Home > NewsRelease > 207 – Customer service speaking at its finest: Tom interviews Barbara Khozam
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207 – Customer service speaking at its finest: Tom interviews Barbara Khozam
From:
Tom Antion -- Internet Marketing Expert Tom Antion -- Internet Marketing Expert
For Immediate Release:
Dateline: Virginia Beach , VA
Friday, November 15, 2019

 

Episode 207 – Barbara Khozam
[00:00:09] Welcome to Screw the Commute. The entrepreneurial podcast dedicated to getting you out of the car and into the money, with your host, lifelong entrepreneur and multimillionaire, Tom Antion.

[00:00:24] Hey, everybody, it's Tom's here with episode 207 of Screw the Commute podcast. I'm here with Barbara Khozam and she just spent two days here shooting fantastic videos for her YouTube channel and Web site. And she's back with us today to talk about her international customer service business. I hope you didn't miss Episode 206. That was Adam Katz. This guy won't let anything, including pain stop him. Wait till you hear his inspiring story. He's got 30 books to his credit and a fantastic and proven Google ad agency, all while suffering debilitating migraines his entire life. He's a perfect example of how to create a lifestyle based business around your limitations. And my limitations today is I'm under the weather, but the show must go on. So if you hear any roughness in my voice, that's the breaks. I'm going to make this happen for it because we don't want to miss Barbara. All right. Quick announcement, our podcast app's in the App Store. All you have to do is go to screwthecommute.com/app and you can download it there. And it does all kinds of cool stuff. When you take us with you on the road, make sure you get a copy of our e-book. It's a freebie for the. Thank you for listening to this podcast. That's how to automate your business. Just one of the tips in this book has saved me over seven and a half million keystrokes and allowed me to handle up two hundred and fifty thousand subscribers and forty thousand customers without pulling my hair out. So we sell it for twenty seven bucks, but it's year free as my. Thanks for listening. And when you're over to download page and this is by the way it screwthecommute.com/automatefree. Grab yourself another little white paper I have there that some people are charging four five and six thousand dollars teaching you how to do high quality podcasts. Our sponsor's the Internet Marketing Training Center Virginia is a distance learning school which teaches legitimate techniques to make a great living, either working for someone else or starting your own online business or both. You can check it out at IMTCVA.org.

[00:02:53] All right. Let's get to the main event. Barbara Khozam is an award winning international motivational speaker and trainer specializing in customer service and the patient experience. In 2019, Barbara was awarded the CSP that's a certified speaking professional from the prestigious National Speakers Association. Barbara is one of only three women in the entire world. You know, I'll say the universe to have achieved this designation. She put designation destination as well as the toastmaster accredited speaker designation. Only three people in the world have that. Barbara, are you ready to screw. The commute?

[00:03:41] Yes, I am ready.

[00:03:43] Wake up over there. California people are asleep on me.

[00:03:47] I know, shhhh.

[00:03:49] So tell everybody what you're doing now. I'm going to hack my throat up here while I'm listening to you. And tell him tell him what you're doing now. And then we're going to take you back and see how you came up through the ranks, including this lady was a professional volleyball player. Is that cool? All right. So tell me what you're doing now.

[00:04:10] OK. So right now what I'm doing and what brings me joy to to the world is that I'm working with a lot of doctors offices, a lot of midsize medical groups on helping them raise patient satisfaction survey results. And I mainly do that through training. I do that. I help them create customer service protocols. I do mystery patient because I'm a professional mystery patient. I've taken taking my clothes off a lot of people anyway.

[00:04:47] And my costs are good and very, very expensive.

[00:04:54] So it's cool is that I get to go in and do the training. I work with the leadership team, help them hold people accountable, and then we see results. So it's pretty cool all around. It's a win win win.

[00:05:06] My mind has gone all kinds of places, like if I if I was ready mystery shoppers and go on to go on to get your prostate check. There's a lot of. That's really sacrificing for your business. Right. You're going to gynecologist.

[00:05:20] That's sure. Sure.

[00:05:22] Yeah. I guess I would have trouble doing that when you have to turn that job down or farm it out. I guess if I if I got a mystery shopper at the gynecologist.

