. John Cornyn
Sen. John Cornyn
R-TX, Senate Minority Whip

"On balance, it strikes me as a pretty good idea [as long as refineries are prepared for the transition]."

- Sen. John Cornyn -

Jack N. Gerard
Jack N. Gerard
President and Chief Executive Officer, American Petroleum Institute

"We should not be bound by past practices... It's a new day, it's a new time, it's a new America as it relates to oil and natural gas... We should look at it from a free-trade point of view [and] not limit opportunity for growth here in this country."

- Jack N. Gerard -

John C. Felmy
John C. Felmy
Chief Economist, American Petroleum Institute

"Allowing free trade in energy will mean more jobs, downward pressure on fuel costs, and can further reduce the impact of global unrest on oil markets. U.S. energy production is already having a major impact on world markets, and if policymakers embrace free trade, that influence will continue to grow in a way that benefits our economy."

- John C. Felmy -

Margo Thorning
Margo Thorning
Senior Vice President and Chief Economist, American Council for Capital Formation

"EPCA's crude oil export ban is a classic example of a cure being worse than the disease. Allowing crude oil exports now before the day of reckoning will strengthen the U.S. economy and provide gains to consumers and the overall economy."

- Margo Thorning -

Blake Clayton
Blake Clayton
Adjunct Fellow on Energy, Council on Foreign Relations; Senior Associate, Citi

"Without compelling reasons for continuing to restrict crude exports, and given the potential benefits, Congress should liberalize the crude oil export regime... Though the companies that benefit from today's export restrictions might oppose any change in the status quo, the broader gains available to the United States from allowing crude exports make it the far better choice."

- Blake Clayton -

Robert P. Murphy
Robert P. Murphy
Senior Economist, Institute For Energy Research

"Free trade and free markets enhance freedom of choice for all Americans, and the benefits flow accordingly. If the government places arbitrary restrictions on the flow of resources, that makes Americans poorer on net. Ironically, the very people supposedly helped by the export ban–American motorists–are among those hurt by it."

- Robert P. Murphy -

David Williams
David Williams
President, Taxpayers Protection Alliance

"There simply are no good reasons in this day and age to maintain the last century's policy of banning crude oil exports. For reasons of economic development, job growth and energy security, the United States should move to lift the crude oil export ban as quickly as possible."

- David Williams -

Sen. Lisa Murkowski
Sen. Lisa Murkowski
R-AK, Ranking Republican member, Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

"Together, we can send a strong signal to the world that the United States is ready to lead on energy, the environment, and trade. Lifting the ban will help create jobs, boost the economy, and keep our production at record levels."

- Sen. Lisa Murkowski -

Karen Alderman Harbert
Karen Alderman Harbert
President and CEO, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Institute for 21st Century Energy

"We should have a free energy market out there which would benefit our industry, provide more markets for our industry and make sure we are able to reap the value of all our resources."

- Karen Alderman Harbert -

Rep. Joe Barton
Rep. Joe Barton
R-TX

"I'm in favor of overturning the ban on crude oil exports ... the shale revolution has changed the energy landscape in our country. It is time to change our laws to match this new reality."

- Rep. Joe Barton -

Harold Hamm
Harold Hamm
Chief Executive Officer, Continental Resources, Inc.

"[Lifting key parts of the export ban] would add domestic jobs and strengthen oil security abroad. U.S. crude exports could help counter aggression by Russian President Vladimir Putin."

- Harold Hamm -

Sen. Mary Landrieu
Sen. Mary Landrieu
D-LA

"We had to reserve the oil that we had, when no one else was shipping to us ... now that we have more open trade opportunities, and we are producing more here, it just makes absolute perfect sense to reconsider this policy and update it according to the times."

- Sen. Mary Landrieu -

Daniel Yergin
Daniel Yergin
Vice Chairman, IHS.

