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302 – She spoke on all 7 Continents: Tom interviews Barbara Glanz
From:
Tom Antion -- Internet Marketing Expert Tom Antion -- Internet Marketing Expert
For Immediate Release:
Dateline: Virginia Beach , VA
Wednesday, July 01, 2020

 

Episode 302 – Barbara Glanz
[00:00:09] Welcome to Screw the Commune, the entrepreneurial podcast dedicated to getting you out of the car and into the money with your host, lifelong entrepreneur and multimillionaire Tom Antion.

[00:00:24] Hey, everybody. It's Tom here with episode 302 of Screw the Commute podcast. We're here with Barbara Glanz. And she's a member of the prestigious Speaker Hall of Fame and she's a CSP and CPAE.

[00:00:38] That's means big shot in the speaker world.

[00:00:41] And she's the first speaker on record to have spoken on all seven continents and in all 50 states. And check this out. David Hasselhoff of Baywatch fame owes his entire career to her. So she'll tell you about that later. So hope you didn't miss episode 301, it's one of my Monday training sessions on self-reliance. Now, this is me railing against the concept of delegation and how this concept, if misused, can kill your business right from the start. So check that out when you can, if you missed it. How would you like to hear your own voice here on screw the commute. Well, if the show's helped you out in your business in any way or you got ideas to help you start a business. We want to hear about it. So go to screwthecommute.com and look for a little blue side bar that says send voicemail. You can click on it, talk right into your phone or computer and tell me how the show has helped you out. Make sure you put your Web site in there and you'll get a big shout out in front of thousands of people on a future episode of Screw the Commute in your own voice. So check that out. Also, make sure you grab a copy of our automation e-book. This e-book.

[00:01:53] We figured it out about two years ago that just one of the tips in this e-book has saved me seven and a half million keystrokes. And this is not exaggeration.

[00:02:04] And the whole book has saved me all kinds of stuff, allowed me to handle 150000 subscribers and 40000 customers without pulling my hair out, allows me to steal business from other people who are too darn slow to get back to you. So check that out at screwthecommute.com/automatefree.

[00:02:25] We charge 27 bucks for this book, but it's years free for listening to the show and also pick up a copy of our podcast app while you're at it. It's screwthecommute.com/app. And we've got the instructions and video and screen captures on how to use all the fancy features so you can take us with you on the road. Now, we're kind of in this pandemic and everybody is working from home nowadays. And people that knew me 20 years ago are calling me up and say, boy, I wish I had to listen to you 20 years ago.

[00:02:58] Yeah, I bet you do. And I formalized my training in this lifestyle business that I have been living for 26 years since the commercial Internet started in two, the only licensed, dedicated Internet marketing school in the country. It's IMTCVA.org. All the stuff we have and Barbara's stuff will also be in the show notes for this episode and you can learn the nuts and bolts skills it takes to really, really have an in demand career. I mean, I'm really upset with the the traditional colleges and universities that are just raising the fees, teaching you how to protest. And you're you've got all this debt and you're competing for jobs at Starbucks. Well, that I don't roll that way. We have students in a couple months making more money than they ever made in their life before they even graduated. So check it out at IMTCVA.org. It's a great legacy gift for your children, your grandchildren, your nephews and nieces to give them a solid career that's in high demand.

[00:04:04] All right. Let's get to the main event. Barbara Glanz is here and she works with organizations to improve morale, retention and service. And she's known for her inspiring presentations on employee engagement, customer service, appreciation and recognition. And boy, we need a lot of this lately. Kindness. She's the author of 13 books, including The Simple Truth of Service. Now, she has a whole series on care packages for the workplace. And I did a care speaker's tour one time. It was the worst thing I ever did in my life should have read her book first before I did it, and 180 ways to Spread Contagious Enthusiasm. And she was voted the best keynote presenter you have ever heard by Meetings and Conventions magazine. Boy, she lives and breathes her personal motto, spreading contagious enthusiasm.

[00:05:00] Barbara, are you ready to screw? The commute?

[00:05:05] Oh, my Gosh Tom, you're amazing.

[00:05:11] No, it's been a long time since we caught up with each other.

[00:05:14] It has been, and it's such a joy. I'm so excited to be a part of your your whole series.