[00:05:32] Good point. Good point. So. So is it really any kind of medical facility?

[00:05:41] Yeah, I've been working with all sorts of doctors and now recently dentists. I've been working with dentists as well. So anyone really in the health care profession has been a good a good source of joy for me.

[00:05:55] Well, seriously, though. I mean, how far do you have to go before, you know, you actually have to get your teeth drilled or what I mean, or is it only on the phone to see how they act on the phone or what? What's the mystery shopper entail in the medical field?

[00:06:11] Yes. So I actually do both. I do mystery calls. I actually have a team of mystery callers that will call. They can do it a lot better than I can because I travel so much. So they call different times a day with different scenarios. And they're really good liars. So they're really good at it. I'm really not very good at lying anyway. And then the mystery patient visit for the dentist is kind of basic.

[00:06:38] Sometimes my people will go in and do a cleaning, but sometimes I'll just go in and say, you know, I've got some pain in this area. Can you take a look?

[00:06:48] Or, you know, so it's really not to assess the the doctors. And like how they how they give me a diagnosis.

[00:06:58] It's today it's to analyze the patient visit from the moment I call to the moment I leave the office, whether it's a dentist or a doctor. So I can analyze the call people, the front desk, the Emmys and the high Genest, the whole process from start to finish.

[00:07:16] Well, that they ask you like, well, how about shipping your records over here from the last dentist? And then you say, well, I got the 42 dentures.

[00:07:25] They have the.

[00:07:30] Oh, yeah. Yeah. So there's a lot of lying that goes on there. So I'll say, oh, gosh, you know, shoot, I just moved and I forgot my like, I forgot my license or. But a lot a lot of times the office manager can help me get into the system so they kind of can set me up as a patient already, sort of. So, you know, I need a little bit of help of getting in and around the system.

[00:07:57] If the manager sucks and the dentist wants to check up on the manager.

[00:08:05] Yes. So I can say. Well, usually that's a good point. So I can still I can figure it out.

[00:08:14] Yeah. I mean, you know, the dentist would have to do the dirty work. Exactly. Now, what if the manager wants to check up on the dentist? Yep. Yep, yep, yep. That happens. That happens.

[00:08:26] So it's the same kind of thing they get me like I just was in Bermuda. One of my clients is in Bermuda.

[00:08:32] And so I got dentists in Bermuda. They have lot of on top. Oh, my gosh.

[00:08:38] There's so many. I can't even believe it. So, yeah, I had I did the same thing. I she had me come in and observe this, her front desk staff and the dentist. So it was the same thing. It was.

[00:08:50] Who paid for them is to be checked up on them, so.

[00:08:54] Oh well they kind of write it off, you know. I don't know how they write those kinds of things, but. Yeah.

[00:09:01] So that's cool. So. So any crazy experiences you've ever had during one of these mystery shop?

[00:09:10] Yeah, nothing. Nothing. Nothing dangerous stand and like nothing horrible, but just a lot of minor stuff like I was doing. I was visiting a hand. It was a hand, doctor. I guess it was it was a hand doctor. And like just little things like the doctor. Look at me. He sits down. What can I do? You know, he says, what can I do for you? Like, it was just nothing like a super awful but just enough to make me not happy with the visit. And that seems to be the trend. Well, it's not awful, but it's just so icky. You know, there's no connection. Like, they don't care. Yeah, that makes me not want to come back.

[00:09:54] Yeah, it's. But I'm just thinking, if they got their records mixed up, mixed up and they they all of a sudden got a record for, oh, this lady is really nervous. So you have to kind of sneak up on her and hit a rhythm sedative.

[00:10:10] No. Yeah. No tolerance. It's not like that.

[00:10:14] There's a good there's a good skit with Tim Conway and the dentist office that's famous where this kind of stuff he keeps, you know, shootin novacaine in the different parts of his body.

[00:10:26] So. Yeah. Check that out. Right. So. So did you ever have a job? Oh, my gosh.

[00:10:34] Oh, way back in those the Jay River job.

