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Action Learning
From:
Doug Gray, PhD, PCC Doug Gray, PhD, PCC
For Immediate Release:
Dateline: Nashville , TN
Monday, May 13, 2019

 
Action Learninghttps://action-learning.comExecutive Coaching, Nashville, TNSat, 27 Apr 2019 02:58:20 +0000 en-UShourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1.1https://action-learning.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/cropped-ALA-transparent-icon1-32x32.jpgAction Learninghttps://action-learning.com3232Protected: OKRs-LKQhttps://action-learning.com/okrs-lkq-private/https://action-learning.com/okrs-lkq-private/#respondSat, 27 Apr 2019 01:12:40 +0000https://action-learning.com/?p=2706There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.

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How Data Speakshttps://action-learning.com/how-data-speaks/https://action-learning.com/how-data-speaks/#respondSun, 21 Apr 2019 00:15:58 +0000https://action-learning.com/?p=2699FACT:  Data Speaks. Consider how this creepy image speaks to you. This week, U.S. attorney General William Barr released a 400-page redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election to Congress and the public.  Consider how that data speaks to you.   A client suggested that most people “see-speak-hear” […]

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FACT:  Data Speaks.

Consider how this creepy image speaks to you.

This week, U.S. attorney General William Barr released a 400-page redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election to Congress and the public.  Consider how that data speaks to you.   A client suggested that most people “see-speak-hear” that data as if we were monkeys… filled with bias.

Consider how these 3 data points speak to you…

  1. Twitter removed 70 million fraudulent accounts in only two months in 2018 (source: Inc, May 2019)
  2. Facebook removed 583 million fake accounts in the first three months of 2019 (source: Inc, May 2019)
  3. In my world of leadership consulting, “a lengthy global effort to create standards for reporting human capital metrics is expected to be announced this week. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) will issue its guidelines for 23 human capital reporting measures, including a Leadership Trust Index (LTI) that may inform institutional investors, private investors and global business leaders” (Steve Maxwell presenting at the Center for Talent Reporting Annual Conference, February 21, 2019).

FACT:  All leaders and managers struggle to collect and analyze data. 

You probably know that ISO standards have defined quality improvement and safety investments in countless organizations since they were first introduced in 1947.  These worldwide proprietary, industrial and commercial standards have been adopted in 164 countries.

What if your organization collected and distributed data on the following 23 human capital measures into these 9 categories?

  1. Ethics (number and type of employee grievances filed; number and type of concluded disciplinary actions; percentage of employees who have completed training on compliance and ethics)
  2. Costs (total workforce costs)
  3. Workforce diversity (with respect to age, gender, disability, and “other indicators of diversity”; and diversity of leadership team)
  4. Leadership (“leadership trust,” to be determined by employee surveys)
  5. Organizational safety, health, and well-being (lost time for injury; number of occupational accidents; number of people killed during work)
  6. Productivity (EBIT/revenue/turnover/profit per employee; human capital ROI, or the ratio of income or revenue to human capital)
  7. Recruitment, mobility, and turnover (average time to fill vacant positions; average time to fill critical business positions; percentage of positions filled internally; percentage of critical business positions filled internally; turnover rate)
  8. Skills and capabilities (total development and training costs)
  9. Workforce availability (number of employees; full-time equivalents)

How would that data speak in your world?

Privately held companies may use these human capital data for directional initiatives such as replacing managers with high turnover ratios identified as “toxic managers” or investing in high growth departments that require training in OKR leadership skills. For details contact us.

Publicly held companies may use these human capital data for multi-directional initiatives designed to retain more diverse employees, eliminating bias in hiring, or retaining desired employees with external coaching and consulting.  For details see www.hcmi.co.

Consider one final example.   Imagine a 17-year district sales manager who had regularly been promoted within her company as recognition for her history of ratings that “exceed expectations.”  Then she was asked to relocate into a new geography and had 4 different managers within 5 years.  The goal incentives were increased 300%.  She had to hire 3 new direct reports within 8 weeks.  Then her new manager stated that she “should not speak to anyone in the corporate office, even when he did not repeatedly provide required information for business decisions.”  How does that data speak?

FACT:  All leaders and managers struggle to collect and analyze data. 

OPINION:  I predict massive changes ahead in public accountability and transparency and data-driven decision making.  