"The 1970s-era policy restricting crude oil exports -- a vestige from a price controls system that ended in 1981 -- is a remnant from another time."

- Daniel Yergin -

Rep. Randy Weber
Rep. Randy Weber
R-TX

"Let's use all we can and sell the rest. I am a free market kind of guy. A rising tide raises all ships."

- Rep. Randy Weber -

Rep. Michael McCaul
Rep. Michael McCaul
R-TX

"The decades old ban on crude oil exports is no longer justified given the current market conditions. Lifting the ban will also give America a new foreign policy tool to provide greater stability in the world oil market."

- Rep. Michael McCaul -

Rep. Blake Farenthold
Rep. Blake Farenthold
R-TX

"Do you vote for what is good for your district and your constituents or what is good for your country? I am going with the country on this."

- Rep. Blake Farenthold -

Sen. Ted Cruz
Sen. Ted Cruz
R-TX

"The American Energy Renaissance cannot thrive if the federal government ...impedes the jobs and economic growth hydraulic fracturing is already providing."

- Sen. Ted Cruz -

Ben van Beurden
Ben van Beurden
Chief Executive Officer, Royal Dutch Shell

"Policy makers here in the US should embrace a truly liberalized diverse and global energy market ... [US oil and natural gas exports] would reinforce the long term future of North American energy production ... and help to make the global energy system much more stable."

- Ben van Beurden -

Rex Tillerson
Rex Tillerson
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Exxon-Mobil

"In the current debates about LNG and crude oil exports, economists and leaders from across the political spectrum, from all sides, agree that free trade would lead to increased investment, more jobs and, importantly, increased production."

- Rex Tillerson -

Lawrence H. Summers
Lawrence H. Summers
Former Director of the White House National Economic Council and Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, Obama Administration.

"Permitting the exports of oil will actually reduce the price of gasoline."

- Lawrence H. Summers -

James Kim
James Kim
Research Fellow and Program Chair, American Politics and Policy program and the Center for Regional Studies at the Asan Institute for Policy Studies

"Depending on one source too much raises risks. If we have various sources to import crude including the United States, it will help reduce price fluctuations."

- James Kim -

Kyle Isakower
Kyle Isakower
Vice President - Regulatory and Economic Policy, American Petroleum Institute

"Now that the U.S. is poised to become the world's largest oil producer, the economic case for exports is clear ... harnessing these benefits, however, will require lawmakers and regulators to reexamine policies that were enacted long before the U.S. transitioned from a period of energy scarcity to our current position: one of energy abundance."

- Kyle Isakower -

Sen. John McCain
Sen. John McCain
R-AZ

"It is in America's national security interest to leverage our nation's energy boom to reduce the dependence of our allies on the natural resources of Vladimir Putin's Russia."

- Sen. John McCain -

Aaron Task
Aaron Task
Editor-in-Chief, Yahoo Finance

"I think it makes total sense for America to do this for economic and geopolitical reasons."

- Aaron Task -

David Nicklaus
David Nicklaus
Business Columnist, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"Disco music, wide lapels and other 1970s artifacts have been out of fashion for a long time. It's time for that era's energy policy to join them on the scrap heap of history."

- David Nicklaus -

Dr. Ernest Moniz
Dr. Ernest Moniz
United States Secretary of Energy

"[The ban needs to be revisited] in an energy world that looks nothing like the 1970s."

- Dr. Ernest Moniz -

Rep. Matt Salmon
Rep. Matt Salmon
R-AZ

"We are ok with lifting the ban."

- Rep. Matt Salmon -

Amy Jaffe
Amy Jaffe
Executive Director of Energy and Sustainability, Graduate School of Management, Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, CA

"What we're really discussing is who will get profits from [U.S.] exports. The best way to protect consumers is to have ample supply in regional markets, [strong ties with Canada and Mexico,] and have minimum inventory levels established, which are successful in Europe and Japan."