[00:05:20] So tell everybody what you're doing now. And then we'll take you back. Now, you have to promise not to force me to take piano lessons four or five years. I know you've got a slave driver. I have. Well, my parents made me take violin lessons. I took violin with the toes. What you're doing now and I understand you moved to Florida now and then we'll take you back to see how you came up through the ranks. I know you got a lot of tips for success.

[00:05:50] All right. Well, yes, I moved from the Chicago area to Sarasota, Florida. This was after my husband died. So I kind of needed a new beginning.

[00:05:59] No, you needed somebody that needed a place where there's no show snow to shovel during this pandemic.

[00:06:06] I say every day. Thank you, God. I live on the beach. I can walk five miles on the beach or swim a mile in our pool. And I am grateful every day. That's what's kept me sane. You asked what I'm doing. I attempted my first virtual keynote. Last week it went well, but I missed all the energy right. I am basically a keynote speaker, although my my master's degree is in adult learning. So I come from a very strong training background. I was manager of training and director of quality and training for a Times Mirror company from 1988 to nineteen ninety five. And then in ninety five started my own company. I realized I could impact so many more people. And by the way, I have a great story for young people because I was a high school and college English teacher and actually that's where David Hasselhoff comes in. I was a drama teacher as well. I directed him at his first high school play.

[00:07:15] I told Jessie his third is Don't give me credit for his career with a terrible actor. The entities still is. But he's cute and a really nice guy.

[00:07:28] So that was a wonderful part of my background. But then I chose to stay home when I had children. So I stayed home for almost 19 years and I did a lot of part time things. I finished my masters, as I said, in adult learning. I did a lot of teaching of English as a second language for the government and and just kind of kept my finger in. And then I went back as a person speaker for the grammar group in Chicago. And that was fun because that brought in all my English background. But then when I was asked to be manager training and time, it was that the company was special. They specialized in customer service and all aspects of that. So I grew their training staff from eleven to 60. I helped write a number of their programs. I trained master trainers and I love that. However, as I said, I was working with smaller groups of people and as I started speaking at their conferences and then clients had me speak at their conferences, I realized I could do so much more. And at that point, everybody in that company was concentrating on the external customer. And my belief became that until we really focus as well on the internal customer, we're not going to have a culture that really serves others. So I started speaking on employee engagement, regenerating spirit in the workplace. And I have to tell you a fun story about that.

[00:09:12] I was very new. Nobody was talking about, like spirit in the workplace, not not religious spirit, but just very engaged employees in spirit of caring and creativity and fun and ultimately productivity. So I had been speaking at an SDD American Society for Training and Development conference, and I was in the ladies room and I don't know about in the guys room, but in the lady, people do a lot of talking. And so as I was putting on makeup, one of the people next to me said, what do you speak about? And I said, regenerating spirit in the workplace. And she said, well, my boss would love to talk to you about that. I'm going to try to set up a lunch. What's your room number? And I told her and it just kind of thinking probably nothing would come of it, but. Got home that night late to the hotel room and there was a message from this woman saying, can you meet us for lunch at such and such a restaurant at eleven thirty? Now, she didn't tell me who her boss was, but I figured anybody that was interested in my passion, I wanted to meet. So I walked in and her boss was Ken Blanchard. Oh, worse. You know, his book, The One Minute Manager is the best selling misses of all time. So I was a bit overwhelmed, but talked and talked and talked. And in that conversation, I told him this story of Johnny the Bagger. And that story has been one of the most amazing things to happen in my career. But anyway, he had tears rolling down from this story. And it's about how one person that heard me speak turned a whole organization upside down. And they've made two movies of it and five million people have watched one of them on YouTube. And then as a result, Ken and I did a book together that sold about 750 copies. Anyway, I started Shati said, I'm closing the conference of 15000 people, 150 copies or seven or 50000 thousand.

[00:11:21] Yeah, it's 50, I figure.

[00:11:23] Oh, I. Oh, is it. Yes. It hasn't. Maybe a lot of money because we don't get a very big railroad.