If you need expertise in collecting and analyzing data for your organization, then you should contact us today.

FACT:  The market demands that you will increase the probability of competitive success if you can make more informed decisions before others.

In response to a client’s request, I created a free digital course called “OKR Leadership Skills” that you can take here.  The Objectives and Key Results (OKR) management process has enabled countless F100 and small business leaders to increase accountability and transparency.  OKR leadership has been described as the “secret sauce” that explains the largest migration of financial assets in human history to Silicon Valley in the last 30 years.  OKR leadership is another example of How Data Speaks. 

Here’s to you, at your best,

Doug Gray, PhD, PCC, CEO of Action Learning Associates, LLC

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Telling Stories; Using systems thinking to help your business clients attain meaningful outcomeshttps://action-learning.com/telling-stories-using-systems-thinking-to-help-your-business-clients-attain-meaningful-outcomes/https://action-learning.com/telling-stories-using-systems-thinking-to-help-your-business-clients-attain-meaningful-outcomes/#respondMon, 25 Mar 2019 01:16:39 +0000https://action-learning.com/?p=2690I recently published the following article on Corporate leadership. This article is reproduced with permission from  Choice, the Magazine of Professional Coaching  in this link:  choice_V17N1_issue_Doug Gray Here is the text of the article for you to share… Title:   Telling Stories; Using systems thinking to help your business clients attain meaningful outcomes Throughout recorded history, […]

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I recently published the following article on Corporate leadership.

This article is reproduced with permission from  Choice, the Magazine of Professional Coaching  in this link:  choice_V17N1_issue_Doug Gray

Here is the text of the article for you to share…

Title:   Telling Stories; Using systems thinking to help your business clients attain meaningful outcomes

Throughout recorded history, for over 4,500 years, we have used stories to teach and entertain.

Coaches use stories. Coaches teach to add value to clients. By definition, coaching is a collaborative process for clients to attain meaningful outcomes.

Are you using stories to add value for your clients?

Here are two case studies that you can apply to your corporate coaching business immediately.

Case Study 1.    Recently I explained Systems Thinking to a client who owns a small leadership development business using professional actors. This CEO was struggling to articulate the unique value of his company. And he needed to prepare for a big meeting with a prospective buyer that could lead to a potential 500 percent increase above his previous annual revenue.

He was excited and scared. I mentioned leverage, Archimedes, and the idea that “with a big enough lever one could move the world.” When he wanted examples, I told him a story about applied systems thinking that Macdonald, Burk and Stewart (2006) implemented at entrenched mining companies in Australia. Those leaders were unable to see past the obstacles in front of them, such as safety incidents, high turnover and absenteeism, and erratic productivity costs.  Then they created transformational changes.

When my CEO client wanted to find simple words to describe the cascading effects of organizational change, he drew a model with concentric circles like a bulls-eye. (I encourage you to take a pen or pencil and write this down. It is a simple model that works well.)

The smallest ring was unlabeled, to represent the chaotic core of deep change. The second outer ring was “individual” to represent the changes that leaders need to make. The third outer ring was “team” to represent the group of two or more people that add leverage. If that group has one scoreboard, then by definition they are a team. The fourth outer ring was “organizational” to represent the scope of leaders influencing others toward a better vision of the future. The core skill of such leaders is public optimism.

So, I encouraged this client to find the words to describe a better future for his organization. He developed a story using a pebble dropped into a pool of calm water. This CEO client needed to know that others have applied leverage. He needed a simple structure that he could adopt. You can adopt this model immediately.

One result from his client meeting is that he literally “found the words” and developed his own story about leverage. He developed new marketing content. He improved his reputation. He asked for the business. Yes, he won the big engagement with that new prospect. And yes, he did grow his business 500 percent above the previous annual revenue.

Outcome-based coaching is critical for any leader. Perhaps you can do something similar in your coaching business?

Case Study 2.

The second story encourages leaders to apply leverage to a bigger vision of a better future.

Like many International Coach Federation (ICF) members, I volunteer as a board member at our local chapter to plan annual activities. One of our colleagues leads the corporate Learning and Development group at Bridgestone Americas (a leading automotive company). She needed to develop programs using Systems Thinking.

Specifically, she needed to prepare to replace an aging workforce, and had developed programs with the largest university in the state, using values from their company and partnering with the US Naval Academy and US Army at West Point.