- Amy Jaffe -

John Kemp
John Kemp
Analyst, Reuters

"There is no rational basis for maintaining a near-total ban on exporting crude while allowing refined products to be exported freely."

- John Kemp -

Lee Warren
Lee Warren
Manager - Internal & External Communications, Marathon Oil Corporation

"[Allowing oil exports] will encourage further investments in oil and gas exploration and production, create more jobs, improve the balance of trade and create other economic benefits for our country."

- Lee Warren -

Ryan Lance
Ryan Lance
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, ConocoPhillips

"We've been out pretty publicly as a company supporting and advocating on behalf of not only the condensate exports, but the crude-oil exports as well. The condensate solves a very, very small problem."

- Ryan Lance -

David L. Goldwyn
David L. Goldwyn
President and founder, Goldwyn Global Strategies, LLC; former State Department Special Envoy and Coordinator for International Energy Affairs, Obama Administration

"The broadest bipartisan worry is that crude-oil exports will drive up domestic gasoline prices despite the fact that every rigorous economic analysis believes the opposite is true."

- David L. Goldwyn -

The Aspen Institute
The Aspen Institute

"Given the public's sensitivity to changes in the price of gasoline, many in Congress are reluctant to support eliminating the ban on crude oil exports ...the oil market, however, is worldwide and prices of various grades of oil are set in world markets."

- The Aspen Institute -

Keep the Ban!
Comments about leaving the ban in place.
The Columbian (Clark County, WA)
The Columbian (Clark County, WA)

"As the United States enjoys a boom in oil production, common sense dictates that the oil should remain at home, providing American refinery jobs and reducing the nation's reliance upon oil imports. Common sense also dictates that it is unconscionable that a Senate hearing featuring experts and legislators did not include a single mention of the environmental impact of exporting oil... Lifting a ban on exports would be a bad idea for the United States, both economically and environmentally. And with Vancouver in the midst of the oil debate, that means it would be a bad idea for us."

- The Columbian (Clark County, WA) -

Karthik Ganapathy
Karthik Ganapathy
USA Communications Manager, 350.org

"It feels ridiculous to have a discussion about lifting the ban on oil exports and not talk about climate change... What it boils down to is lifting the ban encourages and incentivizes oil production in the US, and that's the wrong direction."

- Karthik Ganapathy -

Brad Markell
Brad Markell
Executive Director—Industrial Union Council, AFL-CIO

"If we lift the ban on crude oil exports, we will export both our oil and the jobs and economic activity associated with refining that oil."

- Brad Markell -

Patti Goldman
Patti Goldman
Managing Attorney, Earthjustice

"Eroding the crude oil export ban in place for more than 40 years is incredibly controversial. At a time when the nation has made a commitment to reduce climate-warming emissions and the renewable energy sector is going gangbusters in job creation, US energy policy should reject any measure that encourages more drilling and more production of highly polluting crude oil. Decisions like this by the [Bureau of Industry and Security] need to be transparent and made with full public participation."

- Patti Goldman -

Yvonne Cather
Yvonne Cather
Chair, Sierra Club—Kansas Chapter

"We don't need to export our oil unless you have stock in companies that make a profit off of it. In fact, in a few years we really are going to need a lot less of this stuff for good. And that's a good thing."

- Yvonne Cather -

John T. Johnson III
John T. Johnson III
Board Member, Arlington Convention and Visitors Bureau Board of Directors

"Who is it that my state representative, Joe Barton, and his band of brothers is truly supporting? Their constituents or Big Oil? ... Nary a cent of my business income is derived from any facet of the oil and gas industry. Most Texas household incomes are not, nor are most in the US. We are all celebrating low prices at the pump... When I save $20+ per fill-up, I like it. It stays in my pocket. I spend it on other things that generate tax revenue for the state... Furthermore, this country is not energy independent. Why does Barton want to export crude oil when we are still importing? Make sense? Not to me."