[00:10:37] Oh, yes, of course I had it's up, so I out of. I graduated from college with a degree in chemistry.

[00:10:46] I don't stupid people, Tom.

[00:10:50] Oh, my gosh. I was. I did not think into the future anyway. So for ten years, I had a job as a chemist. Ten years? Yeah. Whoo! Well, I started in the laboratory and I was doing all companies work laboratory.

[00:11:08] And that's a good sign. Yeah.

[00:11:10] So I was. See, the problem with having a bachelor's degree in chemistry is that it's you're always gonna be a lab rat like you're gonna be someone else's larssen to do their work. So no. But however, my last job as a chemist, I was a tech rep. So that's what moved me down to San Diego. So I had a territory. It was pretty cool. I had a territory. And I would travel around to my accounts and I would test equipment and I would train people on stuff. And the only part of my job I liked, which was 10 percent of my job, was training them on something. So that's how I got the feel and the knack for the train. I say, yeah.

[00:12:02] All right. So how did you transition to being becoming a speaker?

[00:12:08] Oh, gosh. Okay, so. All right. Well, when I was a chemist, I said to my boss, this was kind of late. Thing I said to my boss, hey, hey, boss, I want to be I want to be part of the president's club. And the presidents club at that time was when they would take the top performer from each department and send them somewhere like the Bahamas for a week with their loved one. And for me at that time would have been my month. So I said to my boss, I want to go to the Bahamas with my mom. What do I need to do? And he goes, Oh, that's simple. You just need to do three things. This, this and this. So the next year, I did those three things. Just like he asked. OK. Well, right before review time, six months before review time, we had two mergers in a six month timeframe. So guess what? Yay! The only people only people that went to the Bahamas were the people from the company that bought us. Yeah. So what did I get? Zero. No, thank you. No. You like nothing? Absolutely nothing.

[00:13:16] Got a lot of good experience.

[00:13:18] Yeah. So check this out, though. The next year, the woman who got the award was a woman that I followed around all year long. Fixing her mistakes. She got the award. I quit one month later.

[00:13:33] And then then what?

[00:13:35] Ok. So then for eight months, I'm like, oh, I don't have a job. So a friend of mine had applied to skill part seminars. Have you heard of Skype? Has someone Ireally by Scopus? OK. So she had thought she had applied and been turned down, but I was like, oh, ha. Well, that sounds interesting. So I applied to go past seminars and then I got the job and I. And I joined on with them. I stayed with them for ten years, traveling around like everything had ten years.

[00:14:07] Everyone, apparently, I like having kids. Chemical. My analytical mind that just in life is really been tenure. Yes. Thanks for reminding me.

[00:14:19] So, yeah, but that's a hard life there too. I mean, it is very difficult. Know a lot of a lot of not fancy travel, put it that way. Plenty of travel, but not friends.

[00:14:31] Yeah, it wasn't fancy. And the days were long. These sessions are six hours and then you'd go to another town. I mean, I was on eleven planes and six days is awful. But during that time, I was able to play professional beach volleyball.

[00:14:46] You know, why is it why do you make such a big deal that it's beach volleyball that's like so like a lower level and you don't want to brag too much or that a higher level or what?

[00:14:55] No, no. It's just different. Like if you play indoor volleyball, you see, I never played in high school or college. I didn't start playing until I was 25. And if you play indoor, your skills have to be perfect. So you have to pass perfectly. Everything is very precise because there are six people on the court. But if there's only two of you, you could kind of be a little bit. OK. Like her past Chyna toward you. Like it doesn't have to be as exact.

[00:15:29] Well, let's see. That seems opposite to me because you got six people. Somebody ought to be able to take up the slack.

[00:15:36] There's only yet. Now you've got a pass to the setter and the setter has to. You know, it's very it's it's that they're very different games.

[00:15:45] Well, yes. From the from the guys watching point of view, nobody sees the ball anyway. They just see this tight little shorts you wear.

[00:15:54] Pretty much. That's a true point. That's true. So, yeah. So you made a lot of money doing that.