They needed to teach essential leadership skills using their company values at a public university. Concurrently, Bridgestone needed to relocate 30-50 percent of their senior leaders from two other states to their new corporate headquarters in Nashville, TN, without losing significant intellectual capital or market capital.

She was both excited and overwhelmed about the changes ahead for Bridgestone. She needed to discuss ways to apply Senge’s (2006) model of a learning organization to those changes. I volunteered some stories to help her design solutions. My hope is that she has the corporate leadership executive sponsorship and required resources to implement systems thinking at that organization.  We all need to transform organizations.

CONCLUSIONS

Notice the pattern? Leaders, by definition, influence others toward a better future. They find the words. They seek partners. They use leverage to gain results. Whether you are coaching a small business owner or a director in a large organization, you can help your clients attain meaningful outcomes.

The cornerstone of systems thinking is personal mastery, defined as “continually becoming” (Senge, 2006). In all major religions and most philosophies, there is a recognition that humans are aspirational. We stare at the clouds, stars and weather patterns and try to understand objective “reality.” We stare at social media and fear-based stimuli and try to determine useful “facts.” We work with clients who are stuck. We help our clients overcome perceived obstacles. Thankfully, humans are continually developing. Amid those chaotic stimuli, we tell stories to teach, entertain, and achieve meaningful outcomes.

As coaches, our primary role is to help others attain meaningful outcomes. Case studies are one way to help our clients make smarter decisions today.

A coaching query is: How are you using case studies or stories to help your clients attain meaningful outcomes?

REFERENCES:

ICF (2016). 2016 Global Coaching Study; Executive Summary. International Coaching Federation.

MacDonald, I., Burke, C., & Stewart, K. (2006). Systems Leadership: creating positive organizations. Hampshire, England: Gower.

Senge, P. M. (2006). The Fifth Discipline: The art and practice of the learning organiza- tion. Random House/Currency.

Author Bio:  Doug Gray, PhD, has been an International Coaching Federation certified coach at the PCC level since 2006.  He is CEO of Action Learning Associates, LLC. His dissertation explored global executive coaching and leader outcomes.  He models systems thinking by serving hundreds of clients.  Contact him today. 

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How to teach OKRs and leadershiphttps://action-learning.com/how-to-teach-okrs-and-leadership/https://action-learning.com/how-to-teach-okrs-and-leadership/#respondMon, 11 Mar 2019 02:14:28 +0000https://action-learning.com/?p=2678You have probably had the experience of teaching someone how to drive a car.  If not, imagine the scene.   Your objective is to teach enough basic skills so that your loved one can drive away.  You start by teaching safety protocols like “wear your seat belt” and “always keep two hands on the steering […]

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You have probably had the experience of teaching someone how to drive a car.  If not, imagine the scene.

Your objective is to teach enough basic skills so that your loved one can drive away.  You start by teaching safety protocols like “wear your seat belt” and “always keep two hands on the steering wheel at “9 and 3.”  Then you explain the functions of the gas pedal, brake pedal, gears and all those shiny buttons on the dashboard.  Then you offer encouragement as your loved one shifts into gear and drives from 0 to 30 mph within a minute.  Your Key Results (KRs) often follow that formula “from x to y by date.” 

     Objectives are defined as “what you do.”  They are qualitative and each person in the organization can write their own.

     Key Results are defined as “how you measure that objective.”  They are quantitative and answer the formula “as measured by.”

     OKRs are defined as “a management methodology that helps people focus efforts on the same important issues throughout the organization.”

The “Father of OKRs” title is attributed to Andy Grove, the founder and CEO of Intel.  You may know that Andy literally wrote the textbook on semiconductors in 1967, well before Silicon Valley attracted the largest migration of assets in human history.   You may also know that Andy wrote “Only the Paranoid Survive” in 1996, as a reminder of market volatility and the need to measure the details.  His father was killed at Auschwitz, and he fled Nazism with his mother at age 20.

John Doerr worked for Andy.  John learned how to implement OKRs.  Then, in 1997, John made an $11.8M investment in 12% of Google when working as a venture capitalist at Kleiner-Perkins.  The co-founders of Google wanted to organize data globally.  When John introduced OKRs to Google, Larry Page said, “Well, we need to adopt some management approach.”  The rest is history.  I recommend John Doerr’s book, Measure What Matters, (2018) for examples ranging from the Gates Foundation to Bono.