- John T. Johnson III -

Sam Schabacker
Sam Schabacker
Mountain West Region Organizer, Food & Water Watch

"The impact of [allowing exports] will be pretty dire in a couple of ways. First and foremost, this would be a sweetheart giveaway to the oil and gas industry. A lot of people in the industry have been salivating over the prospect of getting to take the fracked oil that has been increasingly in abundance in the United States and ship it overseas to countries like China or India or continents like Europe. And we can be certain that if this bill goes forward to fast-track the export of oil, fracked oil, or even fracked natural gas, we're going to see thousands more fracking wells next to homes and schools, as we have seen in Texas, in New Mexico, in Pennsylvania, in my home state of Colorado ... The second concern is, of course, if you start exporting this resource overseas, there is a question of what that will do to the cost of getting that resource in the United States. For many consumers, folks that are working, that are just barely able to make ends meet, the prospect of seeing their home heating costs go up because of this export bill, that's not a satisfactory one, that's not one that they're looking and excited to have to add to the long list of costs that they're already trying to take and make ends meet with."

- Sam Schabacker -

Rex J. Zedalis
Rex J. Zedalis
Professor of Law, The University of Tulsa

"There can be no doubt that the current nearly 50% discount in crude oil prices over this past summer affects the oil industry and its suppliers. It also affects the stores and employees where industry income is spent, as well as the state governments in "oil country" that would otherwise benefit from the additional tax revenue... While this is far from helpful to efforts to jump-start the nation's economy and rapidly move away from the depths of the financial crisis and its ensuing recession, there are several reasons why it would be a mistake to believe lifting the current embargo on oil exports would cure the price problems bedeviling the oil industry... Perhaps one can disagree over whether the long-standing US restrictions on exports of domestic crude should be lifted. From the standpoint of seeking "true" (rather than mere rhetorical) energy independence, however, the course is crystal clear. What's certain regarding export restrictions is that any suggestion they should be lifted because such will boost the price of oil is unlikely to be received favorably by consumers."

- Rex J. Zedalis -

Sandy Dechert
Sandy Dechert
Contributor, Clean Technica

"We extract enough shale gas that we can now afford to export it. This harms other nations in terms of postponing development of cleaner renewable energies and promoting instant gratification and chauvinist greed. Eventually, too, through the atmosphere, surface air, water, and soil, the poisons will come back to us... Not only does the United States ignore domestic and world priorities by using and exporting fracked resources, but we set a horrible example. Shooting for energy independence, we hypocritically turn our backs on sustainability, develop toxic and increasingly costly extraction and production methods that developing nations can exploit at speed, if they choose to, and invest in frail partnerships like the joint ventures in the arctic that have become lost assets because someone crossed a line in the Ukraine... Some estimators of projected US shale reserves – including independent analyst, author, and investor Bill Powers – see them declining much, much faster than the US Energy Information Administration estimates. Others see them peaking by the end of the decade, perhaps sooner... So what happens then? So much for energy independence. Better to spend our limited cash on something that's going to last."

- Sandy Dechert -

John Podesta
John Podesta
Counselor to the President, Climate Change and Energy Policy, Obama Administration

"At this stage, I think that what the Commerce Department did in December [allowing the export of condensate] sort of resolves the debate. We felt comfortable with where they went ... If you look at what's going on in the market and actions that the Department took, I think that ... there's not a lot of pressure to do more."

- John Podesta -

Jay Hauck
Jay Hauck
Executive Director, Consumers and Refiners United for Domestic Energy (CRUDE)

"Put simply, a change in policy would mean the added value comes from abroad, not from here at home. To add injury to insult: American crude would be shipped over to Europe, refined there, and then those products would be sold back to us at a higher price than if the crude oil were refined in the United States... Meanwhile, shipping domestically-produced crude oil overseas would mean less domestic crude oil is being refined here in the United States, while we are still importing about 45% of our daily demand! Prices here would inevitably rise, in effect creating a massive tax increase - perpetrated by Congress."