[00:16:02] All right, Tom, you're so funny. No, I did not make a lot of money, but I sure had a lot of fun. Yeah.

[00:16:11] But yeah. So.

[00:16:14] So you were doing this concurrently with your skill path work?

[00:16:18] That's correct. Right. Right.

[00:16:20] But I don't think there's too many beaches in like Toledo and Cleveland. You know, places they go, right?

[00:16:28] That's right. So that's why my I had to really be picky with my schedule.

[00:16:33] So so you thought you could pick your schedule and then you did at the beach towns or what? I mean, did you ever.

[00:16:41] Yeah. You know, I thought, you know, what I would do is with skill path. You give them your availability three or four months in advance. And I would know the volleyball tournament schedule. Oh, OK. So I would just say knows on the weeks of tournaments and then I would work on the other week.

[00:17:01] I got it. And then how did you get your partner?

[00:17:06] That was the hard part.

[00:17:08] It was who that's the hardest part of the whole deal is getting and finding a good partner. So, you know, there's there's only a small group of people in San Diego that we're playing, so. The pool is small, so you kind of just go through and take each other great.

[00:17:28] Others say more throughout the tournament, right?

[00:17:31] Yes, we do a tournament, but you could be dunked after a tournament. They think you're on your way. Go. That's correct. Yes.

[00:17:41] And how tall are you? I'm only 5, 10, 0, 3, 5, 10.

[00:17:45] So what was the range of people that were.

[00:17:48] Oh, gosh. You know, nowadays there are big girls there, like six foot I would say 6 foot 2, 6, 6, 6, 6. Oh my God. Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. Even rolls off in 6 feet 6 5. Yeah. Yeah. Never heard of that. Oh yeah. Uh-Huh.

[00:18:07] But. Yeah. So tell us about the business of professional volleyball. How did you get paid. Who paid you with the sponsors. How did that work.

[00:18:17] Yeah. Nope. I didn't have all coast. OK, so Tom I was at the bottom of the bracket. I supported the people at the top. So people go to a teensy bit. Yeah. You get paid according to how well you do in the majors when I want the Association of Volleyball Professionals. Yeah. They would pay but the top girls, they would get sponsors. I'd say the top ten we are able to get sponsors, you know, because they're they're seen and they're.

[00:18:47] I mean how much could they be making nowadays?

[00:18:50] Well, it's a good question.

[00:18:51] I'd say probably one to two hundred thousand and I would get a couple hundred thousand and then some of them doing modelling and things like that.

[00:19:03] Yeah. I don't hang out with them anymore. Tom, it's been a while. Yeah. I do know like one of the top girl, KERRI Walsh, she's got like she's on that Canisius tape. You know that tape you put on yourself. I know that she's. I saw her face on a box at one of those. And then. Yes, some of them some of them do. Modeling works fine.

[00:19:24] So you or you decide to go into speaking. So. So how did you transition the skill path?

[00:19:32] And was that a big deal or was that is it was another just drastic movement. I just got I just got sick of I didn't like the way I was treated. I certainly didn't like the what the amount of money they were paying. And I was just done. It was ten years.

[00:19:47] You know, my 10 year, my time here. I'm right here.

[00:19:50] So I dressed and I did the same thing I did before. I just quit both. And both of them, interestingly enough, happened in January. So January 2010, I was just like I did, but I was married at the time. So I had a backup income. I know. I felt, you know, I wasn't as scared as the first time when it was just me.

[00:20:13] Well, so I just went 10 years or what?

[00:20:17] The matters to all the marriage. No time, I said no, I didn't make it to 10. Oh, well, I made it to eight.

[00:20:28] Really bad. I know. I was really upset about that. It was it cameras to make it for 10 years. So sorry.

[00:20:37] So anyway, so you just quit. And then what?

