Bryan Rigg, Author of 'Flamethrower--Iwo Jima Medal of Honor Recipient and U.S. Marine Woody Williams and His Controversial Award'
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Bryan Rigg, Author of 'Flamethrower--Iwo Jima Medal of Honor Recipient and U.S. Marine Woody Williams and His Controversial Award'
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Scott Lorenz
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Contact Phone: 734-667-2098

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Bryan Rigg, Author of Flamethrower--Iwo Jima Medal of Honor Recipient and U.S. Marine Woody Williams and His Controversial Award
Bryan Rigg, Author of Flamethrower--Iwo Jima Medal of Honor Recipient and U.S. Marine Woody Williams and His Controversial Award

The last World War II recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor (MOH), Hershel "Woody" Williams, will receive another of the greatest honors granted an individual by the United States Government.  Williams, who passed away at the age of 98 on June 29, 2022, will lie in honor at the U.S. Capitol. The date has not yet been announced.

"Out of 669,100 marines who fought in WWII, only 82 were awarded the MOH," says Bryan Rigg, author of Flamethrower: Iwo Jima Medal of Honor Recipient and U.S. Marine Woody Williams and His Controversial Award.

Woody Williams received the Medal of Honor, the highest medal for valor in the United States military, for his actions on Iwo Jima island on February 23, 1945, when he used a flamethrower against the Imperial Japanese army positioned in fortified underground "pillboxes"

Taking Iwo Jima was considered strategically sound because, at 600-miles away from Japan, it could serve as a base to launch air assaults and mount the final act of invasion. Twenty thousand Japanese were entrenched in underground tunnels and bunkers on Iwo Jima, ready to fight to the end. The battles on Iwo Jima were some of the bloodiest in Marine Corps history but the leathernecks prevailed.


To arrange an interview with Dr. Bryan Rigg please contact Scott Lorenz of Westwind Communications Book Marketing at scottlorenz@westwindcos.com or by phone at 248-705-2214. Reach Lorenz on twitter @abookpublicist