[00:11:31] Ok, I'm here to serve. And that was, that was the most important thing. But anyway, we did e close this conference and he said, could I share this story if I credit you? And of course he did. And everybody in the audience was touched. And that's become a beautiful friendship and many things. What are the things that I would say to everybody is how important networking is and how important it is to connect with other people who have the same passion that you do. And even when I wrote my very first book, I decided that I would handwrite all of my heroes and I was nobody, of course, and asked them if they would would be willing to look at my book. And one of my friends and I wrote to augment Dino and Tom Cruise. And kind of course, a number of people in one of my friends said, how can you have the nerve to do that? And I said, well, they're just people. And all they have to do is say yes or no. And I got a fax that day from Ogami and Dino saying, this is the best book on communication I've ever read. And I just cried. Right. Wonderful hero. Anyway, I'm getting off track now.

[00:12:50] That's a good point for everybody here is don't be afraid to contact people when you do that. You did it. The handwriting too. They never see that anymore.

[00:12:58] That's right. That's right. And if you you know and I sent them a little something, of course, afterwards, but I've always believed if you aim for the top, you never know. All they can do is say say no. And you go a little a little lower. But, you know, again, if you believe in what you're saying and what you're doing and that's so evident with you, Tom.

[00:13:20] Oh, my gosh, I do. Well, but, you know, there's two two things I picked up. So for besides the shoot for the high end, as you said, you taught English as a second language, right?

[00:13:32] Yes. Yes. So I think you should teach government as a second because you said you did it for the government.

[00:13:40] I sit here all day with the TV on, like, what are you folks doing in there?

[00:13:44] I do see many of the other tip is, as you said, about your kind of kibbutz's with somebody in a ladies bathroom that doesn't really work in the in the men's room.

[00:13:59] Ever say, oh, what a nice hairdo.

[00:14:04] So we might have to switch to go into the ladies bathroom to use that tip, but we didn't get thrown out. So take us back. Do you remember when you actually started a business, your first business?

[00:14:17] Yes. Oh, yes, I did. I do. It was in nineteen ninety five. And the interesting thing was that I had spoken for EGD. I mentioned that to you. And I had never even done a proposal before, but I had gone several times that I thought I can do better than most people.

[00:14:39] So I found out later is kind of unheard of to get accepted the first time. But I was the last speaker on the last day of a five day conference. Wow. And I thought, nobody is great.

[00:14:52] Well, I had standing room only and out of that session I got a call from a gentleman who is personnel director in the state of Michigan, and he said, I want to have you come. And train people in the state of Michigan in customer service, and that ended up the first month of my business to be a five year. Two hundred and fifty thousand dollar contract.

[00:15:17] That was everybody like that.

[00:15:21] But, you know, that is my second tip is B would be check out all the conferences and associations if you are a speaker or trainer. Check those out. And again, that's a networking opportunity and apply to speak. And even, you know, in your industry, if you're a leader in your industry, apply to speak because it's wonderful networking and you never know what will come from that. So that was one of the first things. That was just the affirmation that I I'd done the right thing because it was scary. My husband was older. He was getting ready to retire, and we had two girls in college. So my check, my paycheck was important. So it was a big risk.

[00:16:09] Did you operate as a sole proprietor? I did emperors. So at the beginning I was the sole proprietor.

[00:16:15] But my other tip is to get your family involved because that gives you that support system. So when you have to work later, you have to travel or all those things. If your family's involved, they're much more appreciative and have a lot more patience with you. So my daughter kept the books. One of my daughters, another daughter did all my PowerPoint. My husband did some marketing for me. And he also traveled with me. And he would get up in the morning and check all the equipment, line up around the room and then bring me breakfast.

[00:16:54] So all I do is look good.

[00:16:58] But it was it was a wonderful blessing to have them. And the other thing is, I think for me, the main reason that I've been so successful Tom is I've come from a foundation of faith and service. And when I started my company, I just said, God, you gave me this gift. So this is your company and you put me where you want me to be.

[00:17:22] And I really have done almost no marketing. It's been all word of mouth and referral. And I think because and, you know, I grew up in a town of forty five hundred in Iowa. So never even in my wildest dreams did I dream I could speak on every continent.

[00:17:42] I just spoke in my 100th country. You know, I am so grateful every day. But there's a wonderful quote from from Albert Schweitzer's that says one thing that we will know one thing. Let me read it to you exactly. One thing I know, the only ones among you who will be truly happy are those who have sought and found how to serve.