     Here are my examples of teaching OKRs to leaders in a small business and a large business.

     I was consulting the CEO and owner of a $40M retail business that required succession planning to transition the next generation of leaders.  At a management meeting I observed that the managers did not describe their business using any metrics.  I asked the owner, “Where are the metrics that these managers are using to drive their business?”  He sighed with fatigue, like so many small business owners.  I provided OKR definitions and templates and a free course on OKR leadership skills that you can access here.  Then I worked with several key managers.  One manager’s objective was to increase profit margins by 6% Y/Y.  KR1 was to identify current measures for sales, expenses, overhead, profit within 30 days.  KR2 was to distribute a one-page business summary to all other managers within 40 days.  KR3 was to track and reward increased profit margins within 60 days.  The result of his OKR leadership was that he modeled accountability, transparency and business results for the other managers within 60 days.

     I was consulting the president of a Fortune 500 business with $5B in annual revenue and over 10,000 full time employees in North America.  Their 20-year-old company grew quickly as a result of acquisitions.  The result was that silos of trust and information sharing were preventing consistent accounting practices.  I asked, “How are you measuring your desired results?”  He stuttered and said, “Not well.  We increased revenue and retained a lot of good people but sometimes I wonder if we’re measuring what we need to be measuring.”  I provided some OKR definitions and templates and vendor resources.  Then he defined his OKRs and shared them with his top 60 leaders in a training that I delivered.   Then I provided team coaching for those top 60 leaders so that they could cascade OKRs throughout their organization for three months. The results were uneven, as we expected.  People were experimenting with the OKR language as if they were new vocabulary words.  Three months of uneven applications passed.  The OKR process gained momentum in the annual meeting when the president spoke to 650 of their top leaders.  He declared, “As long as I’m in this role we are going to implement OKRs and increase our profit margins.”  He shared his business OKRs.  Minutes later, I followed him onto the main stage to introduce OKRs to those 650 leaders.  I led demonstrations with 6 of his top leaders.  Then I lead workshops to practice implementing OKRs within their organization.  His KRs included training, technology, and rewards tied to increased profit margins.  We are still assessing the impact of that OKR process.

The challenge of OKRs is not in introducing them as an initiative.   Anyone can introduce an evidence-based initiative.  

     The challenge in the OKR process is adopting an ongoing cadence of accountability and rewards.  Learning requires feedback.  Managers, by definition, need to maximize the productivity of others.  The core skill of managers is coaching.  We trademarked the AD-FITTM coaching process to teach managers the required steps to provide feedback to others.   Our experience is that those managers who adopt the AD-FITTM process accelerate the performance and behavior outcomes of others.   For a free course on how to apply the AD-FITTM process for Managers click here.

Smart managers and leaders typically understand OKRs pretty quickly.  The challenge is “in the details” as Andy Grove reminded us.  Over 30% of the companies on today’s NYSE and F500 did not exist 20 years ago.  There is no reason to assume that your organization should exist 20 years from now. 

We should talk about your organization if you need to respond to market changes.  If you would like a free course on OKR leadership skills with definitions and templates, then click here.  We would be delighted to work with you.  Call any time.

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2018https://action-learning.com/2018/https://action-learning.com/2018/#respondThu, 27 Dec 2018 17:08:25 +0000https://action-learning.com/?p=2576Here are some gifts from 2018 that I’d like to share with you, my clients and associates. I strongly recommend that you save this url in your contact for “Doug Gray” or “Action Learning Associates.” You may want to download this new content and add it to your digital folder for “Action Learning Associates.”   There are […]

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Here are some gifts from 2018 that I’d like to share with you, my clients and associates.

I strongly recommend that you save this url in your contact for “Doug Gray” or “Action Learning Associates.”

You may want to download this new content and add it to your digital folder for “Action Learning Associates.”   There are many great resources here!

Here’s to you, at your best!  When playing with new friends like Spider Monkeys, or not.

Q4 included several customized leadership development workshops.

  • One F500 client wanted to “develop a culture of fiscal accountability using Objectives and Key Results (OKRs).”  If you are a client and want to see the customized app that included that content please contact me here.
  • One client wanted to “introduce positive psychology practices into their organization.”  Over 1,300 people have viewed the content here.
  • One F500 client wanted to “develop the executive presence and the reputations of their leaders.”   A video of that content is here.
  •  Several small business leaders wanted succession planning content to accelerate their leadership to the next generation.