[00:20:40] Ok, so. Gosh. OK. So January 2010, I quit. But what I realized pretty soon after I quit. Oh, my gosh. I don't have any clients and I don't know how to market. So I attended a constant contact, you know. Constant contact. Right. Yeah. So they had a free workshop on how to use their software. So this was in the end of January 2010. So I went to this flat ass. The first thing the instructor says is, OK, meet three people, turned to three people and give him your business card. I hate doing that. So I turned around to the person behind me. I gave him my card and I said, oh, I do customer service training. She says, Oh, my gosh, we need a customer service trainer. Yeah. And she just happened to work for a health care company. That's how I got into health care. So too. As of last year, they were my largest client in. And that's how I learned all these tips and the mystery calls and mystery patients and all the strategies I learned from that company. So just this year, actually.

[00:21:58] Well, that's a good. That's a lot of people tell you to show up. You don't never know what's going to happen. I mean, that changed the whole thing.

[00:22:06] Your career right there. Absolutely. Absolutely. Yeah.

[00:22:11] Yeah. So. So now do you do any keynote speaker or is it mostly true?

[00:22:16] I do do keynote speech. I love doing keynote speaking. I find I have a little bit I have more long term impact when I do trainings because I could do the follow up and I can see progress. But I do. I love the keynotes. Yay! Get people laughing and. But I feel that's very short term. You know, they they forget about me, what, an hour later?

[00:22:42] Well, maybe not too much. Well, about ten years. Ten years? Yeah. Ten years. There you go. Yeah. Remember you, Internews for boob.

[00:22:53] But how you run your business. So you charge a deposit. You only get paid after you're done. How do you how do you handle the payments?

[00:23:05] Well, own a business.

[00:23:06] So the main thing, my main source of income, I would say is the training. So normally what I do is I get in to a company by doing a customer service training. Once I'm in, then I can work with the managers and I can help them create protocols. And then we can go I can go back and do team building. So it starts at one gig, can turn in to many, many others, but it starts for me like my bait. My gateway product is good. The training, the customer service training. That's how I get it.

[00:23:46] And do you require a deposit before you put a date aside?

[00:23:52] I like 50 percent down. But, you know, that's not always the case, sometimes they pay 100 percent upfront, which is, you know, it's fine with me. But I for some reason, I like 50 percent down. And then I like the rest when I'm done. For me, I like that. But, you know, if you want to pay the whole thing up. Right. I'll take it, Tom.

[00:24:12] Well, the thing with me is, is I. It takes a while to get to this point, but there's fifty fifty percent on booking and then 50 percent two weeks before I get there. And I'll tell you how that developed is that, you know, I was making more and in 90 minutes than the training director was making in four months.

[00:24:34] So they were thrilled about me being there. I could do I could do it better. I'm from this company. I know. So they would after the event.

[00:24:41] They would leave me standing around and say, well, we're you know, we're doing a debrief and we'll get you. And I'm like walking the halls, like I'm homeless, waiting for my check.

[00:24:49] And I said, this is ending right today. And so I do it two weeks in advance now and then anything outside is one step out of the country.

[00:24:59] Everything is paid in advance, airfare, hotel, everything, because some some countries just don't have the you know, they. They look at a contract like, well, that was just the beginning point of our negotiation.

[00:25:14] As soon as thought the way I get it so that that's I work it.

[00:25:19] So. So we got to take a brief sponsor break and we come back. We're going to ask Barbara, what's a typical day look like for a professional customer service, X volleyball professional, ten year.

[00:25:35] Person. And then we'll see house these days motivated folks.

[00:25:43] I want you to watch a webinar if you have any inkling that you want to do a higher education or improve yourself or change careers, or maybe you have kids or neighbors or nephews, nieces and that that are thinking about higher education while the you know, they've brainwashed everybody for the last hundred years, eh? Got to go to college. You got to go to college. Well, maybe you do, but maybe you don't. The world has changed considerably. And if you watch this webinar, you're going to think twice about either, you know, mortgage in your house to go to college or or not. It's at screw the computer com slash webinars or you can go to scroobius meetup.com and just click on webinar. You can either download it or watch it, but be prepared to be mad because these universities are raising the tuitions and they're faking and inflating grade point averages. This is all proven and documented to make it look like they're doing a better job.

[00:26:49] But the testing is showing that they're not. So check this out. Oh, another crazy study, too. They followed two thousand kids among a whole bunch of universities.