[00:18:06] And so if I think when you come from a foundation of service, not in it for yourself, kin's definite. Kim Blanchard's definition of ego is edging God out.

[00:18:20] And I love that because when you're not coming from a place of self, you're coming from a place of wanting to help people using the gifts that you've been given, the passion that I think is deep within us, you know, then it's not a job. You know, it's when I speak to an organization, I ask people, what is your work? And they always tell me a job. Tytler job description. And I say to all of them, you know what? We are all so much more than a job title or a job description. So when I ask what is your work, what I want to know is this how is what you do every day making somebody's life better?

[00:19:08] That's her work. And that's way different from a job.

[00:19:15] And so I don't care if you empty bedpans or you take out the garbage or you run a whole company. Think about how is what you do baking somebodies life better and that if you focus on that as your purpose. And again, people, I think today are desperate to have a purpose, especially when you're at home, you know, with your kids around or your dog or, you know, all this stuff that you see that needs to be done around you and you're trying hard to work in front of your computer. Having that sense of purpose or mission that you are doing something to make a difference is just critically important.

[00:19:56] Yeah. And people I'm kind of that way with from a different angle on it.

[00:20:01] The people ask me all the time, well, what faith are you? What religion are you? And, you know, I'm always gonna give my goofball answers. So so I say, I'm Poseidon.

[00:20:11] And they're like, what? I said, Poseidon. You remember, Barbara, the movie The Poseidon Adventure. Of course. Of course.

[00:20:19] The original one was with Shelley Winters and Gene Hackman. And yet and Gene and I was much younger at the time when I came out. And Gene Hackman was a preacher and he was doing a sermon on deck and he said, you know what? You take what you got and use it to do good for people.

[00:20:38] And I'm thinking, man, you can't go too far wrong with that idea. And that's kind of what I just lived the whole time. So I'm Poseidon, if anybody asks.

[00:20:46] That's great. I love that. And, you know, and it's a gift.

[00:20:50] You know, we work hard. We work hard. But we are. We are gifted.

[00:20:55] We work 60 hours a week to get out of work and 40 for somebody else. Her hours, if that is right. So you've got some other tips, right?

[00:21:05] I do what I do. NSA.

[00:21:07] So National Speakers Association folks there, the National Security Agency.

[00:21:12] That's right.

[00:21:13] Yeah. Early on in my career. So I would say to people, find the organization or a one or two that are where your industry leaders go enjoy and become active in those groups writing my writing books.

[00:21:30] You know, that's probably my best marketing tool. And I have I have a proclivity here. I truly like to publish. If I can, with a mainstream publisher. And I know I'm different from a lot of people in that, but at least early on in my career, there was a lot more credibility with me. Right. Right. And you get paid instead of you paying them when you self publish. But, of course, you make a lot more money with his self published book. So, you know, it's a conundrum. But I. I am grateful that I've had all my books. I've worked with five different publishers. And to get your books out there is one of the ways that that you touch people that you don't have even any idea about. My my idea of heaven is that we'll see all the people we've touched that we know nothing about.

[00:22:26] There you go now. Now, a lot of people sitting out there saying, well, yeah, you were an English teacher at all, is that right? I know people that are semi literate, that have written 14 bestsellers. Absolutely. There's no there's no time like I mean, if you have an idea, good ideas that help people. There's people that will get it down and get it into a book form for you.

[00:22:48] And there are lots of ways. Absolutely. Absolutely. And you know that the written word. Laughs. I mean, that's what I did my first book. One of my friends called and said, now you're immortal.

[00:23:00] You're in Library of Congress. You're all pretty cool to think about. So so a legacy of that.

[00:23:08] We were talking about monuments. I think they're going to build a monument to you pretty soon because many people have spoken in all the continents and all the states and everything. So that deserves a monument, I think.

[00:23:20] Well, it's not about me job.

[00:23:23] And we're going to make an extra call so they can't pull out, like you said.

[00:23:28] Well, I and another thing I would suggest to people is, is collecting, you know, whatever your passion is, start collecting what? I write a book. I get a milk crate and I pace the working title on the milk crate. And then sometimes for two years, I just put things in, write notes on napkins and tear articles out at the doctor's office. You know, I just keep collecting for that book.