- Jay Hauck -

Arthur Berman
Arthur Berman
Geological Consultant

"Whatever outcome results from the debate over petroleum exports, it will result in higher prices for American consumers. There are experts who argue that it won't increase prices much and that the economic benefits will outweigh higher costs. That may be but I doubt that anyone knows for sure. Everyone agrees that oil and gas will cost more if we allow exports."

- Arthur Berman -

Stephen Kretzmann
Stephen Kretzmann
Executive Director and Founder, Oil Change International

"Removing the crude export ban would be a disaster for the climate... President Obama and the US Congress need to stand up to Big Oil and defend the current regulations if he is actually serious about addressing our climate crisis... Big Oil's push for deregulation is all about profits and nothing more, no matter the consequences for our climate and communities... To push for more oil drilling at a time when our communities are facing climate chaos everyday is to deny the reality of climate change."

- Stephen Kretzmann -

Jonathan Chanis
Jonathan Chanis
Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University

"If you give domestic sellers the option of selling crude oil internationally, they would have more buyers and the realized price should go up... However, there could be negative implications for California. The export ban often slightly lowers the price of crude in California because Alaskan production is essentially captive to that market."

- Jonathan Chanis -

Michael A. Levi
Michael A. Levi
Director, Maurice R. Greenberg Center for Geoeconomic Studies

"It runs against the conventional wisdom about what oil security means... Something seems upside-down when we say energy security means producing oil and sending it somewhere else."

- Michael A. Levi -

Carl Pope
Carl Pope
Former Executive Director, Sierra Club

"We shouldn't allow the export of US crude oil - unless we also want to guarantee the continuation of sky high OPEC prices."

- Carl Pope -

Brendan E. Williams
Brendan E. Williams
Senior Vice President of Advocacy, American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM)

"While some argue we may need to immediately advance a policy of unrestricted exports due to an over saturation of domestic, light crude oil... we are far from the point of such saturation. Utilization increases, crude mix adjustments, import exchanges and refining investments will allow at least a million barrels more light crude oil to be manufactured into finished products domestically in the short term. We have plenty of time to discuss and better understand the implications of crude oil exports, as well as to address other regulations imposing barriers to free trade."

- Brendan E. Williams -

Leo W. Gerard
Leo W. Gerard
International President, United Steelworkers

"Lifting the ban would benefit oil companies that engage in oil exploration and production, but it would harm their refining operations that have to purchase crude at the market price... It also would hurt independent refiners that do not engage in oil exploration."

- Leo W. Gerard -

Gary Beevers
Gary Beevers
International Vice President, United Steelworkers

"Lifting the crude oil export ban would harm U.S. refineries and workers... Oil companies that engage in exploration and production would reap huge profits at the expense of their refining units that have to buy oil on the open market. Also harmed would be independent refiners that do not engage in oil exploration... The reasons for not ending the crude oil export ban are obvious... Congress and the administration should not even be considering incremental legislation that would lift the ban in stages."

- Gary Beevers -

Thomas O'Malley
Thomas O'Malley
Executive Chairman, PBF Energy

"Lifting the oil export ban will raise prices for US refiners... The math is simple on this action: Removing export ban = higher oil prices = higher gasoline prices = angry voters."

- Thomas O'Malley -

Jeremy Nichols
Jeremy Nichols
Climate and Energy Program Director, WildEarth Guardians

"I think the last thing we need to be talking about is exporting fossil fuels... We're struggling to try to rein in carbon pollution as a nation... The American people want to see action and are concerned about the costs in increased pollution or a failure to reduce carbon pollution effectively. If we're talking about exporting oil, we're just talking about burning it somewhere else."