Q3 included trademarking the AD-FIT model for any managers or professional coaches to use.

  • Many clients asked, “What works?”  They needed a process or protocol to cascade consistent expectations to direct reports, to serve clients, to lead others effectively.
  • A 90-second video explanation is at https://action-learning.com/ and here
  • The AD-FIT process for external providers, consultants and coaches is at https://www.whycoachesfail.com/ .
  • The AD-FIT process for managers and leaders is at https://action-learning.com/products/
  • The AD-FIT Level 1 Certification Course is at www.WhyCoachesFail.  If you are a client and would like free access please contact me here.
  • Many consultants, managers and professional coaches have completed the AD-FIT Level 1 Certification Course.  And I have been invited to share the AD-FIT model at the Metrics That Matter conference hosted by Explorance, in March, 2019.  Contact me for licensing details.

Q2 included my PhD in Organizational Leadership dissertation defense from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

  • My dissertation title was “Positive Psychology Coaching Protocols: Creating Competitive Advantage for Leader Development.
  • My abstract / summary was:  A gap exists between positive psychology coaching (PPC) theory and practice because PPC lacks rigorous measurement, evidence-based protocols and standard processes. This quasi-experimental study assessed the relationship between PPC protocols and performance or behavioral outcomes of leaders. The participants were global professional coaches (n = 220) who completed two sets of surveys after delivering 90 days of coaching, and completed approximately 60 minutes of digital training. The primary assessments were (a) the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ-12), (b) the Values in Action (VIA-72) questionnaire, and (c) the Outcome Measures Survey that included the Goal Attainment Satisfaction (GAS) score. The PPC protocols included compliance using assessments, defining meaningful coaching outcomes, compliance over time, and compliance with the AD-FIT coaching protocol. Those participants with higher compliance to the AD-FIT coaching protocol (n = 16) reported slightly higher goal attainment scores than the participants with lower compliance (n = 18). Open text box analysis was conducted to deepen understanding of the relationship between participation and leader outcomes. The top two performance outcomes (n =100 responses) were increased productivity and focus. The top two behavior outcomes (n =115 responses) were improved relationships and effectiveness. The theoretical, methodological and practical significance of this research indicate opportunities to create competitive advantage in leader development.
  • A riveting 60-minute video of the dissertation defense with research findings is hosted at https://www.youtube.com/user/dgrayful/videos
  • In Q4 the dissertation was finally published online for researchers at ProQuest.  If you’d like a copy in PDF please contact me.
  • Yes, you may now call me Dr. Doug Gray, if you wish.

Q1 included a website redesign and marketing with new content.

A final note for your files…

All of you who are individual or team coaching clients are familiar with this new client intake document.   Here is a very generous gift.  When I work with leaders I ALWAYS use the AD-FIT process.  Since 1997.  It works.  Outcome-based coaching is a straightforward process.   I strongly recommend that YOU adopt the AD-FIT protocols.  Click on the bullet below.  Then download the content.  Then use these 28 validated outcomes for executive coaching or business coaching.  Leaders practice leadership, just as physicians practice medicine and attorneys practice law.

A friend recently asked why I like to GIVE AWAY so much content to my clients and associates.  I have several answers:

  1.   You are my champions and buying agents who will download and share this new content as you see fit.
  2.   My ancestors are teachers and ministers, accustomed to sharing practical knowledge.  I know what works.
  3.   I can share everything I know, and still know it.  Wisdom is meant to be shared.

May you have an OUTSTANDING 2019!

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Should You Invest In A Leadership Workshop For Your Team?https://action-learning.com/should-you-invest-in-a-leadership-workshop-for-your-team/https://action-learning.com/should-you-invest-in-a-leadership-workshop-for-your-team/#respondTue, 11 Dec 2018 20:26:53 +0000https://action-learning.com/?p=2550Managers, by definition, must maximize the productivity of others.  When we ask audiences, “How many of you are managers?” over 70% of the audience typically raise their hands.  Many do not have the word “manager” in their title. As managers, you know that it is your job to maximize productivity and outcomes from your employees.  You […]

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leadership wokshops

Managers, by definition, must maximize the productivity of others.  When we ask audiences, “How many of you are managers?” over 70% of the audience typically raise their hands.  Many do not have the word “manager” in their title.