[00:27:02] They found that average.

[00:27:05] That average, the kids were spending eight hours total preparing and going to class eight hours the rest of the time was shopping, eating and partying. Well, I don't know if I'd want to mortgage my house to pay for that. So check it out at school, the commute ICOM and then go to webinar section. You can download the MP 3 or you can watch the one. And it's not just me. I'm a whole bunch of high level education people ragging on the university system. So not just me, a hawk in my school, but anyway, I do like the hawk, my school and. In that case you can get an education at a reasonable price in a high demand skill. Be making money before you graduate even sometimes. So check it out at IMTCVA.org.

[00:27:56] Okay. So let's get back to the main event, Barbara Khozam's here. And Barbara, what's a typical day look like for you?

[00:28:04] Tom, there's no such thing as a typical day where you wake up every day, right? I do wake up every day early, but as a well, I do wake up at 6, 25 when I'm home. I wake up at twenty five twenty five a.m..

[00:28:21] You know, a chemist with six.

[00:28:23] Twenty five. No more than 200 podcasts boys. Six twenty five.

[00:28:30] Well there's you know first for everything you know. So when I'm home that's what I do. I wake up at six twenty five and then I do some things.

[00:28:41] But then you know what I like to like organize my day for like the first half hour.

[00:28:49] I just want to make sure. Okay. Let's get rid of the crap email. I want to make sure I'm on board with what I'm going to do my tasks for the day. Like a lot of people do that the night before.

[00:29:02] Yeah, she's great. I for some reason it works for me. I do it just the first 30 minutes I get ready.

[00:29:09] Whether you're traveling or not.

[00:29:12] No. This is when I'm home. Because sometimes, like, for example, tomorrow I. I have to get up at 3:30 to get on a 6:00 a.m. flight. So that may happen. But I'm getting, you know. So it happens in a different order. Right. Right. Because I have to get up so darn early. But I love travelling because I get so much freaking worked on on the airplane. I love it. So that's when I could do a cut up on the reading stuff. I can, you know, get blogs written and I could get, you know, outlines and my PowerPoint like I get a lot of worked on.

[00:29:49] How do you keep all the guys from hitting on you in the next seat?

[00:29:54] You know what? Nobody hits on me, Tom.

[00:29:57] Well, they don't. There's a reason for that. You must give out or you look at a nasty or you wear headphones in.

[00:30:07] And I don't wear headphones. I would be open for someone hitting on me.

[00:30:12] But that doesn't happen. OK.

[00:30:17] You get a lot of work done. OK. Yeah.

[00:30:20] And then what?

[00:30:24] All that while I might be doing a presentation. So then I do the presentation.

[00:30:28] Go the same day, the day before.

[00:30:31] Well, for example, tomorrow my presentation is not until 6:30 at night in Florida. So I'm flying there tomorrow morning. I'm I arrive four hours ahead of time.

[00:30:44] Wow, that's risky.

[00:30:45] And the cancellations and stuff.

[00:30:51] Yeah. Nope, I have because I've look up a backup backup flights. So I always make sure that, OK, if that there's a cancellation here, then I can go here. And if this is delayed there, then I can go here.

[00:31:02] So I always do that the day I haven't had a promotion rather than me because I go day before. Still. No, that's not that's that's smart. Thank you. If you're at all the schedules like you can.

[00:31:15] The chemist and me that. Yeah. So. Yeah. Yeah. So I fly in and they do the presentation and then. Yeah. So it's a long day tomorrow and Thursday.

[00:31:25] Fly back that evening. It is the other day.

[00:31:28] Well I have another presentation on Thursday evening so I travelled during the day. Then do you know while I'm not traveling. Still, Florida, a different town.

[00:31:40] Will leave that part of the world, right?

[00:31:43] Exactly. So that's this week, right? And then next weekend somewhere else.

[00:31:49] What about when you're home?

[00:31:51] Someone at home then? I do a lot. Five year fixed rate five.

[00:31:56] So then I work on my to do list and then I'd start working on stuff. So what is it? Is it sending emails to past clients, checking up on them? Is it looking for new prospects or speaking gigs or.