[00:23:55] And when I actually start writing, I think our subconscious mind, once we make that commitment to this subject and the title, I think our subconscious mind just works on that book the whole time.

[00:24:08] Absolutely, Barbara. I'm listening to this. I'm saying that's the same thing that I was I was getting accused of being a hoarder and I was collecting magazines and newspapers and everything. And it turned out into my waking my business presentations book. It's been selling since the early 90s. And also the part about taking time to write the book. Now, I have written a book in four hours that's made three point six million dollars. So I'm OK for that, too. But. But the thing is, is it's hard for you to sit down and just think of everything you know about a subject that just sit down and write it down.

[00:24:44] So I nowadays I use my phone. But I mean, in the old days, I use a mini cassette recorder and I would just carry it around with me. And as soon as I would think of something that should be in the book, I would, you know, just make a little mental note of it in my recorder and then I'd transcribe it because things will trigger your mind about stories and things that you forgot about years ago. And so that's. So I do both methods. I collect stuff and then I just brew on it and make little mini recordings.

[00:25:16] You know, that's a great idea. I'm much more of a visual person, so I really need to do it in writing. And, you know, see things. But you've always been I mean, you were the first Internet guru. And that's how I've thought about your. The first Internet guru in the NSA. And that I know. And so you've used that technology in ways most of us have not.

[00:25:40] Well, the reason I like is because, I mean, if you're driving, you can't stop and write something down, but you can pick your recorder up, hit the button and it reminds you of it. So go ahead with some more tips we love in this.

[00:25:52] Well, the nice thing about when you do that collecting and again, I think our subconscious mind just works, works. I spread it out all over my living room floor and it's amazing. It just falls into chapters, you know? And again, I think that's what's been going on in my head. So I write a book pretty quickly.

[00:26:15] You must not have a dog. No, I don't get to say that. That's it.

[00:26:22] But I also think that and I have to be very focused. I mean, when I write a book, I probably spend two or three weeks not getting dressed. You know, I'll get to the computer in my nightgown in the morning. And at night I take a shower and change it because, I mean, I'm very focused when I do what I do that. But everybody has different styles.

[00:26:43] So I would just say to you, you know, it pick a topic of something that you are passionate about, because if you don't really care about it, it's not that's not going to come through. It's not going to help a lot of people. And so I don't think that, you know, it can be anything. It can be any one of my books is called What Can I Do? Ideas to help people who've experienced a loss. It's it wasn't my topic area. But we had a child who died and my husband died at a young age of cancer. And so many people said to me, what can I do? And I either didn't know or I didn't have the courage to ask. So for four years, after all of that, I ask people all over the world, what did when you've had a loss, it could be divorce or loss of a job, loss of health. Usually it was death. But what did someone do that meant a lot to you? And then what do you wish someone had done?

[00:27:47] And so the whole book is a compilation of ideas so that people can pick it up and look through and find something that is comfortable for them to help somebody else.

[00:27:57] And that's a great way to write a book. You compile a bunch of stuff in one place. You're basically the publisher and writer. That's hey, you know, who's had the biggest influence on me and all my products? And I have. Who's that? The late Dan Poynter.

[00:28:14] Oh, yes. Yes.

[00:28:16] Self publishing. Now, American forces. Like ninety two versions of zero.

[00:28:22] He wrote what I think every year and I have had his first version and I started, I don't know, twenty five, twenty six years ago, certain writing. And I've only had one major publisher book that told the opposite of you. And it was the worst experience.

[00:28:38] Oh yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

[00:28:41] I hated it. I mean, think about this. I mean with your books are more evergreen. Like what I wrote. By the time I turned in the manuscript on an on a data book, it was 18 months before it hit the towers.

[00:28:55] And and of course, I had written it for six, seven months before that. So who's two years old? An Internet book. And then they nickeled and dimed me to death on indexing the book. And I had to pay for the graphics of. And now it's even worse. A lot of times they make you guarantee so many sales and so I'm happy to self publish.

[00:29:14] Absolutely. And your topic, you know, lends itself to be fair.

[00:29:20] Now, there's not that stigma of self publishing. I mean, it writers years ago there was because anybody could publish anything.