As managers, you know that it is your job to maximize productivity and outcomes from your employees.  You need evidence-based best practices in leadership development.  Today.  And you need to demonstrate the ROI of that leadership workshop within 90 – 180 days.  There is a myth that leadership development programs should only be scheduled in the spring and fall, to avoid conflicts with vacations.  The reality is that leadership development workshops include both direct and virtual content that reinforces your outcomes.  Our programs last 3-12 months.  You should invest in a leadership development provider (like Action Learning Associates) because it is cost-effective and efficient.  Your core business is something else.  Our core business is to accelerate leader development.

Here are three reasons why YOU SHOULD invest in a leadership development workshop today.  

  1.  Investment in a leadership workshop should directly increase your team’s engagement 

Leaders need to practice leadership, just as attorneys practice law and physicians practice medicine.  Many studies have shown that when employees are engaged in leadership workshops they are then more likely to be engaged in the workforce. An employee who is more engaged is a) more effective at required tasks, b) more efficient on key performance indicators or objectives and key results (OKRs), and c) more likely to stay employed at your organization.  Retention of desired employees is a requirement in today’s competitive Talent Economy.  Be smart.  You never want to retain average employees- but you DO WANT to retain 100% of your desired employees.  And leadership development workshops are the most cost-effective way for you to increase retention of your desired employees.  We recommend that 70% of your promotions are internal, to encourage career ladders and talent succession.  We strongly recommend that you invest in 100% of your top performers with leadership development programs AT LEAST twice/ year.

2.  Investment in leadership workshops can help you develop your workplace culture

Culture can be developed, and must be developed, in response to changing market demands.  Ask anyone involved in leadership development coaching, and they will tell you that culture cannot be left to chance.   That would be reckless.   The academics describe culture as “how organizations function.”   As an example, we recently provided a leadership development workshop around ONE objective, “to create a culture of fiscal accountability using Objectives and Key Results (OKRs).”  Let me explain…

Culture is best described using three overlapping circles.  Label each circle as: 1) underlying assumptions, 2) espoused behavior, and 3) artifacts.

1) underlying assumptions are the shared beliefs of your organization, including history of acquisitions, traits of key leaders who get promoted faster, competencies of leaders with higher reputations, or that unspoken assumption you have about a market or colleague.

2) espoused behaviors describe what we say we do, including common phrases such as “I’ll solve this” or “that’s not my problem.” Notice the difference between what we say we do, and what we actually do.

3) artifacts are tangible symbols of the culture, such as a new National  office in Nashville, TN for centralized services and consistent management of others. The cultural values posted in the lobby are artifacts of how you work.

Fact:  All three of these aspects of culture can change quickly.  Therefore, you NEED to invest in leadership development workshops to develop your desired organizational culture.   Today.  

3.  Investment in a leadership workshop should improve employee morale

Many studies have shown that large organizations are investing less time, money, energy and training  in their employees than they did 10 years ago.  Professional development discretionary budgets have plummeted from over $10,000 per person in 2008 to $4,000 per person in 2018.   Today, we invest more into maintaining cars and machines than we do in our most critical variable-  people.  That trend is reckless.   If you are investing less in your people than you did 10 years ago then you are LITERALLY in a race to the bottom of your market.   Look at the fact that only 35% of today’s F500 companies have been there for more than 50 years.  If you want to increase employee morale, then you need to invest in your top employees.  Nothing is a more critical investment.  Today.  Employee morale is NOT a lagging indicator.  If you want to develop agile problem solvers, then you need to invest in leadership development workshops.  You can make employee morale into a leading indicator.  Today.

You should not invest in a leadership workshop IF you do not care about 1) employee engagement, 2) workplace culture, or 3) employee morale.  We do NOT want to talk to you.  We wish you Godspeed.

You should invest in a leadership workshop IF you do care about 1) employee engagement, 2) workplace culture, or 3) employee morale.  We DO want to talk to you.  Today.  

We provide outcome-based leadership development workshops that guarantee your results.  We deliver programs throughout the United States and Canada.  We provide expert leadership coaching and executive coaching services, based in Nashville, TN or globally.  We’d like to visit you ASAP.

Contact us here.  Today.