[00:32:11] There's a lot of you know, there's a lot of stuff.

[00:32:15] Video one creating a home video studio kid who would have thought of that?

[00:32:23] So Tom's been helping me with that yay time. Yeah. So I'm working on that and all sorts of things. Content. And, you know, I have an assistant. Thank God. So she posts on to Facebook and LinkedIn and Instagram for me. So I make sure she's on track. She reaches out, replies to speaking gigs for me. So I follow up with that, give her information, you know? There's a lot of stuff happening, Tom.

[00:32:49] And then you play volleyball in.

[00:32:53] Oh, gosh, yes. Every Sunday morning for sure. Sometimes Saturday is.

[00:32:59] Usually Saturdays and Sundays and then when you go out, dropped on the beach and just jump in on the game or what?

[00:33:06] No, no, no. We it's arranged. It's prearranged. So I've got a bunch of girls and I just sent him a text, hey, I can play Saturday and Sunday and and they fit me in and then we play.

[00:33:14] Oh, yeah. Very, very. Is it competitive or is it just fun or what?

[00:33:20] It's both. Yeah. These girls are good. I play with a lot of twenty five year olds and they have no idea how old I am. So don't tell them it's OK. Hello. Yeah. So yeah. You can't tell people your age because they judge you, you know. So yeah, you're really, really young.

[00:33:38] If you beat him into the sand and then the swagger away.

[00:33:46] I'm seven years old.

[00:33:50] Well, one girl said to me while she was twenty three and she came up to me. I she didn't know how old I was, but she said, I hope I'm still playing when I'm your age. Aha. So and then we started playing.

[00:34:04] And then you beat the hell out. That's right. And then afterwards, she didn't say anything.

[00:34:12] Did you ever see those YouTube videos where they address a bodybuilder up in, like looking like he's 90 years old and then down to Venice Beach and jumps in and says, hey, can I get a set, you know? And they're all snickering. I mean, he's lifting more than everybody else. That sounds like they have some basketball players to dress up like they're like 60, 70 years old and they don't care.

[00:34:38] All right. So what keeps you motivated?

[00:34:41] Oh, well, I like it when, like, I kind of like I said before, when I when my customers see progress, like win, what I like about working with doctors offices is a lot of them have to do surveys because Medicare will give them more reimbursement if they have better survey results. So I like that. It's measurable, you know, so I love it that I go in there. I work with them. Their survey scores go up. An A stays up over time. Oh, I love that. Yeah, that's really rewarding. So that's why that's why I'm really loving the doctors.

[00:35:19] Awesome, awesome, awesome. So so if anybody wants to hire you for some training stuff, I'll. They going to hold you.

[00:35:26] Oh, easy. They can simply go to my Web site. barbarakhozam.com.

[00:35:31] We'll have it in the show. Yes, too.

[00:35:34] Good. So it's my last name is K H O Z a M. Abacha's arm dot com or Brooky Mumsie.

[00:35:42] Yeah. And we'll have the show notes for you and then. And you're available outside the country, too, right?

[00:35:50] Oh, yeah. Guy, do this all over the world. It's very fun.

[00:35:53] What's the what's your favorite place outside the U.S.?

[00:35:58] Oh, my gosh.

[00:36:01] My favorite place, I like all places. That's where I was I went to. I've done I've I've worked in India and Malaysia and Taiwan and Australia, New Zealand. Oh, my gosh. They're also great. Everybody has great you know, something's great about everybody, that's for sure. Yeah.

[00:36:19] All right. Well, thanks for stopping by today. And tell us about your life as a 10 year, 10 year segments and you have to go get married. How long were you married?

[00:36:32] Eight years.

[00:36:33] All right. So you had to go get married two years to somebody else and then combine a moot put in the other great idea. Go. All right.

[00:36:42] So thanks so much for for gracing us with your presence and putting up with my bad voice. And the next episode, folks, is 200. It's called gamification. And that's not just playing games. It is making people really engage with your content. So we'll do that on Monday.

[00:37:05] All right. You get there by.

 
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