[00:29:27] And a lot of it is really bad right now. Now there is not. There's still a lot of it. Really great it to publish stuff that's really bad.

[00:29:39] Ok, so another tip for you, for everybody is to be creative. Get out of the box. And you're the perfect example. They've heard that, I'm sure, from you for a long time. But from the time I was really young, I never did anything the way everybody else did it. And when I had a book report at school, I didn't just do a book report. I would make a food that went with that report and pass it out, or I would make a bottle or I dress in a costume, you know, and always from from that day on, I've tried to do something different. And so when I talk about spreading creative enthusiasm and by the way, one of the things I love with my personal motto is that the root word of it we see as the root words are in the US over from God.

[00:30:33] So any enthusiasm comes from something bigger than any of us. And so getting creative about that and a lot of my books are chroot creative ideas of things that people have done, organizations have done to create a positive environment to appreciate people. And I'm very also very focused on very simple practical ideas and models, because I think everybody today is overwhelmed, you know, overwhelmed with communication, overwhelmed with the news, overwhelmed with all the resources available to them. And so, you know, our brains are kind of fried. So, you know, I use in my work, I use some very simple models and I would encourage people to begin to think like that with whatever their passion may be. So when I talk about appreciation and customer service and aboy engagement, I use a very simple model with three columns. There's a minus column, a zero column and a plus column. And down below it says your choice in every interaction. So every interaction you have, you can discount that other person, make them feel less important than you or your organization. That's a that's a minus. If you just do the business at hand, it's really a zero. And I call these people's slot fillers, they come in and they do just enough to get by. The clock strikes, they're out the door. But every time you make a human level connection and you say to that person, I see you. You are a value. You are important.

[00:32:27] You make a difference. And I have some wonderful little stories about that, that, you know, it just everybody gets it. OK.

[00:32:36] So I went into the washroom at O'Hare Airport, rose cold, snowy February morning, and there was a woman there who was cleaning and she was just all hunched over and just kind of going through the motions. So I walked up and touched her on the arm. I looked her right in the eyes. I said, thank you so much for keeping this restroom clean. You're really making a difference for all of us who travel. She just perked up as she started cleaning with a passion. By the time I got ready to go, she was handing towels out to all the women who were washing their hands.

[00:33:15] I left with tears in my eyes. It was me. Nothing. Right. Right. But that for I.

[00:33:21] I don't think anybody here is that Tom. And they don't get it.

[00:33:27] That they have a choice. And it's little things. It's now big thing.

[00:33:33] It's a beautiful model. Yeah. Minus zero or Plus's day on the plus side. Your life is gonna be better. And so's everybody else's.

[00:33:41] Absolutely. And I just tell him I want you to leave with it tattooed in your brain.

[00:33:47] All right. We've got to take a brief sponsor break. When we come back, we'll ask Barbara what a typical day looks like for her. Here about where we can find her books and then all that stuff. So. So, folks, about 20 years ago, it kind of turned the Internet marketing guru world on its head. Guys at my level were charging 50 or 100 grand upfront to help you and teach you this stuff. And I know a lot of these guys, you give them 50 grand. You'll be chasing them around Mexico trying to find us. So so I said, you know, it's too much risk for small business and it's not fair. And so I charged about 10 percent of that as a entry fee. And then I tied myself to their success. So for me to get my big money, they had to make big money.

[00:34:30] And people seemed to like that idea because they knew I wouldn't disappear on them. So 20 years later. And seventeen hundred students. It's been going strong still. So. So we have a one on one program. So very unique. It's the longest running, most successful ever Internet marketing mentor program in that I don't believe in group training for this kind of stuff. We tried it once and it was a disaster because the people that were beginners were lost. When I was talking to the advanced people and the advanced people were bored to death when I was talking to the beginners. So I said, this is not right. Nobody's getting what they need. So my whole organization through this mentor program is available one on one on an unlimited basis, too, to tutor you, to make these things happen, to get you this kind of lifestyle business I've been enjoying for 26 years since the commercial Internet started. So you can check out the details at greatInternetmarketingtraining.com. And it also includes a scholarship to my school, which you can use yourself or gift to somebody. So one guy gifted it to his daughter, who he had spent eighty thousand dollars on her education, and she's working some crap job within one month. She was making eleven hundred dollars on the side. Two months later, three thousand four months later, four months total. Since the start of the school, she's making six thousand dollars a month as a side hustle. Quit her other job. She still hasn't graduated yet. So that's the kind of power because every every business on earth needs this skill, but they're all clueless. So they were happy to throw money at her to take over their social media and run their shopping carts and do. That's the forum.