If you are based in the Nashville, TN area then we are neighbors.  See details for leadership training for your employees here.   We’d like to visit you ASAP.

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What to Expect in a Leadership Workshophttps://action-learning.com/what-to-expect-in-a-leadership-workshop/https://action-learning.com/what-to-expect-in-a-leadership-workshop/#respondTue, 11 Dec 2018 20:04:43 +0000https://action-learning.com/?p=2547Do you think that you a born leader?  That is a myth.  The reality is that leadership skills can be taught and developed.  By definition, leaders influence the behavior of others by describing a better vision of the future.  The primary skill of effective leaders is public optimism.  Leaders tell great stories and share optimism.   […]

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leadership wokshops

Do you think that you a born leader?  That is a myth. 

The reality is that leadership skills can be taught and developed.  By definition, leaders influence the behavior of others by describing a better vision of the future.  The primary skill of effective leaders is public optimism.  Leaders tell great stories and share optimism.  

Those leadership skills can be taught in a workshop or program.  The most effective leadership workshops include training and coaching, then more training and coaching, to reinforce desired behaviors over time.  Repetition works.

Leaders must adapt to change.  At a recent leadership workshop one executive stated,  “We need to master this content in the next 3 days because we are each the CEOs of our business.  We need to create our future business.”   That urgency is common.

Many of the tactics that leaders were taught 10-20 years ago are obsolete today.  Management by Objectives (MBOs) and Forced Rankings are now considered manipulative, ineffective, and counterproductive. That kind of “leadership” will limit your career. 

We know that rigid managers and leaders prevent innovation and problem solving.  We also know that agility can be taught and developed.    We can teach agile leaders and managers to promote effective outcomes, efficiency, and employee engagement.  

Today, many employees demand fulfillment and purpose.  They want to feel inspired and know their place in society and their contribution to the world.  

We know that leaders need to practice leadership, just as physicians practice medicine and attorneys practice law.  All managers and leaders struggle. 

A great leadership workshop should provide:

  • Leadership exercises and experiential activities that encourage open communication and sharing of ideas
  • Profound breakthroughs in understanding how to influence others.
  • Lectures, digital workbooks, videos, powerpoint slides, and activities designed to model engagement
  • Pre-assessments and Post-assessments to discover your strengths and track the ROI of your investment
  • Leadership development coaching to help key leaders assess their strengths and define a meaningful outcome 
  • Group problem-solving tasks that encourage conflict resolution through a better understanding of human behavior and group dynamics
  • Customized apps with content to download and distribute your consistent messages throughout your organization

A recent client stated, “This was by far the most useful leadership development program I have experienced in over 20 years of forced participation in some kind of training.  The content was easy to understand.  All of the sessions were  customized for our organization.  All of the consultants were experts.  We were fully engaged in each session.  We did our work.  And now I have the skills I need to lead my team in a new and useful methodology.”  

All of our leadership workshops use our trademarked positive psychology AD-FIT™ process.  We typically include our leadership development coaching to assess your strengths and increase your probability of achieving your outcome-based results.

The best leadership workshops should ask you to take an honest assessment of your professional leadership style and define measurable outcomes.  We typically use both quantitative and qualitative assessments.   We offer both virtual and direct workshops with several exciting results-oriented topics to choose from.   See the list of leadership workshop topics here.

We provide services throughout the U.S and Canada.  We recently delivered programs in Chicago, IL, Charlotte, NC, Louisville, KY and Washington, DC.  If you are near the Nashville, TN area, an executive coach in Nashville can help you. 

If you are ready to learn more, please contact us.  Today.

We look forward to providing the outcome-based solutions you demand.  Call us today at 615.236.9845.

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Proposals, feedback process, and why dogs are wiser than you.https://action-learning.com/proposals-feedback-process-and-why-dogs-are-wiser-than-you/https://action-learning.com/proposals-feedback-process-and-why-dogs-are-wiser-than-you/#respondFri, 30 Nov 2018 04:24:48 +0000https://action-learning.com/?p=2535THE PROCESS IS SPONSORED BY: Action-Learning.com How to make your next proposal better than your last one. Let’s face it, of all the skills you can bring to bear to help your clients, the limiting factor is your ability to get proposals signed. You need to make money. You want to share your genius with the […]

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THE PROCESS IS SPONSORED BY: Action-Learning.com

How to make your next proposal better than your last one.