- Jeremy Nichols -

Philip Rinaldi
Philip Rinaldi
Chief Executive Officer/Principal Partner, Philadelphia Energy Solutions LLC

"[Loosening exports is] a very bad idea... I would prefer to be adding value and selling to others, rather than behaving as if we were a colony to the rest of the world and selling them the raw materials so that they could add value and sell us back expensive products."

- Philip Rinaldi -

Michael C. Jennings
Michael C. Jennings
President and Chief Executive Officer, HollyFrontier Corp.

"Crude exports on the part of a country that imports nearly half of its crude oil requirements are, in our view, very unlikely to improve energy security or advance national interest, as we will simply make ourselves more dependent upon crude oil imports as we export our own crude."

- Michael C. Jennings -

Rep. Kevin McCarthy
Rep. Kevin McCarthy
R-CA, House Majority Leader

"[Mr. McCarthy isn't ready to support lifting or relaxing the nation's decades-old ban on oil exports, although he fully endorses exporting natural gas.] "We actually get a little premium where our oil is cheaper simply from the fact of what we're getting. If we didn't, it would find its natural price and it would actually rise a little ... I do believe in the free market."

- Rep. Kevin McCarthy -

Rep. Ed Whitfield
Rep. Ed Whitfield
R-KY

"I've been reading a number of articles recently from some quite knowledgeable people who are of the opinion that the shale oil discovery may not be quite the bonanza that we expect it to be ... And so because of the direct link between oil and gasoline prices – and that's always a hot political topic here in the US – anything about oil exports is going to be a little bit more dicey an issue ... [his subcommittee plans to hold a number of hearings on the topic next year to] get more of the facts."

- Rep. Ed Whitfield -

Sen. Ron Wyden
Sen. Ron Wyden
D-OR, Senate Energy Committee Chair

"There may be a time when crude oil exports are appropriate, but is now that time? ... The US is still importing about half our oil, including from some places that don't always have America's best interest in mind."

- Sen. Ron Wyden -

Tyson Slocum
Tyson Slocum
Director, Public Citizen Energy Program

"Because lifting the ban would cause U.S. benchmark oil prices to rise, companies likely would have a greater incentive to increase production... With all of the increased production coming from controversial fracking techniques, lifting the ban not only would raise gasoline prices for U.S. families, but would create bigger environmental headaches."

- Tyson Slocum -

Mike McKenna
Mike McKenna
President, MWR Strategies; GOP Energy Strategist

"Five years from now... exporting crude is going to be fairly noncontroversial. But when in the next five years it becomes noncontroversial, I can't predict... [Backing an end to the ban is] a little risky... because every time gas prices go up, you're going to wind up getting dinged... When most people think about energy independence, they don't think about a great big wall around the country... They think about, 'Could the U.S., if we needed to, supply all of our own energy?'"

- Mike McKenna -

Oil Change International
Oil Change International

"In order to play its part in meeting global climate goals, it is imperative that the United States maintains the ban on crude oil exports and does everything it can to decrease, rather than increase, the global pool of fossil fuel reserves that are exploited."

- Oil Change International -

Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo

"Having analyzed the data regarding crude oil prices and U.S. wholesale gasoline prices, we are comfortable stating that U.S. gasoline consumers are benefiting from the inability to freely export U.S. produced crude oil... We provide evidence that U.S. gasoline consumers are benefiting from the restrictions on crude oil exports."

- Wells Fargo -

Janet Mullins Grissom
Janet Mullins Grissom
Partner, Peck, Madigan, Jones; Lobbyist, Consumers and Refiners United for Domestic Energy (CRUDE)

"Why is it that our gas prices haven't spiked during this turmoil in the Middle East the way they did a few years ago? ... Because we've got all this domestic supply [that cannot be sent overseas]."

- Janet Mullins Grissom -

Sen. Robert Menendez
Sen. Robert Menendez
D-NJ, Chairman, Senate Foreign Relations Committee

"Lifting the crude oil export ban means Big Oil will export oil until the world price and the American price are the same. We should keep American oil in America just as we have for the last 40 years."