[00:36:16] So it's a very in demand skill and you won't be in debt the rest of your life. So check it out through my mentor program at greatInternetmarketingtraining.com.

[00:36:27] Ok. We're back with the fantastic Barbara Glanz.

[00:36:30] What a dynamo of a woman when you see her Web site go to her extended bio. The things she's done. I mean, I kind of relate because when you screw the commute, you can live two or three lives. I think she's lived about eight of them and all the things she's done.

[00:36:45] So. So what's a typical day look like for you, Barbara?

[00:36:49] Well, I think I need to sign up for your program. Well, I have my typical day now is not at all like my typical day was about eight or nine weeks ago.

[00:37:03] So I am I'm kind of enjoying the same lifestyle that you are. Oh, it's it's really nice. I've gotten so many projects done, probably throughout 20 crates of paper, things I had saved over the years and gave a lot of my business books to the speaker's chapter. So that's been a wonderful use of that time at home. But I'm getting ready to you know, after traveling all the time, I'm really missing the travel, so.

[00:37:33] Oh, you you are. I haven't been on a plane in two and a half years about death.

[00:37:38] I don't know how you do that.

[00:37:40] I just love the people and the experiences and the cultures and the food. For me, it's just, you know, a very growing wonderful experience.

[00:37:52] I make them come to me overseas. So we have the retreat center here where people actually live in the house for an immersion weekend. Oh, yeah.

[00:38:01] So it's pretty cool. And then I have my kind of infamous but camp where, you know, who is the it's the longest running Internet marketing seminar because I came from a comic background and everybody wanted me to do a bootcamp. And I said, I can't do boot camp. You know, I'm sitting here on my rear and making all this money, I'll call it.

[00:38:20] But camp, it's hard, as I remember to remember, that, you know, flip the ship was there like the world record like eight times because you come once. You come. Forever for free.

[00:38:32] She'd always bring a young person with her to implement the stuff. But she was smart enough to know that she needed as the principal to know the big picture and then implement it with young people to make it make it happen. Now they only think different. Your world traveler. They made me call it bump camp in England.

[00:38:51] That's why I love it. Yeah.

[00:38:53] So anyway, I've done a lot of stuff on Doob, of course, and it's got to go there today.

[00:39:00] You say you swim a mile or you walk the beach and you were a swimming instructor for a long time.

[00:39:06] I was. I was. And you know, that is my I don't like to sweat. So that's my exercise of choice.

[00:39:13] Good.

[00:39:14] It's one hundred and two lengths in my pool. And it's a, you know, pool with the association. But it was wonderful this this winter because there was nobody here. Right? Oh, I love that. But yeah, I, I do at least 30 minutes to an hour of some exercise every day. That's really important to me. I do a very healthy smoothie every morning and I love to have to write notes. So I write everyday, I write two or three notes to somebody that needs some encouragement. And I do have three books in process, though. Tom some I have some things, you know, seriously going.

[00:39:56] And then I just kind of waiting to see what's going to happen with this whole pandemic in with the actual live presentation.

[00:40:07] I think they're coming back because there's no substitute for no matter how good you get on Zoome unless they start making holograms out of you. You know, this is no substitute for no. You just invite people over to sit in your living room while you're doing your zumthor.

[00:40:24] Well, I do have one neat project coming up with virtual reality and that excited about there is a very large nonprofit who has hired a company here in Sarasota that is known worldwide for their skill at virtual reality. And they want to train all of their employees in customer service. And they the folks at the virtual reality company called and said, we have the technology, but you have the knowledge. Will you be our subject matter expert on this project? So I'm excited about that because I think that's gonna be really fun to learn about.

[00:40:59] That's cool. Yeah, I was going to start a virtual reality bank and give you all your money all the way you guys like.