Let’s face it, of all the skills you can bring to bear to help your clients, the limiting factor is your ability to get proposals signed. You need to make money. You want to share your genius with the world world. You need to get your proposal written and sold. You need to deliver value at each step of the sales process. Here are three great ways to write coaching proposals that sell. You can be smarter than your competitors.

  1. Less fluff, more value.  Your job is to add value and solve your client’s problems. Nothing else matters. Your model, framework, tactic or magical gifts do NOT provide value to your client. Your solution is the value. Stay focused on the results you can deliver.

2.  Fewer credentials, more results.  Congratulations, your certification/ degree is a huge accomplishment. But nobody understands what it means. Make sure more space is devoted to results than credentials.

3.  Make it easy to understand.  If your buyer has to exercise their brain to realize how good your proposal is, then you haven’t done the work required to make it great. Keep the structure simple.

The Feedback Process

EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR: Tom Stone

We all talk about feedback a lot. Most leaders think they do it well. But my opinion is that we simply don’t know how to give feedback well. The problem is our inability to give good feedback creates problems down the road.

A lack of feedback gives people unspoken approval for unacceptable behavior. This false approval encourages people to continue patterns of behavior that don’t help them or anyone else.

But it gets worse. Everyone in an organization is constantly evaluating competency. So a lack of feedback not only affects the person who needs to receive, but it also affects everybody else who knows that feedback should be given.

A leader is never out from under the microscope. Giving good feedback is one of the surest ways to encourage effective behavior and to demonstrate leadership competency. It is a skill that can be learned, and we can learn to teach it and demand it as part of our culture.

Feedback leads to learning.

The Leadership Wisdom of Dogs

EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR: Krissi Barr

The attributes, traits and characteristics that separate leaders from the rest of the pack can be clearly seen in the behavior of dogs: loyalty, perseverance, friendship, teamwork, honesty, bravery, ingenuity, playfulness, curiosity and an unflagging desire for more information.I call it the Fido Factor.

Faithful leaders earn the trust of their team and their customers by doing the right things and living up to their word.

Inspirational leaders move people to do the meaningful and the extraordinary.

Determined leaders combine perseverance with a dose of fearlessness to keep moving toward goals.

Observant leaders are committed to taking in as much information as possible in order to make the best decisions.

Get More Krissi:

Her book: https://www.amazon.com/Fido-Factor-Krissi-Barr/dp/0999165607

What the heck is The Process? 

Our Credo: (if you like these beliefs, then you’ll love us)

1.      Chaos in the marketplace for “professional coaching” can be reduced with outcome-based protocols.

2.      The strengths of professional coaches (e.g., integrity, fairness, collaboration, leadership, bravery) can be leveraged to co-create the future of professional coaching.

3.      Teams are stronger than individuals. Collaborative projects reduce individual risk and yield higher rewards.

4.      Expert leadership coaches and authors will contribute best practices and attract more users or followers.

FACT:

There are over 50,000 “professional coaches” in a $7B global industry that lacks professionalism.  Literally anyone with a business card can self-declare that they are a “professional coach.”

OPINION:

The result is chaos in the marketplace, unethical practices, and a market ripe for disruption and consolidation.

The Process is a community of expert leadership consultants and coaches.  Join us.

Your Next Steps (How you can help):

1.     Are you subscribed to the Process? If not, click here

2.     Forward this email to ALL the leadership consultants you know.

3.     Are you an expert?      Yes, you are.   Submit some expert content and share your genius with the world. Click here.

Thanks for being part of The Process,

Patrick E. McLean and Doug Gray

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]]>https://action-learning.com/proposals-feedback-process-and-why-dogs-are-wiser-than-you/feed/0The Importance of Active Listening in Executive Coachinghttps://action-learning.com/the-importance-of-active-listening-in-executive-coaching/https://action-learning.com/the-importance-of-active-listening-in-executive-coaching/#respondTue, 16 Oct 2018 23:41:19 +0000https://action-learning.com/?p=2478Communication problems abound.  The #1 complaint from leaders and managers is “poor communication.”  Today, effective communication is more important than ever and developing active listening skills is a necessity in all aspects of your professional and personal life…  You can learn to be a better active listener.   Executive coaching requires expertise in communication skills such […]

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Action Learning Associates
Franklin, TN
704.995.6647