- Sen. Robert Menendez -

Daniel J. Weiss
Daniel J. Weiss
Senior Vice President of Campaigns, League of Conservation Voters; former Senior Fellow and Director of Climate Strategy Center at American Progress

"Selling crude oil at a higher price on the world market would pad the bank accounts of oil companies, but it could also raise gasoline prices at home and increase our imports. To protect the pocketbooks of families and businesses and maintain our energy security, we should keep American oil here at home."

- Daniel J. Weiss -

Sen. Edward J. Markey
Sen. Edward J. Markey
D-MA

"[The Commerce decision] puts America on a slippery slope to send more of our oil abroad, even at a time when the Middle East is in disarray and tensions are running high with Russia. We should keep our resources here at home for American families and businesses, not send this oil abroad even as we import oil from dangerous regions of the world ... Congress put this oil export ban in place. It should be Congress that decides when and how to change it, not through a private ruling by the Commerce Department without public debate."

- Sen. Edward J. Markey -

Sen. John Hoeven
Sen. John Hoeven
R-ND

"We have to make sure it won't impact the price at the pump, and until we make that determination, I'm not on board."

- Sen. John Hoeven -

Bill Day
Bill Day
Vice President - Communications, Valero

"The current situation is working fine and doesn't need to change. We buy oil and take it to our refineries, turn it into gasoline, diesel and other refined fuels since those are higher-valued products that help decrease the trade deficit ... It would do more harm than good and lead to higher prices in the U.S. for consumers. I don't fault oil producers for seeking to lift the ban because crude oil is selling for less in the U.S. than overseas."

- Bill Day -

Rep. Gene Green
Rep. Gene Green
D-TX

"I want to take it one step at a time. I am not just for throwing the door open to exports."

- Rep. Gene Green -

Rep. John Culberson
Rep. John Culberson
R-TX

"We need to make sure it is done in a systematic way. We need to take care of Americans' needs first."

- Rep. John Culberson -

Ilana Solomon
Ilana Solomon
Director, Responsible Trade Program at Sierra Club

"Encouraging trade in dirty fossil fuels would mean more dangerous fracking here in the U.S. and would push more climate-disrupting fuels into the European Union. The oil and gas industry is the only winner in this situation."

- Ilana Solomon -

Graeme Burnett
Graeme Burnett
Senior Vice President - Fuels Optimization, Delta Air Lines

"If we lift the export ban we would in essence be allowing the transport of crude out of a competitive market in this country and into a less competitive global one controlled by a few oil producing states. The results would be easy to predict: U.S. crude would flow out of this country and onto the world market. OPEC would reduce supply to maintain high global prices. The United States' use of homegrown oil would diminish and prices here at home would rise to match the higher global price for a barrel of crude."

- Graeme Burnett -

Jeffrey Peck
Jeffrey Peck
Principal, Peck Madigan Jones; Lobbyist for CRUDE, Consumers and Refiners United for Domestic Energy

"Once people understand the market for crude oil is not free, they quickly recognize traditional principles of free trade don't apply here."

- Jeffrey Peck -

Sen. Joe Manchin
Sen. Joe Manchin
D-WV

"I think basically until we become energy independent we ought to carefully consider what we do with our energy resources, absolutely."

- Sen. Joe Manchin -

Make your voice heard to help Unleash America’s Energy. Sign the petition to lift the crude oil export ban at canaryusa.com/talkcrude/
The post Everybody Talks (Crude): A Comprehensive List of Public Figures For and Against the Crude Export Ban appeared first on Canary, LLC.

Dr. Meg Jordan, PhD, RN, CWP, is Co-President of the National Wellness Institute, author of HOW TO BE A HEALTH COACH, Department Chair and Professor of Integrative Health Studies M.A. Program at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco.  She is a medical anthropologist, and behavioral health specialist.  mjordan@ciis.edu

 

 
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