[00:41:11] So anyway, you know, I am I am loving this time to regroup and reconnect. I've been reconnecting with a lot of people that I haven't seen for like me. Yes, exactly like you. I was so delighted to get your email invitation. So this is this has been delightful.

[00:41:31] So tell me about your books. Where can they find your stuff? And if they need the best keynote speaker ever on Earth?

[00:41:39] Tell them how to find. What are the things? I'm very up that deck. I am the same person on the platform as I am with you today. Yeah. Everything is from the inside out. And I have just again, a real passion for helping people. So my Web site, BarbaraGlanz.com. I'm not glands like adrenaline and thyroid, and my books are all available there. My videos are they're way more than you would ever want. And then my email is Bglanz@BarbaraGlanz.com or by phone number 941-312-9169. And I give my home phone number to every audience in the world Tom. And I've had. I want to mention. Yeah. I mean, people are so afraid of giving out their number. And I think, you know, that's that's sad because we need to come from a place of trust.

[00:42:44] So so if they want if they want to get a date with that Hasselhoff guy, they go through, you know.

[00:42:52] This is interesting. I was speaking in Las Vegas. This is about four years ago. I got off the plane and there were the big billboards. It said David Hasselhoff starring in The Producers. So when I got to the hotel, I called the coast here and I said, could you get me a ticket for Tuesday night and could you get a message to David? That is all drama teacher is going to be in the eye. And she said, I don't know, but I'll try. And the next day, his assistant calls it, David's dying to see you. He'll send you a backstage pass. And we talked for about an hour. I knew his parents and his sister.

[00:43:27] Oh, that's wonderful.

[00:43:29] Oh, was. It was fine.

[00:43:30] But I don't know about a day I got to tell you a quick story about one of my students was the concierge in Las Vegas at the Paris Hotel.

[00:43:42] And she wrote a book called You Want What?

[00:43:46] What, Ray?

[00:43:47] It is hysterical. She had this one guy. This one guy came up and said he wanted a virgin chicken. And so she's calling the the the the chefs. Do you know what a virgin chicken is? No, we don't. She's calling all over all the hotels. Virgin. She's got once a virgin chicken and she finally, you know, and it's kind of embarrassing for them not being able to come through. Right. She finally admits to the guy that she just cannot find a virgin chicken in Las Vegas. And he was the Scottish guy and he wanted the Virgin Airlines check in.

[00:44:27] She's the author of The Virgin Chicken. Oh, my God.

[00:44:32] And then this other time, these guys are having a bachelor party. And so they gave this blow up doll. They were supposed to put in the guy's room. And so they gave it to the manager and he said, I'm not blowing this up. So he blows it up with helium and puts it under the covers in the room. And then he gets called to the manager's office and the ambulance shows up. Some one of the maids went in and went to pull the covers back and his body floated off. So the whole book is hysterical with stories like that.

[00:45:09] Great. A great example for your art. Exactly.

[00:45:13] And, you know, one other quick story that I just love about the importance of our books and how we leave that that kind of a legacy. This was several years ago, I bet out on the road three weeks.

[00:45:25] I was totally. And I'd come home about 1:00 in the morning. I was absolutely exhausted. And I come home to a dark, empty condo. And I'd missed what I'd forgotten to call my daughter on her birthday. I'd missed something else. It was important. It was just in tears. I thought, oh, Lord, what am I doing with my life? And I was so hepped up at that point, I couldn't sleep. So I had a great big stack of mail and I decided I'll just go through my mail. And in this stack there was a padded envelope with a book and I opened it and I looked at this book and the author. I thought, why am I getting this book? I don't even know who this person is. And I opened the book. It was dedicated to me. And there was a note saying, I heard you speak ten years ago and you were the encourager that allowed me to finish this book.

[00:46:23] That's beautiful. And I really balls. Yeah. Yeah. What about a fast answer from above.

[00:46:32] Was so good catching up with you, Barbara. So I know everybody is going to want to check out your books.

[00:46:37] And hopefully if somebody is in some companies out there, they they know who to call when they want to. Top of the line on a keynote speakers. So. So thanks so much for coming on.

[00:46:49] You're welcome. And God bless all of you in the audience. I send you peace and love and safety.

[00:46:54] Perfect. All right. We'll catch everybody on the next episode. And you need that safety if you hang around me. All right. Catch ya later.

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